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Kita-ku, Japan
Kita-ku, Japan
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Patent
Biobank | Date: 2017-03-01

The invention relates to a method for preparing an osteoconductive bone paste by heating an initial mixture containing an aqueous solution and a granular material including collagen and minerals. A portion of the collagen and the minerals are contained in grains of bone matrix. The initial mixture is heated enough to transform a portion of the collagen into gelatine and thus to obtain a cohesive bone paste having a predefined viscosity.


Patent
Biobank | Date: 2015-04-21

The invention relates to a method for preparing an osteoconductive bone paste by heating an initial mixture containing an aqueous solution and a granular material including collagen and minerals. A portion of the collagen and the minerals are contained in grains of bone matrix. The initial mixture is heated enough to transform a portion of the collagen into gelatine and thus to obtain a cohesive bone paste having a predefined viscosity.


Kosuga M.,Center for Lysosomal Storage Diseases | Nikaido M.,Biobank | Saito S.,Hokkaido Information University | Ohno K.,Chiyoda Corporation | And 2 more authors.
Molecular Genetics and Metabolism | Year: 2016

Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II: also called as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the accumulation of extracellular glycosaminoglycans due to the deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). Previous observations suggested that MPS II can be classified into two distinct disease subtypes: (1) severe type of MPS II involves a decline in the cognitive ability of a patient and (2) attenuated type of MPS II exhibits no such intellectual phenotype. To determine whether such disease subtypes of MPS II could be explained by genetic diagnosis, we analyzed mutations in the IDS gene of 65 patients suffering from MPS II among the Japanese population who were diagnosed with both the accumulation of urinary glycosaminoglycans and a decrease in their IDS enzyme activity between 2004 and 2014. Among the specimens examined, we identified the following mutations: 33 missense, 8 nonsense, 7 frameshift, 4 intronic changes affecting splicing, 8 recombinations involving IDS-IDS2, and 7 other mutations including 4 large deletions. Consistent with the previous data, the results of our study showed that most of the attenuated phenotype was derived from the missense mutations of the IDS gene, whereas mutations associated with a large structural alteration including recombination, splicing, frameshift, and nonsense mutations were linked to the severe phenotype of MPS II. Furthermore, we conducted a homology modeling study of IDS P120R and N534I mutant as representatives of the causative mutation of the severe and attenuated type of MPS II, respectively. We found that the substitution of P120R of the IDS enzyme was predicted to deform the α-helix generated by I119-F123, leading to the major structural alteration of the wild-type IDS enzyme. In sharp contrast, the effect of the structural alteration of N534I was marginal; thus, this mutation was pathogenically predicted to be associated with the attenuated type of MPS II. These results suggest that a combination of the genomic diagnosis of the IDS gene and the structural prediction of the IDS enzyme could enable the prediction of a phenotype more effectively. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Tokyo Electron, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Center for Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Hokkaido Information University and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular genetics and metabolism | Year: 2016

Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II: also called as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the accumulation of extracellular glycosaminoglycans due to the deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). Previous observations suggested that MPS II can be classified into two distinct disease subtypes: (1) severe type of MPS II involves a decline in the cognitive ability of a patient and (2) attenuated type of MPS II exhibits no such intellectual phenotype. To determine whether such disease subtypes of MPS II could be explained by genetic diagnosis, we analyzed mutations in the IDS gene of 65 patients suffering from MPS II among the Japanese population who were diagnosed with both the accumulation of urinary glycosaminoglycans and a decrease in their IDS enzyme activity between 2004 and 2014. Among the specimens examined, we identified the following mutations: 33 missense, 8 nonsense, 7 frameshift, 4 intronic changes affecting splicing, 8 recombinations involving IDS-IDS2, and 7 other mutations including 4 large deletions. Consistent with the previous data, the results of our study showed that most of the attenuated phenotype was derived from the missense mutations of the IDS gene, whereas mutations associated with a large structural alteration including recombination, splicing, frameshift, and nonsense mutations were linked to the severe phenotype of MPS II. Furthermore, we conducted a homology modeling study of IDS P120R and N534I mutant as representatives of the causative mutation of the severe and attenuated type of MPS II, respectively. We found that the substitution of P120R of the IDS enzyme was predicted to deform the -helix generated by I119-F123, leading to the major structural alteration of the wild-type IDS enzyme. In sharp contrast, the effect of the structural alteration of N534I was marginal; thus, this mutation was pathogenically predicted to be associated with the attenuated type of MPS II. These results suggest that a combination of the genomic diagnosis of the IDS gene and the structural prediction of the IDS enzyme could enable the prediction of a phenotype more effectively.


PubMed | Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus, Laboratory of Translational Research, Peterborough City Hospital and Addenbrookes Hospital, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou and 5 more.
Type: | Journal: Oral oncology | Year: 2016

Accurate identification of HPV-driven oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a major issue and none of the current diagnostic approaches is ideal. An in situ hybridization (ISH) assay that detects high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA, called the RNAscope HPV-test, has been recently developed. Studies have suggested that this assay may become a standard to define HPV-status.To further assess this test, we compared its performance against the strategies that are used in routine clinical practice: p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a single test and algorithms combining p16-IHC with HPV-DNA identification by PCR (algorithm-1) or ISH (algorithm-2).105 OPC specimens were analyzed. The prevalence of HPV-positive samples varied considerably: 67% for p16-IHC, 54% for algorithm-1, 61% for algorithm-2 and 59% for the RNAscope HPV-test. Discrepancies between the RNAscope HPV-test and p16-IHC, algorithm-1 and 2 were noted in respectively 13.3%, 13.1%, and 8.6%. The 4 diagnostic strategies were able to identify 2 groups with different prognosis according to HPV-status, as expected. However, the greater survival differential was observed with the RNAscope HPV-test [HR: 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07-0.51, p=0.001] closely followed by algorithm-1 (HR: 0.23, 95% CI, 0.08-0.66, p=0.006) and algorithm-2 (HR: 0.26, 95% CI, 0.1-0.65, p=0.004). In contrast, a weaker association was found when p16-IHC was used as a single test (HR: 0.33, 95% CI, 0.13-0.81, p=0.02).Our findings suggest that the RNAscope HPV-test and p16-based algorithms perform better that p16 alone to identify OPC that are truly driven by HPV-infection. The RNAscope HPV-test has the advantage of being a single test.


Mirghani H.,Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus | Casiraghi O.,Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus | Amen F.,Peterborough City Hospital | He M.,Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. | And 11 more authors.
Modern Pathology | Year: 2015

Accurate screening of HPV-driven head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a critical issue. Although there are commercial direct and indirect assays for HPV-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, none are ideal. Recently, a novel RNA in situ hybridization test (the RNAscope HPV-test) has been developed for the detection of high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. However, validation of this assay against the 'gold standard' (identification of high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA in fresh-frozen tissue by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR) has only been reported by one team. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from 50 patients with tonsil or tongue base carcinoma were tested using the RNAscope HPV-test, p16 immunohistochemistry, and chromogenic in situ hybridization for high-risk HPV-DNA. The results were compared with those of qRT-PCR on matched fresh-frozen samples. Compared with the reference test, the sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of the RNAscope HPV-test and of p16 immunohistochemistry were 93%, 94%, 96%, 88% and 96%, 93%, 96%, and 93%, respectively. Five cases were discrepant between the RNAscope HPV-test and p16-immunohistochemisrty. The RNAscope HPV-test demonstrated excellent analytical performance against the 'gold standard' and is easier to interpret than chromogenic in situ hybridization. p16-immunohistochemistry also performed very well, however its main weakness is that it is an indirect marker of the presence of HPV. These data suggest that the RNAscope HPV-test is a promising test that could be developed as a clinical standard for the precise identification of HPV-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. © 2015 USCAP, Inc.


PubMed | Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus, Laboratory of Translational Research, Peterborough City Hospital and Addenbrookes Hospital, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc | Year: 2015

Accurate screening of HPV-driven head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a critical issue. Although there are commercial direct and indirect assays for HPV-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, none are ideal. Recently, a novel RNA in situ hybridization test (the RNAscope HPV-test) has been developed for the detection of high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. However, validation of this assay against the gold standard (identification of high-risk HPV E6/E7 mRNA in fresh-frozen tissue by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR) has only been reported by one team. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples from 50 patients with tonsil or tongue base carcinoma were tested using the RNAscope HPV-test, p16 immunohistochemistry, and chromogenic in situ hybridization for high-risk HPV-DNA. The results were compared with those of qRT-PCR on matched fresh-frozen samples. Compared with the reference test, the sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of the RNAscope HPV-test and of p16 immunohistochemistry were 93%, 94%, 96%, 88% and 96%, 93%, 96%, and 93%, respectively. Five cases were discrepant between the RNAscope HPV-test and p16-immunohistochemisrty. The RNAscope HPV-test demonstrated excellent analytical performance against the gold standard and is easier to interpret than chromogenic in situ hybridization. p16-immunohistochemistry also performed very well, however its main weakness is that it is an indirect marker of the presence of HPV. These data suggest that the RNAscope HPV-test is a promising test that could be developed as a clinical standard for the precise identification of HPV-driven oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.


PubMed | Helmholtz Center Munich, Medical University of Graz, University of Manchester, Institute Pasteur Paris and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Science translational medicine | Year: 2014

A calculation grid developed by an international expert group was tested across biobanks in six countries to evaluate costs for collections of various types of biospecimens. The assessment yielded a tool for setting specimen-access prices that were transparently related to biobank costs, and the tool was applied across three models of collaborative partnership.


Takahata M.,BIOBANK | Fremont M.,VF Bioscience | Desreumaux P.,University of Lille Nord de France | Desreumaux P.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2014

Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium serves as a model to study human intestinal infections. C. rodentium infection leads to increased production of inflammatory cytokines, immune cell infiltration and damage to the gut barrier. We used this model of colitis to evaluate the therapeutic properties of OM-X®, an extract prepared by fermentation of vegetables, seaweeds, fruits and mushrooms. Administration of OM-X® to C. rodentium-infected mice reduced damage to the intestinal epithelium, lowered inflammation scores, increased IL-10 expression and maintained FoxP3 gene expression. OM-X® also partially prevented bacterial translocation, increased expression of tight junction genes and increased proliferation of epithelial cells. PCR analysis of stool samples showed that OM-X® significantly reduced the populations of bacteria harboring buk gene (mostly Clostridium species). It is suggested that alterations of microbiota composition, following OM-X® consumption, contribute to protection against infection and epithelial damage, and lead to an increased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. © 2014 The Authors.


Tellier C.,University of Namur | Desmet D.,University of Namur | Petit L.,University of Leuven Medical School | Finet L.,Biobank | And 4 more authors.
Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2015

Abnormal architecture of the tumor blood network, as well as heterogeneous erythrocyte flow, leads to temporal fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension exposing tumor and stromal cells to cycling hypoxia. Inflammation is another feature of tumor microenvironment and is considered as a new enabling characteristic of tumor progression. As cycling hypoxia is known to participate in tumor aggressiveness, the purpose of this study was to evaluate its role in tumor-promoting inflammation. Firstly, we assessed the impact of cycling hypoxia in vitro on endothelial inflammatory response induced by tumor necrosis factor α. Results showed that endothelial cells exposed to cycling hypoxia displayed an amplified proinflammatory phenotype, characterized by an increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8; by an increased expression of adhesion molecules, in particular intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); and consequently by an increase in THP-1 monocyte adhesion. This exacerbation of endothelial inflammatory phenotype occurs through nuclear factor-κB overactivation. Secondly, the role of cycling hypoxia was studied on overall tumor inflammation in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Results showed that cycling hypoxia led to an enhanced inflammation in tumors as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), IL-6, CXCL1 (C-X-C motif ligand 1), and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (murine IL-8 functional homologs) mRNA expression was increased and as a higher leukocyte infiltration was evidenced. Furthermore, cycling hypoxia-specific inflammatory phenotype, characterized by a simultaneous (baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing 5)(low)/PTGS2(high)/ICAM-1(high)/IL-6(high)/IL-8(high) expression, is associated with a poor prognosis in human colon cancer. This new phenotype could thus be used in clinic to more precisely define prognosis for colon cancer patients. In conclusion, our findings evidenced for the first time the involvement of cycling hypoxia in tumor-promoting inflammation amplification. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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