Cary, NC, United States
Cary, NC, United States

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The use of an oncolytic virus and an aurora kinase inhibitor in the treatment of cancer is disclosed.


This invention is directed to a chorionic gonadotrophin carboxy terminal peptide (CTP)-modified dual GLP-1/Glucagon receptor agonist, and methods of producing and using the same.


Patent
Biologics | Date: 2017-02-15

A polypeptide consisting of a coagulation factor and one to five human chorionic gonadotropin carboxy terminal peptides (CTPs) attached to the carboxy terminus of said coagulation factor, wherein said coagulation factor is Factor VII or Factor VIIa, and wherein the sequence of said CTPs comprises the first 10 amino acids of SEQ ID NO: 4 (i.e., the amino acid sequence SSSSKAPPPS), and optionally, a signal peptide attached to the amino terminus of said coagulation factor. Pharmaceutical compositions comprising the polypeptides and medical uses thereof are also disclosed.


Patent
Biologics | Date: 2016-11-22

An apparatus and method may be used to separate a biological liquid sample and retrieve a separated liquid portion therefrom. The apparatus may have a tube, an insert, and a positioning mechanism. The tube may have a proximal end, a distal end, and a chamber between the proximal and distal ends for receiving the biological liquid sample. The insert may be positioned in the chamber, and may have a first end, a second end, a well between the first and second ends, and a draw tube in fluid communication with the second end and the well. The positioning mechanism may be connected to the tube and the insert, and may be manually actuable to move the insert between the proximal end and distal end to allow a separated portion of the biological liquid sample to flow proximally from the chamber through the draw tube and collect in the well.


The use of an oncolytic virus and an aurora kinase inhibitor in the treatment of cancer is disclosed.


Patent
Dartmouth College and Biologics | Date: 2017-03-22

Compositions comprising deimmunized lysostaphin and methods of using the same, e.g., to treat microbial infection in or on a subject, are provided.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 312.94K | Year: 2016

Gene therapy is becoming an increasingly important method of treatment for a variety of major unmet medical needs especially in the areas of inherited and rare diseases and diseases of the eye, conditions which are life threatening or significantly diminish quality of life. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are currently the delivery vehicle of choice for gene therapy treatments but the advancement these treatments into clinical trials is currently hampered by the time and expense required to manufacture these vectors. The proposed collaboration between Cobra and Touchlight will develop a fast and less expensive route to manufacture of AAV vectors, which will enable the acceleration of more potential products into clinical testing. This in turn will increase the chances of treatment being developed for a whole range of these currently intractable diseases.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 1.40M | Year: 2016

Gene therapy is becoming an increasingly important method of treatment for a variety of major unmet medical needs especially in the areas of inherited and rare diseases and diseases of the eye, conditions which are life threatening or significantly diminish quality of life. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are currently the delivery vehicle of choice for gene therapy treatments but the advancement of these treatments into clinical trials is currently hampered by the lack of scalabilty needed to manufacture these vectors. The proposed collaboration between Cobra and CPI will develop the scientific understanding to allow scalable flexibile process to be developed to manufacture AAV vectors. This will enable the acceleration of more potential products into clinical testing and ultimately new medicinces. This in turn will increase the chances of treatment being developed for a whole range of these currently intractable diseases.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 465.31K | Year: 2016

Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the main production host for >US$145billion/yr of protein biologics used as medicines for a range of diseases. The CHO platform is mature when considering production of monoclonal antibodies, but new format non-native molecules such as fusion proteins, antibody fragments and other exotic molecules remain difficult to express (DTE) in this, or any other host. This project builds upon proof of concept work demonstrating that engineering the CHO chassis, together with growth media manipulation, increases both the yield and quality of a number of DTE proteins that are in development for application to unmet clinical needs and diseases with no current treatments. The project will advance the technology readiness level of our preliminary findings beyond proof-of-concept to deliver the commercialization of new CHO cell systems for DTE proteins and associated bioprocesses ready for industrial application to produce these important new medicines.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 180.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project will be the development of an alternative to synthetic chemicals that are used to impart color to food. The food industry has a long history of using synthetic pigments that impart color to foods. However, there have been concerns about negative health impacts of some high volume synthetic colorants, and the food industry is increasingly interested in identifying colorants that are obtained from biological sources. This project will explore the technical and commercial feasibility of a class of naturally occurring pigments that have properties of color, stability, and safety that make them attractive as food colorants but for which a suitable source is not currently available. Based on six years of prior research, a potentially suitable botanical source of a red pigment has been identified, and now propose to develop a commercial process to produce the pigment from the botanical source.

This SBIR Phase I project proposes to develop a proof-of-concept pilot-scale process for extracting and purifying a naturally occurring pigment from a source plant. The pigment, which has not previously been available in commercial quantities, will be produced from a selected variety of a major crop species. Using mechanical separations, food grade solvent extractions, and various commercially-available food-grade adsorbants the goal is to produce pigment under conditions that can be used for proof-of-concept testing in model food products. The pigment produced will be characterized by analytical chemistry methods as a prelude to seeking FDA approval to sell the pigment for food use. The extracted pigment will be tested for performance characteristics, and for thermal, pH, and light stability in a range of probable food applications.

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