BiogenGreenfinch

Ludlow, United Kingdom

BiogenGreenfinch

Ludlow, United Kingdom
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Banks C.J.,University of Southampton | Chesshire M.,BiogenGreenfinch | Heaven S.,University of Southampton | Arnold R.,BiogenGreenfinch
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2011

An anaerobic digester receiving food waste collected mainly from domestic kitchens was monitored over a period of 426days. During this time information was gathered on the waste input material, the biogas production, and the digestate characteristics. A mass balance accounted for over 90% of the material entering the plant leaving as gaseous or digestate products. A comprehensive energy balance for the same period showed that for each tonne of input material the potential recoverable energy was 405kWh. Biogas production in the digester was stable at 642m3tonne-1 VS added with a methane content of around 62%. The nitrogen in the food waste input was on average 8.9kgtonne-1. This led to a high ammonia concentration in the digester which may have been responsible for the accumulation of volatile fatty acids that was also observed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Banks C.,University of Southampton | Chesshire M.,BiogenGreenfinch | Heaven S.,University of Southampton | Arnold R.,BiogenGreenfinch | Lewis L.,BiogenGreenfinch
Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management | Year: 2011

The Biocycle digester in South Shropshire, UK was monitored over a period of 14 months. During this time, the type, source and quantity of input biowastes were analysed and their physical and chemical properties were determined, including quantification of heavy metals content. The source-segregated waste was found to be a rich source of energy and was readily biodegradable, producing a biogas with ~60% methane. The process had a very favourable energy balance with around 400 kWh of energy recoverable from each tonne of waste processed. Although the available heat energy was not utilised, over 620MWh of the electricity produced was exported to the grid during the study period. An energy balance for the process included the transport and application of the digestate to farmland. 3936 t wet weight of wastes were processed during the study period and over 90% of this mass could be accounted for in the gaseous and digestion products. The environmental benefits and risks of the process are considered in terms of the carbon savings and losses that may result through adoption of this technology.

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