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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Kent researchers have identified how few mutations it can take for Ebolaviruses to adapt to affect previously resistant species Kent researchers have identified how few mutations it can take for Ebolaviruses to adapt to affect previously resistant species. Ebola is one of the world's most virulent diseases, though rodent species such as guinea pigs, rats and mice are not normally susceptible to it. However, through repeated infection of a host animal, Ebola virus strains can be generated that replicate and cause disease within new host rodent species. Scientists in the University of Kent's School of Biosciences examined the changes associated with Ebolavirus adaptation to rodents including guinea pigs and mice across four different studies. They found that only very few mutations, probably fewer than five, are required for the virus to adapt. In particular, a change in the Ebolavirus protein VP24 seems to be critical for Ebola viruses to infect a new animal species. Ebolaviruses infecting domestic species, including pigs and dogs, may also result in virus changes that may increase the risk to humans. Reston viruses, Ebolaviruses that have not been shown to cause disease in humans, so far, are known to circulate in domestic pigs in Asia. The research was performed by Dr Mark Wass (Senior Lecturer in Computational Biology), Professor Martin Michaelis (Professor of Molecular Medicine), and Dr Jeremy Rossman (Senior Lecturer in Virology) and members of their research groups. The research, entitled Changes associated with Ebola virus adaptation to novel species, was published in the journal Bioinformatics. See here: https:/ For further information or interview requests contact Sandy Fleming at the University of Kent Press Office. News releases can also be found at http://www. The recent Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa, which resulted in more than 28,000 confirmed cases and more than 11,000 deaths, raised concerns that similar (or even larger epidemics) may occur in the future. Ebolaviruses are zoonotic viruses, transmitted between different animal species and humans are typically infected by animals. The species in which Ebolaviruses are continuously circulating remain to be identified, although some bats have been suspected to be carriers. Zoonotic viruses that infect a novel species may adapt to this species and change their behaviour, meaning they can become more or less aggressive and/ or more or less transmissible. There is concern that Ebolaviruses may adapt to humans during human outbreaks, which may result in the emergence of novel virus types that can more easily spread between humans. Established in 1965, the University of Kent - the UK's European university - now has almost 20,000 students across campuses or study centres at Canterbury, Medway, Tonbridge, Brussels, Paris, Athens and Rome. It has been ranked: third for overall student satisfaction in the 2014 National Student Survey; 16th in the Guardian University Guide 2016; 23rd in the Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2016; and 22nd in the Complete University Guide 2015. In the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Rankings 2015-16, Kent is in the top 10% of the world's leading universities for international outlook. Kent is ranked 17th in the UK for research intensity (REF 2014). It has world-leading research in all subjects and 97% of its research is deemed by the REF to be of international quality. Along with the universities of East Anglia and Essex, Kent is a member of the Eastern Arc Research Consortium (http://www. ). The University is worth £0.7 billion to the economy of the south east and supports more than 7,800 jobs in the region. Student off-campus spend contributes £293.3m and 2,532 full-time-equivalent jobs to those totals. In 2014, Kent received its second Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

According to a new market research report "Metabolomics Market by Product (GC, HPLC, UPLC, NMR, Mass Spectrometry, Surface based mass analysis, Bioinformatics), Application (Biomarker & Drug Discovery, Nutrigenomics, Toxicology), Indication (Oncology, Cardiology, Inborn Errors) - Forecast to 2021", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market was valued at USD 1.03 Billion in 2016. This market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 14.6% during the forecast period (2016-2021) to reach USD 2.39 Billion by 2021. Browse 188 market data Tables and 42 Figures spread through 286 Pages and in-depth TOC on "Metabolomics Market" Early buyers will receive 10% customization on this report. The metabolomics market has witnessed significant growth primarily due to the increasing need for accurate diagnosis of diseases, rising demand for personalized medicine, and emergence of advanced technologies. However, need for well-qualified researchers, issues related to data examination and processing, and the high cost of tools and instruments are restraining the growth of this market. In this report, the market is majorly segmented by product and service, application, indication, and region. Based on product and service, the market is segmented into metabolomics instruments and metabolomics bioinformatics tools & services. The metabolomics instruments segment accounted for largest share of global metabolomics market in 2015. The metabolomics bioinformatics tools & services segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period. This is attributed to the smooth technological workflow in metabolomics and rapid, precise, reliable, and transparent data processing benefits gained from it. On the basis of application, the market is segmented into biomarker discovery, drug discovery, nutrigenomics, toxicology testing, personalized medicine, functional genomics, and others. In 2015, the biomarker discovery segment accounted for the largest share of the global metabolomics market. This is mainly attributed to the improvement in both the efficiency and reliability of metabolic profiling of biomarkers and the accurate and clinically useful diagnostic capabilities of metabolic biomarkers for the management of diseases at the metabolic level. However, the personalized medicine segment is expected to register the highest CAGR during the forecast period due to collaborations between pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology firms for biomarker discovery and validation. In 2015, North America accounted for the largest share of the metabolomics market, followed by Europe. Easy accessibility to technologically advanced products and the presence of a large number of leading metabolomics manufacturers in the region are driving market growth in North America. Similarly, the rising acceptance of personalized medicines, increasing metabolomics research activities, and growing adoption of technologically advanced products are driving the growth of the North American metabolomics market. The Asia-Pacific region is expected to witness the highest growth in this market majorly due to improving biopharmaceutical research infrastructure, large population, rising healthcare needs, growing per capita income, and growing economies in Japan and India. In addition, manufacturers are increasingly focusing on strengthening their presence in emerging markets of APAC countries. The global metabolomics market is highly competitive in nature, with the top five companies accounting for the major market share in 2015. Some key players in this market are Agilent Technologies, Inc. (U.S.), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. (U.S.), Bruker Corporation (U.S.), Danaher Corporation (U.S.), Shimadzu Corporation (Japan), Metabolon Inc. (U.S.), LECO Corporation (U.S.), Biocrates Life Sciences AG (Austria), Human Metabolome Technologies, Inc. (Japan), and Waters Corporation (U.S.). These leading players have primarily focused on product launches, acquisitions, agreements, collaborations, partnerships, and expansions for growth in the market. MarketsandMarkets is the largest market research firm worldwide in terms of annually published premium market research reports. Serving 1700 global fortune enterprises with more than 1200 premium studies in a year, M&M is catering to a multitude of clients across 8 different industrial verticals. We specialize in consulting assignments and business research across high growth markets, cutting edge technologies and newer applications. Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model - GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. M&M's flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets. The new included chapters on Methodology and Benchmarking presented with high quality analytical infographics in our reports gives complete visibility of how the numbers have been arrived and defend the accuracy of the numbers. We at MarketsandMarkets are inspired to help our clients grow by providing apt business insight with our huge market intelligence repository. Connect with us on LinkedIn @ http://www.linkedin.com/company/marketsandmarkets


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PHILADELPHIA - Casting one of the largest genomic nets to date for the rare tumors of the autonomic nervous system known as pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PCC/PGL) captured several new mutations driving the disease that could serve as potential drug targets, researchers from Penn Medicine and other institutions reported this week in Cancer Cell. Analyzing genetic data of 173 patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas, researchers, including senior author Katherine Nathanson, MD, a professor in the division of Translational Medicine and Human Genetics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and associate director for Population Science at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center, identified CSDE1 and fusion genes in MAML3 as drivers of the disease, both a first for any cancer type. The researchers also classified PCC/PGL into four distinct subtypes, each driven by mutations in distinct biological pathways, two of which are novel. "What's interesting about these tumors is that while they are astonishingly diverse genetically, with both inherited and somatic drivers influencing tumorigenesis, each has a single driver mutation, not multiple mutations," Nathanson said. "This characteristic makes these tumors ideal candidates for targeted therapy." Other cancer types typically contain anywhere from two to eight of these driver mutations. The discovery of these single drivers in PCC/PGL provides more opportunities for molecular diagnosis and prognosis in these patients, particularly those with more aggressive cancers, the authors said. PGLs are rare tumors of nerve ganglia in the body, whereas PCCs form in the center of the adrenal gland, which is responsible for producing adrenaline. The tumor causes the glands to overproduce adrenaline, leading to elevated blood pressure, severe headaches, and heart palpitations. Both are found in about two out of every million people each year. An even smaller percentage of those tumors become malignant - and become very aggressive. For that group, the five-year survival rate is about 50 percent. Matthew D. Wilkerson, MD, the Bioinformatics Director at the Collaborative Health Initiative Research Program at the Uniformed Services University, is the paper's co-senior author. To identify and characterize the genetic missteps, researchers analyzed tumor specimens using whole-exome sequencing, mRNA and microRNA sequencing, DNA-methylation arrays, and reverse-phase protein arrays. The four molecularly defined subgroups included: a kinase-signaling subtype, a pseudohypoxia subtype, a cortical admixture subtype, and a Wnt-altered subtype. The last two have been newly classified. The results also provided clinically actionable information by confirming and identifying several molecular markers associated with an increased risk of aggressive and metastatic disease, including germline mutations in SDBH, somatic mutations in ATRX (previously established in a Penn Medicine study), and new gene fusions - a genetic hybrid, of sorts - in MAML3. Because the MAML3 fusion gene activates the Wnt-altered subtype, the authors said, existing targeted therapies that inhibit the beta-catenin and STAT3 pathways may also prove effective in certain PCC/PGL tumors. Other mutations identified in the analysis may also serve as potential targets for drugs currently being investigated in other cancers. For example, glutaminase inhibitors are being tested in SDH-mutant tumors, including breast and lung, and ATR inhibitors are being investigated in blood cancers. Today, there are several U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved targeted therapies for mutations, such as BRAF and FGFR1, among others, also found in PCC/PGL. "The study gives us the most comprehensive understanding of this disease to date - which we believe will help researchers design better trials and target mutations that will ultimately help improve treatment for these patients," Nathanson said. "The next step is to focus more on aggressive cancers that metastasize and the drivers behind those tumors." Lauren Fishbein, MD, PhD, MTR, a former instructor in the division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at Penn who is now at the University of Colorado Hospital, served as the study's first author. The study was supported with grants by the National Institutes of Health (U54 HG003273, U54 HG003067, U54 HG003079, U24 CA143799, U24 CA143835, U24 CA143840, U24 CA143843, U24 CA143845, U24 CA143848, U24 CA143858, U24 CA143866, U24 CA143867, U24 CA143882, U24 CA143883, U24 CA144025, P30 CA016672). Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $5.3 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 18 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $373 million awarded in the 2015 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Chestnut Hill Hospital and Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2015, Penn Medicine provided $253.3 million to benefit our community.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RIVERSIDE, Calif. - The mosquito Aedes aegypti, which can spread dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, and yellow fever virus, requires a blood meal to develop eggs. One way to control the spread of these diseases is to tamper with the reproductive events that follow this mosquito's blood meal. This is what a team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside has explored at the molecular level. The researchers focused on small regulatory RNA molecules, called microRNAs, which play a critical role in mosquito egg maturation. They studied microRNA expression in the Aedes aegypti fat body--the metabolic center that plays a key role in reproduction. Since proper functioning of the fat body is essential for the development of the female reproductive system after a blood meal, identifying which miRNAs are important to fat body functions, and what specific genes they target, can help design ways to manipulate the levels of microRNA or their targets, affect their interactions, disrupt mosquito reproduction, and thus prevent the spread of diseases the mosquitoes transmit. The researchers report online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that they observed five major microRNA expression peaks within a 48-hour period following the female mosquito's blood meal. "What we observed is that the levels of many miRNAs change significantly throughout the 48-hour period following a blood meal, indicating that these miRNAs, in turn, may be establishing significant changes in expression of key genes during this time in the fat body," said Fedor V. Karginov, an assistant professor of cell biology and neuroscience, who co-led the research team along with Alexander S. Raikhel, a distinguished professor of entomology at UC Riverside. "Our work has given us a much needed picture of which miRNAs are abundant in the fat body tissue, how each miRNA subgroup changes over time, and we have confirmation that specific up- and down-regulation of miRNA levels takes place during egg development." Specifically, the researchers measured the levels of all microRNAs in the fat body (around 100 different miRNAs) at five points of time, starting just before mosquitos take a blood meal, and then 6, 24, 36, and 48 hours after the blood meal. The timing of these was chosen based on previously known information on the timing of major physiological changes - or milestones - in the fat body after a blood meal. Karginov explained that each microRNA, together with a partner protein called Argonaute or "Ago," binds to (or "targets") several to many "messenger RNAs" (mRNAs), and thus down-regulates the expression of the corresponding genes. Determining the targets of important miRNAs is crucial to uncover the regulatory gene networks that drive the physiological changes in the fat body after blood meal. Karginov, Raikhel and their team members experimentally identified the binding sites for Ago/miRNAs on mRNAs in the fat body. They performed this identification at two points of time to study any changes that may have occurred, using "CLIP-seq," an experimentally challenging procedure that, to Karginov and his team's knowledge, has not been used on mosquito tissues before, and that provides a large trove of potential microRNA-mRNA interactions for further investigation. "The CLIP-seq data have given us insight into which genes the microRNA target, providing a solid foundation for future studies of miRNA regulation during the egg production cycle," Raikhel said. "Now that we know these genes, we are a step closer to controlling the spread of Aedes aegypti by disrupting a key process in the reproductive cycle: egg production." Karginov and Raikhel were joined in the research by Xiufeng Zhang (first author of the paper), a postdoctoral researcher in Raikhel's lab; Emre Aksoy, a second-year student in the Graduate Program in Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics; and Thomas Girke, a professor of bioinformatics. The study was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health. The University of California, Riverside is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment is now nearly 23,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

They have found the molecules in the well-known glacier mummy "Ötzi". A number of facts have been scientifically proven about the glacier mummy, known as "the Iceman" or "Ötzi," found in the Ötztal Alps (South Tyrol) in 1991. Through imaging techniques, we know about degeneration in his lumbar spine and a fatal arrow wound in his left shoulder. DNA analyses showed that Ötzi was lactose intolerant, and had brown eyes and blood type 0. Now a study of Ötzi's microRNAs has also been completed. MicroRNAs are very small pieces of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and play a central role in the regulation of genes. Although these molecules are very stable in tissues, prior to this study it was unclear whether they could still be found in human tissues after thousands of years. Therefore, Professors Andreas Keller and Eckart Meese of Saarland University, Stephanie Kreis of the University of Luxembourg, and Professor Albert Zink and Frank Maixner of Eurac Research in Bozen took on the challenge. They analyzed not only tissue samples from the Iceman, but also those from a mummy of a soldier fallen in World War I. "Our investigation provides evidence that we can analyze microRNA even after thousands of years," explains Andreas Keller, Professor of Clinical Bioinformatics at Saarland University, who coordinated the study. The scientists took samples from Ötzi's skin, stomach, and stomach contents. "It was a challenge to extract this genetic material in significant quantities and sufficient quality from the mummified tissue samples, and to measure and quantify it with the newest, very precise methods," reports Stephanie Kreis, who isolated the microRNAs at the University of Luxembourg. Some molecules were found that were present predominantly in the ancient tissues. Conversely, some of the biomarkers that are well-known today were not found in Ötzi. According to Professor Zink from Eurac Research, the microRNAs are the next important class of molecules from Ötzi to receive intensive examination. Professor Meese, head of the Institute of Human Genetics at Saarland University, claims that the stability of these biomarkers is also important for people today. "It is vital for clinical applications," explains Meese. "It's evident that the potential of microRNA is much greater than we previously thought. We still don't know enough about how these molecules influence specific genes, entire gene families, or biochemical reaction pathways. When we investigate this further, it's possible microRNAs will become new stars in therapy. Until then, however, there is a lot more work to do," concludes Professor Keller. Publication "miRNAs in ancient tissue specimens of the Tyrolean Iceman" https:/ Questions can be directed to: Professor Albert Zink Institute for Mummies and the Iceman Eurac Research Tel.: +39 0471 055561 E-mail: albert.zink@eurac.edu


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: phys.org

For one thing, volume. Now, research published this week in Nature Communications makes it possible to predict how volume for a given protein will change between the folded and unfolded state. Computations accurately predict how a protein will react to increased pressure, shed light on the inner-workings of life in the ocean depths, and may also offer insights into alien life. "We're finding planets with ocean that, although cold at the surface, are likely warm at the bottom. So what would life look like in that space?" said George Makhatadze, a Constellation Professor of Biocomputation and Bioinformatics and member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. "With this computational ability, we can look at the proteome of barophillic organisms on Earth and ask - how do their proteins adapt?" Scientists have long known that a protein will unfold under increased pressure if its unfolded state has a lower volume, and will remain folded if the unfolded state has a higher volume. But, while scientists experimentally measured a range of -4% to +1% change in volume as proteins immersed in water move from the folded to unfolded state, predictive computation to match those measurements has been harder to come by. The protein volume paradox dates back to the first X-ray structures of proteins, when images showed that 30 percent of the volume of a protein is comprised of voids and cavities inside the imperfectly packed atoms of the structure. Researchers assumed proteins would lose about 30 percent of their volume when unfolded, and wondered at the disparity between that figure and experimental measurements. Seeking to resolve the difference, researchers hypothesized that unfolded proteins were interacting with the water in which they were immersed, gaining volume, and proposed a "transfer method" to calculate that effect. Their method tested the volume change of several "model" molecules commonly found in proteins when moved from a non-aqueous solvent to water. However, the method yielded a small decrease in volume, compounding the disparity with measurements. Makhatadze's group found several mistaken assumptions in the two postulates of the paradox. Although the atoms of an unfolded protein are less densely packed than a folded one, the complex shape retains some voids and cavities, so a 30 percent decrease in volume is unrealistic. Also, the transfer method begins in error because the non-aqueous solvent creates a volume-boosting buffer that disappears when compounds are immersed in water. The research group wrote a computer program to accurately calculate the volume of the unfolded protein, an advance published separately in a 2015 edition of BMC Bioinformatics, and found a 7 percent decrease in volume based on lost voids and cavities. Switching to a transfer method that moves compounds from a gas phase to water produced a slight increase in volume. "So these two factors - the volume change when voids and cavities are eliminated through unfolding, and the volume change as the unfolded protein is exposed to water - are cancelling each other out in a very intricate way." Then Makhatadze's group went a step further, finding a common property in the volume change of 140 molecules: when a model compound is immersed in water, only certain areas of the molecule increase in volume, namely those areas that are non-polar, or do not interact with water. With that information, the group calculated the percentage change in volume for more than 200 proteins and match the observed range of -4% to +1%. "Not only do we reach the experimental range, we can also quantitatively predict the volume changes for a given protein." "Molecular determinant of the effects of hydrostatic pressure on protein folding stability" was published in the February edition of Nature Communications. More information: Calvin R. Chen et al, Molecular determinant of the effects of hydrostatic pressure on protein folding stability, Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14561


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Kent researchers have identified how few mutations it can take for Ebolaviruses to adapt to affect previously resistant species. Ebola is one of the world's most virulent diseases, though rodent species such as guinea pigs, rats and mice are not normally susceptible to it. However, through repeated infection of a host animal, Ebola virus strains can be generated that replicate and cause disease within new host rodent species. Scientists in the University of Kent's School of Biosciences examined the changes associated with Ebolavirus adaptation to rodents including guinea pigs and mice across four different studies. They found that only very few mutations, probably fewer than five, are required for the virus to adapt. In particular, a change in the Ebolavirus protein VP24 seems to be critical for Ebola viruses to infect a new animal species. Ebolaviruses infecting domestic species, including pigs and dogs, may also result in virus changes that may increase the risk to humans. Reston viruses, Ebolaviruses that have not been shown to cause disease in humans, so far, are known to circulate in domestic pigs in Asia. The research was performed by Dr Mark Wass (Senior Lecturer in Computational Biology), Professor Martin Michaelis (Professor of Molecular Medicine), and Dr Jeremy Rossman (Senior Lecturer in Virology) and members of their research groups. The research, entitled "Changes associated with Ebola virus adaptation to novel species," was published in the journal Bioinformatics.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - Feb 28, 2017) - CFN Media Group ("CannabisFN"), the leading creative agency and digital media network dedicated to legal cannabis, today announced the publication of an article examining InMed Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s ( : IMLFF) ( : IN) innovative bioinformatics platform, its recent licensing deal, and how the platform fits with the rest of the company's initiatives. InMed Pharmaceuticals' proprietary in-silico Bioinformatics Database Assessment Tool leverages extensive databases and proprietary algorithms to rapidly identify cannabinoid combinations that are likely to have an effect on specific diseases. By doing so, the platform helps drug development companies shorten the drug discovery period, reduce the costs, and increases the likelihood of success from the onset of drug development. The platform has three core components: 2. A database on the structure of currently approved pharmaceutical products. 3. An extensive database of over 90 individual cannabinoid drugs found in cannabis. InMed's data included in its bioinformatics assessment tool are derived from both public and proprietary sources and include protein-protein interactions, gene regulation, epigenetic modification, cell signal networks, and metabolomics. Using proprietary algorithms the platform establishes gene and protein-protein interaction networks to identify multi-target based approaches for specific diseases. In addition to leveraging the platform for its own drug pipeline, the company signed a term sheet for its first potential licensing deal with Revive Therapeutics Ltd., which is developing cannabinoid-based therapeutics for kidney diseases. Please follow the link to read the full article: http://www.cannabisfn.com/inmeds-bioinformatics-platform-powers-cannabinoid-drug-development/ Learn how to become a CFN Media client company, brand or entrepreneur: http://www.cannabisfn.com/become-featured-company/ Download the CFN Media iOS mobile app to access the world of cannabis from the palm of your hand: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cannabisfn/id988009247?ls=1&mt=8 Or visit our homepage and enter your mobile number under the Apple App Store logo to receive a download link text on your iPhone: http://www.cannabisfn.com CFN Media (CannabisFN), the leading creative agency and media network dedicated to legal cannabis, helps marijuana businesses attract investors, customers (B2B, B2C), capital, and media visibility. Private and public marijuana companies and brands in the US and Canada rely on CFN Media to grow and succeed. CFN launched in June of 2013 to initially serve the growing universe of publicly traded marijuana companies across North America. Today, CFN Media is also the digital media choice for the emerging brands in the space. Except for the historical information presented herein, matters discussed in this release contain forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Emerging Growth LLC, which owns CFN Media and CannabisFN.com, is not registered with any financial or securities regulatory authority, and does not provide nor claims to provide investment advice or recommendations to readers of this release. Emerging Growth LLC may from time to time have a position in the securities mentioned herein and may increase or decrease such positions without notice. For making specific investment decisions, readers should seek their own advice. Emerging Growth LLC may be compensated for its services in the form of cash-based compensation or equity securities in the companies it writes about, or a combination of the two. For full disclosure please visit: http://www.cannabisfn.com/legal-disclaimer/.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

They have found the molecules in the well-known glacier mummy "Ötzi." A number of facts have been scientifically proven about the glacier mummy, known as "the Iceman" or "Ötzi," found in the Ötztal Alps (South Tyrol) in 1991. Through imaging techniques, we know about degeneration in his lumbar spine and a fatal arrow wound in his left shoulder. DNA analyses showed that Ötzi was lactose intolerant, and had brown eyes and blood type 0. Now a study of Ötzi's microRNAs has also been completed. MicroRNAs are very small pieces of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and play a central role in the regulation of genes. Although these molecules are very stable in tissues, prior to this study it was unclear whether they could still be found in human tissues after thousands of years. Therefore, Professors Andreas Keller and Eckart Meese of Saarland University, Stephanie Kreis of the University of Luxembourg, and Professor Albert Zink and Frank Maixner of Eurac Research in Bozen took on the challenge. They analyzed not only tissue samples from the Iceman, but also those from a mummy of a soldier fallen in World War I. "Our investigation provides evidence that we can analyze microRNA even after thousands of years," explains Andreas Keller, Professor of Clinical Bioinformatics at Saarland University, who coordinated the study. The scientists took samples from Ötzi's skin, stomach, and stomach contents. "It was a challenge to extract this genetic material in significant quantities and sufficient quality from the mummified tissue samples, and to measure and quantify it with the newest, very precise methods," reports Stephanie Kreis, who isolated the microRNAs at the University of Luxembourg. Some molecules were found that were present predominantly in the ancient tissues. Conversely, some of the biomarkers that are well-known today were not found in Ötzi. According to Professor Zink from Eurac Research, the microRNAs are the next important class of molecules from Ötzi to receive intensive examination. Professor Meese, head of the Institute of Human Genetics at Saarland University, claims that the stability of these biomarkers is also important for people today. "It is vital for clinical applications," explains Meese. "It's evident that the potential of microRNA is much greater than we previously thought. We still don't know enough about how these molecules influence specific genes, entire gene families, or biochemical reaction pathways. When we investigate this further, it's possible microRNAs will become new stars in therapy. Until then, however, there is a lot more work to do," concludes Professor Keller.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

DUBLIN, Feb. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Bioinformatics - Global Strategic Business Report" report to their offering. The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin...

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