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News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Biobest are pleased to offer a sheep scab ELISA blood test which was developed at the Moredun Research Institute. This test can be used for the diagnosis of sheep scab infestation and to monitor flock status to aid scab control programmes.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Biobest are pleased to announce a new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV).


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Global BioControl Agents market is estimated at $1.55 billion in 2015 and is poised to reach $3.67 billion by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 13.1% from 2015 to 2022. Rising concern regarding food contamination due to excess usage of pesticides is one of the key factors driving the market growth. Furthermore, concern about environment and soil fertility are the factors favoring the market growth. However, lack of adequate awareness among users acts as a restraint for BioControl Agents market. Based on application, On-Field segment is likely to acquire the highest market share during the forecast period driven by the use of beneficial insects. On-field and seed treatment segments are capturing maximum of the market share in BioControl Agents application market. Due to their low cost and large availability, Microbials are the most widely chosen active substances. North America leads the market globally with the largest market share and is expected to grow at the highest CAGR among the other regions. Some of the key players in the global market include Andermatt Biocontrol AG, BASF SE, Bayer CropScience AG, Biobest N.V., BioTech Systems LTD, Certis USA LLC, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont, FMC Corporation, Kenogard S.A., Koppert Biological Systems B.V., Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc., Monsanto Company Inc., Novozymes A/S and Syngenta AG. Environment Covered:  • Out Field Crops  • Horticulture  Applications Covered:  • On-Field  • Post-Harvest  • Seed Treatment  Target Pests Covered:  • Micro-Organisms  • Arthropods  • Weeds  Regions Covered:  • North America  o US  o Canada  o Mexico  • Europe  o Germany  o France  o Italy  o UK  o Spain  o Rest of Europe  • Asia Pacific  o Japan  o China  o India  o Australia  o New Zealand  o Rest of Asia Pacific  • Rest of the World  o Middle East  o Brazil  o Argentina  o South Africa  o Egypt What our report offers:  - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments  - Market share analysis of the top industry players  - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants  - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets  - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations)  - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations  - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends  - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments  - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports understand how essential statistical surveying information is for your organization or association. Therefore, we have associated with the top publishers and research firms all specialized in specific domains, ensuring you will receive the most reliable and up to date research data available.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Global BioControl Agents market is estimated at $1.55 billion in 2015 and is poised to reach $3.67 billion by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 13.1% from 2015 to 2022. Rising concern regarding food contamination due to excess usage of pesticides is one of the key factors driving the market growth. Furthermore, concern about environment and soil fertility are the factors favoring the market growth. However, lack of adequate awareness among users acts as a restraint for BioControl Agents market. Based on application, On-Field segment is likely to acquire the highest market share during the forecast period driven by the use of beneficial insects. On-field and seed treatment segments are capturing maximum of the market share in BioControl Agents application market. Due to their low cost and large availability, Microbials are the most widely chosen active substances. North America leads the market globally with the largest market share and is expected to grow at the highest CAGR among the other regions. Some of the key players in the global market include Andermatt Biocontrol AG, BASF SE, Bayer CropScience AG, Biobest N.V., BioTech Systems LTD, Certis USA LLC, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont, FMC Corporation, Kenogard S.A., Koppert Biological Systems B.V., Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc., Monsanto Company Inc., Novozymes A/S and Syngenta AG. Regions Covered:  • North America  o US  o Canada  o Mexico  • Europe  o Germany  o France  o Italy  o UK  o Spain  o Rest of Europe  • Asia Pacific  o Japan  o China  o India  o Australia  o New Zealand  o Rest of Asia Pacific  • Rest of the World  o Middle East  o Brazil  o Argentina  o South Africa  o Egypt What our report offers:  - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments  - Market share analysis of the top industry players  - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants  - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets  - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations)  - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations  - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends  - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments  - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements Executive Summary  2 Preface  2.1 Abstract  2.2 Stake Holders  2.3 Research Scope  2.4 Research Methodology  2.4.1 Data Mining  2.4.2 Data Analysis  2.4.3 Data Validation  2.4.4 Research Approach  2.5 Research Sources  2.5.1 Primary Research Sources  2.5.2 Secondary Research Sources  2.5.3 Assumptions  3 Market Trend Analysis  3.1 Introduction  3.2 Drivers  3.3 Restraints  3.4 Opportunities  3.5 Threats  3.6 Application Analysis  3.7 Emerging Markets  4 Porters Five Force Analysis  4.1 Bargaining power of suppliers  4.2 Bargaining power of buyers  4.3 Threat of substitutes  4.4 Threat of new entrants  4.5 Competitive rivalry  5 Global BioControl Agents Market, By Crop Type  5.1 Introduction  5.2 Vegetables & Fruits  5.3 Cereals & Grains  5.4 Pulses & Oils  5.5 Other Crops  6 Global BioControl Agents Market, By Active Substance  6.1 Introduction  6.2 Microbials  6.2.1 Fungi  6.2.2 Bacteria  6.2.3 Viruses  6.2.4 Other  6.3 Macrobials  6.3.1 Weed Killers  6.3.2 Parasitoids  6.3.3 Predators  6.4 Entomopathogenic Nematodes  7 Global BioControl Agents Market, By Environment  7.1 Introduction  7.2 Out Field Crops  7.3 Horticulture  Continued.... About Us Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports understand how essential statistical surveying information is for your organization or association. Therefore, we have associated with the top publishers and research firms all specialized in specific domains, ensuring you will receive the most reliable and up to date research data available.


Meeus I.,Ghent University | de Miranda J.R.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | de Graaf D.C.,Ghent University | Wackers F.,Biobest | Smagghe G.,Ghent University
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Year: 2014

Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) together with Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and Kashmir bee virus (KBV) constitute a complex of closely related dicistroviruses. They are infamous for their high mortality after injection in honeybees. These viruses have also been reported in non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators such as bumblebees, which got infected with IAPV when placed in the same greenhouse with IAPV infected honeybee hives. Here we orally infected Bombus terrestris workers with different doses of either IAPV or KBV viral particles. The success of the infection was established by analysis of the bumblebees after the impact studies: 50days after infection. Doses of 0.5×107 and 1×107 virus particles per bee were infectious over this period, for IAPV and KBV respectively, while a dose of 0.5×106 IAPV particles per bee was not infectious. The impact of virus infection was studied in micro-colonies consisting of 5 bumblebees, one of which becomes a pseudo-queen which proceeds to lay unfertilized (drone) eggs. The impact parameters studied were: the establishment of a laying pseudo-queen, the timing of egg-laying, the number of drones produced, the weight of these drones and worker mortality. In this setup KBV infection resulted in a significant slower colony startup and offspring production, while only the latter can be reported for IAPV. Neither virus increased worker mortality, at the oral doses used. We recommend further studies on how these viruses transmit between different pollinator species. It is also vital to understand how viral prevalence can affect wild bee populations because disturbance of the natural host-virus association may deteriorate the already critically endangered status of many bumblebee species. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Meeus I.,Ghent University | Mosallanejad H.,Ghent University | Niu J.,Ghent University | de Graaf D.C.,Ghent University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology | Year: 2014

Honeybees and bumblebees are the most important pollinators of agricultural crops. For this purpose honeybees and bumblebees are reared and transported. A pathogen-free status of bees in general, is crucial. Indeed anthropogenic transports of hosts carrying parasites could alter the natural host/pathogen association, inducing an extra pathogenic stress. Therefore the creation of a pathogen-free rearing environment is needed. For bumblebees this is possible, as these species are reared in a closed environment. Although, a link remains between reared bumblebees and the outside bee community, as honeybee-collected pollen is essential food for bumblebee mass rearing. Here we evaluated if gamma irradiation can minimize the risk of this potential route of exposure and can inactivate viral particles present in honeybee-collected pollen. We show that 16.9. kGy gamma irradiation induced a 100-1000 fold reduction on the ability of IAPV to cause mortality after injections. This result opens avenues toward rearing pathogen-free bumblebees and towards eliminating the risks of pathogen spillover to native wild bee species. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Biobest and Ghent University
Type: | Journal: Journal of invertebrate pathology | Year: 2014

Honeybees and bumblebees are the most important pollinators of agricultural crops. For this purpose honeybees and bumblebees are reared and transported. A pathogen-free status of bees in general, is crucial. Indeed anthropogenic transports of hosts carrying parasites could alter the natural host/pathogen association, inducing an extra pathogenic stress. Therefore the creation of a pathogen-free rearing environment is needed. For bumblebees this is possible, as these species are reared in a closed environment. Although, a link remains between reared bumblebees and the outside bee community, as honeybee-collected pollen is essential food for bumblebee mass rearing. Here we evaluated if gamma irradiation can minimize the risk of this potential route of exposure and can inactivate viral particles present in honeybee-collected pollen. We show that 16.9kGy gamma irradiation induced a 100-1000 fold reduction on the ability of IAPV to cause mortality after injections. This result opens avenues toward rearing pathogen-free bumblebees and towards eliminating the risks of pathogen spillover to native wild bee species.


PubMed | Biobest, Shepherd University and U.S. Department of Agriculture
Type: | Journal: Environmental entomology | Year: 2016

Incorporating nonprey sugar resources into apple orchards is a potential means of enhancing biological control services, but little is known about the impacts of extrafloral nectars on aphidophagous coccinellids. We explored peach Prunus persica (L.) Batsch extrafloral nectar as a supplemental resource for Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), a key aphid predator in the mid-Atlantic United States. Extrafloral nectar quantity, temporal production, and carbohydrate profile were assessed for four peach cultivars in orchard and greenhouse culture. Seasonal densities of H. axyridis visiting extrafloral nectaries were estimated, and the propensity of beetles to feed upon extrafloral nectar was compared by cultivar in the laboratory. We also compared survival of newly eclosed adult pairs that were starved or fed aphids with or without extrafloral nectar. Peach extrafloral nectar contained six carbohydrates, with sucrose dominant for all cultivars, but extrafloral nectar production varied significantly by cultivar and collection date, with Lovell yielding higher average seasonal volume than the other cultivars. Harmonia axyridis continuously foraged on peach trees lacking prey, and beetle abundance was positively correlated with the number of leaves actively producing extrafloral nectar. In laboratory assays, newly emerged adult beetles preferentially selected and consumed extrafloral nectar of Lovell peach shoots. Furthermore, when prey were initially unavailable to adult H. axyridis, the beetles were sustained by extrafloral nectar and experienced longer survival compared with beetles without the supplemental resource. Collectively, these results suggest that peach extrafloral nectar is a beneficial resource that could potentially sustain H. axyridis in orchards when prey are scarce.


PubMed | Campus Management, Tunis el Manar University, Biobest and Catholic University of Leuven
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of chemical ecology | Year: 2016

To meet their carbohydrate requirements, adult parasitoids exploit a broad range of sugar resources, including floral and extrafloral nectar and honeydew. Although honeydew might be the predominant sugar source, especially in agricultural systems, it often is nutritionally inferior to sugar sources like nectar. Given its broad availability, it may be expected that sugar-feeding insects have evolved specialized adaptations to deal with this typically inferior sugar source. This would apply especially to organisms that have a close association with honeydew producers. Here, we hypothesized that parasitoids of honeydew-producing insects should show a pronounced response to sugars, such as fructose, sucrose, melezitose, and trehalose, and to a lesser extent glucose. To test this hypothesis, we investigated sugar consumption, feeding behavior and survival of the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi on several sugars (equiweight solutions). Our results show that A. ervi adults consumed typical honeydew sugars (sucrose, fructose, trehalose, and melezitose) the most, while consuming considerably less glucose or melibiose. Rhamnose, which does not occur in aphid honeydew, was not, or was only marginally, consumed. When different sugars were provided at the same time, A. ervi adults preferred sucrose or fructose over glucose or melezitose. Furthermore, pre-exposure to sucrose or fructose significantly reduced subsequent intake of glucose, suggesting an acquired distaste for glucose after being previously exposed to highly preferred sugars such as sucrose and fructose. Altogether, this study shows that A. ervi adults prefer sugars (fructose, melezitose, trehalose, and sucrose) that are overrepresented in aphid honeydew and show a lower preference to one (glucose) that is underrepresented in honeydew.


Tena A.,Instituto Valenciano Of Investigaciones Agrarias Ivia | Pekas A.,Biobest | Pekas A.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Wackers F.L.,Biobest | And 2 more authors.
Ecological Entomology | Year: 2013

Adult parasitoids depend on sugar-rich foods such as nectar and honeydew to meet their energy requirements and control insect pests. However, it is poorly known whether parasitoids can detect and feed on honeydew in agroecosystems, where it is the primary carbohydrate source, because this sugar source is less apparent in comparison to nectar and sometimes contains repellent compounds for parasitoids. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses were carried out to test whether Aphytis melinus DeBach (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), a parasitoid whose host does not produce honeydew, feeds on honeydew from non-hosts. In addition, the correlation between the parasitoid's sugar reserves and honeydew abundance was determined. To do this, both the levels of honeydew producers and the sugar levels of individual collected parasitoids were assessed during different seasons. The overall sugar content was treated as an indicator of energy reserves and the erlose-melezitose ratio as an indicator of honeydew feeding. The data show that A. melinus fed commonly on honeydew from non-host hemipterans. More than 50% of the female parasitoids collected in spring and summer had recently fed on honeydew and most of them showed a high sugar content. However, in autumn, when the number of honeydew producers was three times lower than in spring and summer, less than 20% of A. melinus were found to have fed on honeydew, with the average total sugar content being reduced by a factor of three. This study demonstrates that A. melinus commonly feeds on honeydew in the field, even though its host does not produce honeydew. The results also suggest that the exploitation of honeydew by A. melinus is a function of the density and species of honeydew producers. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society.

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