Parnell, New Zealand
Parnell, New Zealand

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Biswas K.,University of Auckland | Taylor M.W.,University of Auckland | Turner S.J.,University of Auckland | Turner S.J.,BioDiscovery New Zealand Ltd
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Biofilm-based technologies, such as moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems, are widely used to treat wastewater. Biofilm development is important for MBBR systems as much of the microbial biomass is retained within reactors as biofilm on suspended carriers. Little is known about this process of biofilm development and the microorganisms upon which MBBRs rely. We documented successional changes in microbial communities as biofilms established in two full-scale MBBR systems treating municipal wastewater over two seasons. 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing and clone libraries were used to describe microbial communities. These data indicate a successional process that commences with the establishment of an aerobic community dominated by Gammaproteobacteria (up to 52 % of sequences). Over time, this community shifts towards dominance by putatively anaerobic organisms including Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridiales. Significant differences were observed between the two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), mostly due to a large number of sequences (up to 55 %) representing Epsilonproteobacteria (mostly Arcobacter) at one site. Archaea in young biofilms included several lineages of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. In contrast, the mature biofilm consisted entirely of Methanosarcinaceae (Euryarchaeota). This study provides new insights into the community structure of developing biofilms at full-scale WWTPs and provides the basis for optimizing MBBR start-up and operational parameters. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Biswas K.,University of Auckland | Taylor M.W.,University of Auckland | Turner S.J.,University of Auckland | Turner S.J.,BioDiscovery New Zealand Ltd
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important members of the sulphur cycle in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigate the diversity and activity of SRB within the developing and established biofilm of two moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater in New Zealand. The larger of the two WWTPs (Moa Point) generates high levels of sulphide relative to the smaller Karori plant. Clone libraries of the dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase (dsrAB) genes and quantitative real-time PCR targeting dsrA transcripts were used to compare SRB communities between the two WWTPs. Desulfobulbus (35-53 % of total SRB sequences) and genera belonging to the family Desulfobacteraceae (27-41 %) dominated the SRB fraction of the developing biofilm on deployed plastic carriers at both sites, whereas Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium were exclusively found at Moa Point. In contrast, the established biofilms from resident MBBR carriers were largely dominated by Desulfomonile tiedjei-like organisms (58-100 % of SRB sequences). The relative transcript abundance of dsrA genes (signifying active SRBs) increased with biofilm weight yet remained low overall, even in the mature biofilm stage. Our results indicate that although SRB are both present and active in the microbial community at both MBBR study sites, differences in the availability of sulphate may be contributing to the observed differences in sulphide production at these two plants. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.


The disclosure relates to methods for the screening, identification, and/or application of one or more microorganisms of use in imparting one or more beneficial properties to one or more plants.


Patent
BIODISCOVERY NEW ZEALAND Ltd | Date: 2013-09-19

The present invention relates to methods for the screening, identification and/or application of microorganisms and/or compositions of use in imparting beneficial properties to plants, and microorganisms and compositions identified therefrom.


Patent
Biodiscovery New Zealand Ltd | Date: 2013-10-10

The invention relates to methods for the screening, identification and/or application of microorganisms of use in imparting beneficial properties to plants. In one embodiment, the method involves subjecting one or more plants to a growth medium in the presence of a set of microorganisms, selecting one or more plant, acquiring one or more microorganisms associated with the selected plant(s) and repeating the process one or more times. The method further involves the step of subjecting the one or more microorganisms to a conditioning and/or directed evolution process.


Patent
Biodiscovery New Zealand Ltd | Date: 2012-03-16

The present invention relates to methods for the screening, identification and/or application of microorganisms and/or compositions of use in imparting beneficial properties to plants, and microorganisms and compositions identified therefrom.


The disclosure relates to methods for the screening, identification, and/or application of one or more microorganisms of use in imparting one or more beneficial properties to one or more plants.


Patent
Biodiscovery New Zealand Ltd | Date: 2013-10-10

The present invention relates to methods for the screening, identification and/or application of microorganisms of use in imparting beneficial properties to plants.


The disclosure relates to methods for the screening, identification, and/or application of one or more microorganisms of use in imparting one or more beneficial properties to one or more plants.


The disclosure relates to methods for the screening, identification, and/or application of one or more microorganisms of use in imparting one or more beneficial properties to one or more plants.

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