Okayama-shi, Japan
Okayama-shi, Japan

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Takahata M.,Azabu University | Takahata M.,BioBank Co. | Toh H.,Kyushu University | Nakano A.,Azabu University | And 7 more authors.
Animal Science Journal | Year: 2014

Bifidobacterial plasmids reported so far are derived from a limited number of strains and plasmids of bifidobacterial type strains isolated from humans are unknown. We found that Bifidobacterium kashiwanohenseJCM 15439 (type strain) isolated from a healthy infant contained two cryptic plasmids, designated pBBKW-1 and pBBKW-2. We determined and analyzed the complete sequences of both plasmids. pBBKW-1 (7716 bp) was predicted to replicate by a rolling-circle mechanism and encode six protein-coding genes, two of which are putative replication proteins. pBBKW-1 seems to be a cointegrate plasmid containing two copies of the plasmid pMG1 from Bifidobacterium longum. pBBKW-2 (2920 bp) was predicted to encode six protein-coding genes and be a theta-type replicating plasmid, which has been reported to be more stable than a rolling circle-type replicating plasmid frequently found in bifidobacteria. Our finding will provide new insights into safe recombinant plasmid constructions for humans. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.


Miyake Y.,Biobank Company | Roy B.C.,Kinki University | Ando M.,Kinki University | Okada T.,Kinki University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology | Year: 2011

The effects of fasting on the quality of the dorsal and ventral ordinary muscles from cultured Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) during chilled storage were investigated. Tuna were subjected to fasting for 2 days in the summer or 6 days in the winter prior to harvesting. The breaking strength of the dorsal ordinary muscle sampled in the summer increased until 24 h and then decreased. There were no significant differences in the lipid and glycogen content of the ordinary muscle after 9 h of storage between the controls and either fasting group. The pH of the ordinary muscle subjected to summer and winter fasting was higher than in the controls after 24-48 h of storage. However, the relationship between the pH and glycogen content was unclear. The metmyoglobin content during chilled storage was lower in the ordinary muscles from either fasting group than in the controls. In conclusion, fasting for 6 days in the winter improved the color stability of the ordinary muscle without a decline in its lipid content. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Itoh T.,Kinki University | Miyake Y.,BIOBANK Co. | Onda A.,Kinki University | Kubo J.,Kinki University | And 3 more authors.
MicrobiologyOpen | Year: 2012

The objective of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of heat-killed Enterococcus faecalis TH10 (hk-TH10) and its signal transduction on murine macrophage RAW264 cells. RAW264 cells produced nitric oxide (NO) following hk-TH10 treatment. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying hk-TH10-stimulated NO production, we further measured NO production in RAW264 cells treated with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 inhibitor peptide, NF-κB inhibitor, TLR1-siRNA, TLR2-siRNA, and TLR-6 siRNA. Furthermore, the activation of TLR2-TLR1/6 pathway molecules was analyzed by Western blotting. The result of this study showed that hk-TH10 stimulates NO in RAW264 cells through the activation of the TLR2-TLR1/6 pathway. From our findings, we can conclude that hk-TH10 isolated from a traditional side-dish fermented food (tempeh) may facilitate host immunomodulation. © 2012 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Trademark
Biobank Co. | Date: 2010-08-31

Nutritional additives for medical purposes and health maintenance for use in foods and dietary supplements for human consumption; dietary supplements.


Trademark
BioBank Co. | Date: 2011-08-09

Nutritional additives for medical purposes and health maintenance for use in food and dietary supplements for human consumption; dietary supplements.


Omx

Trademark
Biobank Co. | Date: 2011-07-26

Nutritional additives for medical purposes and health maintenance for use in foods and dietary supplements for human consumption; dietary supplements.


Trademark
Biobank Co. | Date: 2013-03-28

Nutritional food additives for medical purposes in the nature of natural food extracts derived from vegetables, fruits, seaweeds and mushrooms; Dietary and nutritional supplements.


Roy B.C.,Kinki University | Miyake Y.,Biobank Co. | Ando M.,Kinki University | Kawasaki K.-I.,Kinki University | Tsukamasa Y.,Kinki University
Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology | Year: 2010

This study was carried out to determine the differences in proximate and fatty acid (FA) compositions in different flesh cuts of the most valuable cephalic portion of cultured (full-cycle), cultured fasted (full-cycle), and wild Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT; Thunnus orientalis). Cultured fasted PBTs were fasted for 6 days to ensure empty stomachs during harvesting and to determine the influence of fasting on the lipid and FA composition in different flesh cuts. Significantly higher lipid contents were observed (p 0.05) in the dorsal akami (lean part) and the ventral o-toro (very fatty part) flesh cuts in cultured and cultured fasted PBTs than in wild ones. However, monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) contents in all flesh cuts were significantly higher in cultured and cultured fasted PBTs than in wild PBT. Wild PBTs contained significantly higher (p 0.05) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents than other cultured PBTs in all flesh cuts except for the dorsal akami and wakaremi (fatty part near dorsal fin) flesh parts, and contained higher n-3 FA content than other PBTsespecially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3)in the lipid fraction from the dorsal chu-toro (medium fatty part), ventral akami, ventral chu-toro, o-toro, and in dark flesh cuts. The flesh quality of cultured or cultured fasted PBTs has the advantage of having a higher total amount of essential FAs than that of wild PBT. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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