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Arwin H.,Linköping University | Magnusson R.,Linköping University | Garcia-Caurel E.,Ecole Polytechnique - Palaiseau | Fallet C.,Bioaxial | And 4 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2015

Spectral Mueller matrices measured at multiple angles of incidence as well as Mueller matrix images are recorded on the exoskeletons (cuticles) of the scarab beetles Cetonia aurata and Chrysina argenteola. Cetonia aurata is green whereas Chrysina argenteola is gold-colored. When illuminated with natural (unpolarized) light, both species reflect left-handed and near-circularly polarized light originating from helicoidal structures in their cuticles. These structures are referred to as circular Bragg reflectors. For both species the Mueller matrices are found to be nondiagonal depolarizers. The matrices are Cloude decomposed to a sum of non-depolarizing matrices and it is found that the cuticle optical response, in a first approximation can be described as a sum of Mueller matrices from an ideal mirror and an ideal circular polarizer with relative weights determined by the eigenvalues of the covariance matrices of the measured Mueller matrices. The spectral and image decompositions are consistent with each other. A regression-based decomposition of the spectral and image Mueller matrices is also presented whereby the basic optical components are assumed to be a mirror and a circular polarizer as suggested by the Cloude decomposition. The advantage with a regression decomposition compared to a Cloude decomposition is its better stability as the matrices in the decomposition are determined a priori. The origin of the depolarizing features are discussed but from present data it is not possible to conclude whether the two major components, the mirror and the circular polarizer are laterally separated in domains in the cuticle or if the depolarization originates from the intrinsic properties of the helicoidal structure. © 2015 Optical Society of America.


Rosen S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Sirat G.Y.,Bioaxial | Ilan H.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Agranat A.J.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Optics Express | Year: 2013

In this paper we present a scheme for the acquisition of high temporal resolution images of single particles with enhanced lateral localization accuracy. The scheme, which is implementable as a part of the illumination system of a standard confocal microscope, is based on the generation of a vector beam that is manipulated by polarimetry techniques to create a set of illumination PSFs with different spatial profiles. The combination of data collected in different illumination states enables the extraction of spatial information obscured by diffraction in the standard imaging system. An implementation of the scheme based on the utilization of the unique phenomenon of conical diffraction is presented, and the basic strategy it provides for enhanced localization in the diffraction limited region is demonstrated. ©2013 Optical Society of America.


Fallet C.,Bioaxial | Irat G.Y.S.,Bioaxial
Optics Letters | Year: 2016

Vortex beams are plagued by the intrinsic chromaticity of the physical phenomenon used to generate them. To the authors' best knowledge, attempts to generate them in a broad spectral range remain quite scarce and limited in their results. Crystal optics and especially conical diffraction (CD) (or refraction) intrinsically create achromatic vortices. The vortex is created by a wavelength-independent topological charge, embedded directly in the Fresnel equations. However, for biaxial crystals of low crystallographic symmetry, which includes all crystals used practically for CD, the dispersion of the binormal axiscre-ates a chromaticity effect. In this Letter, wepropose a new way to compensate this dispersion of the binormal axis of a biaxial crystalin order to generate white-light vortex beams by CD in a 250 nm spectral range, covering almost all the visible range. Theadvantages of the ability touse CD in a wide spectral range vastly exceed the sole generation of vortex beams. © 2016 Optical Society of America.


Fallet C.,Bioaxial | Lindberg A.,Bioaxial | Sirat G.Y.,Bioaxial
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2016

Recent developments have shown that conical diffraction by a biaxial crystal can create a vortex beam for use in 2D STED microscopy. It has been shown that this concept can be extended and also generate the depletion distributions used for 3D STED microscopy. A single beam passes through a biaxial crystal that creates two co-propagating, co-localized beams; the first one is used for lateral depletion, and the other one for axial depletion. The two beams are crossed-polarized and thus do not interfere. We will show that the 3D distribution can be made achromatic, i.e. several depletion wavelengths can travel through a common path and still be shaped into the appropriate pattern by optimizing the geometry of the system. This system enables true one-channel 3D depletion at multiple wavelengths ranging from 580nm to 770nm, thus covering most of the conventional depletion wavelengths currently used. Preliminary results of depletion PSFs will be presented and the advantages and limitations of this system will be discussed as well as the experimental considerations required to successfully obtain the desired PSFs. © 2016 SPIE.


Patent
Bioaxial | Date: 2013-04-11

The invention relates to an optical measurement method and to an optical measurement device for determining the spatial or spatiotemporal distribution of a sample, the sample comprising at least one retransmission source, said at least one retransmission source retransmitting light depending on the projected light, according to a predetermined law, onto the sample, the method comprising: the projection onto the sample of at least two compact light distributions belonging to different topological families, which propagate along the same optical path, the detection of the light retransmitted by said at least one retransmission source of the sample; the generation of at least one optical image from the detected light; and the algorithmic analysis of the optical images for obtaining location data on said at least one retransmission source.


An optical method of measurement and an optical apparatus for determining the spatial position of at least one luminous object on a sample. A sequence of at least two compact luminous distributions of different topological families is projected onto the sample, and light re-emitted by the luminous object is detected. At least one optical image is generated for each luminous distribution on the basis of the light detected. The optical images are analyzed to obtain spatiotemporal information regarding the light re-emitted by the luminous object, or location of the luminous object. An optimal sequence of compact light distributions may be determined on the basis of at least one of a positioning hypothesis and a first set of measures;


Trademark
Bioaxial | Date: 2014-05-28

Scientific apparatus and instruments, namely microscopes, data processing apparatus, mathematical instruments and lasers not for medical use; optical apparatus and instruments, namely diffraction apparatus, polarimeters and refractors; apparatus and instruments for measuring, namely measuring apparatus and precision measuring apparatus; data processing equipment; software (recorded programs), namely software for the acquisition and processing of images; diagnostic apparatus not for medical use. Evaluation and estimation in the fields of science and technology provided by engineers; scientific and technical research; design and development of software; technical project study; development (design), installation, maintenance, updating or rental of software; design of computer systems, namely design of systems for acquiring and processing of images; server hosting, namely hosting of computer servers.


Trademark
Bioaxial | Date: 2014-05-28

Scientific apparatus and instruments, namely microscopes, data processing apparatus, mathematical instruments and lasers not for medical use; optical apparatus and instruments, namely diffraction apparatus, polarimeters and refractors; apparatus and instruments for measuring, namely measuring apparatus and precision measuring apparatus; data processing equipment; software (recorded programs), namely software for the acquisition and processing of images; diagnostic apparatus not for medical use. Evaluation and estimation in the fields of science and technology provided by engineers; scientific and technical research; design and development of software; technical project study; development (design), installation, maintenance, updating or rental of software; design of computer systems, namely design of systems for acquiring and processing of images; server hosting, namely hosting of computer servers.


News Article | November 27, 2013
Site: www.finsmes.com

Bioaxial, a Paris, France-based developer of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy for the extended imaging of live cells, completed a €1.9m ($2.7m) equity funding. Backers included Amorcage Technologique Investissement (a fund managed by CEA Investissement), Inserm Transfert Initiative and Viveris Management and other individual investors. The company intends to use the funds to launch its first product, an optical microscopy module, which is expected in the second half of 2014. Founded in 2010 by by Gabriel Sirat and Louis-Philippe Braitbart (CEO), Bioaxial is developing imaging instruments for fluorescence microscopy that allow extended imaging of live cells with an improved resolution. Tested at the Institut Pasteur for the last 12 months, the company’s module allows observation of living cells in super-resolution over time without damaging them and adapt as an add-on for commercial microscopes. Bioaxial, which has filed four patents and has acquired a fifth, currently employs five people.

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