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Bina Technologies | Date: 2013-04-23

The present disclosure provides systems and methods for nucleic acid sequence analysis. A system for processing raw nucleic acid sequence data from a genomic sequencer comprises a data processing server having a housing contained therein one or more processing modules. The one or more processing modules can each comprise an electronic control unit programmed to align nucleic acid sequence data from a genomic sequencing device and perform one or more of variant analysis and structural variant analysis on the nucleic acid sequence data. The system can further comprise a computer server in communication with the processing server. The computer server can be programmed or otherwise configured to process and/or analyze the aligned nucleic acid sequence data.


News Article | August 19, 2013
Site: gigaom.com

Bina Technologies, the Palo Alto, Calif.-based startup selling a specialized appliance for analyzing genomic data, is trying to reach a broader group of users by giving appliances to universities on a pay-per-use basis. Bina, which launched in 2012, sells a product called the Bina Genomic Analysis Platform. It’s a box full of hardware and algorithms designed to run optimally together, a pairing the company says allows the Bina platform to be faster and more thorough than alternative methods. The Stanford genetics department is using a Bina appliance, founder and CEO Narges Bani Asadi told me, and has improved its turnaround time on analyzing a single genome by 100 times. “The same operation [that used to take a week or more] takes a couple hours on the Bina platform,” she said. However, not every university has the budget or workload to justify buying an appliance upfront (or paying for a monthly all-you-can use subscription, which is how Bina is sold). Thus the new on-demand option. The way it works, SVP of Business Development Mark Sutherland explained, is similar to having a Coke machine at a university or research institution. It doesn’t cost anything to have it there, but people pay when they need something from it. It’s a model that makes quite a bit of sense. If you consider a university where numerous researchers might be working on different research under different grants, it’s likely no single researcher would need a dedicated appliance. Now, they can use it when they need it and, at the month’s end, only pay for the work they actually performed. If there’s one catch, it’s that Bina expects a minimum number of jobs to run each month in order for it to make money on the arrangement. But, Sutherland said, Bina will leave appliances in place for at least six months at institutions choosing the on-demand offering, in the hopes that usage will pick up as more people realize it’s there and learn how to best utilize it. The on-demand boxes will begin shipping in about four weeks, he noted, and the company already has a few customers lined up. In the coming year or two as privacy issues resolve themselves, Bani Asadi told me, Bina will probably offer the platform as a cloud service that will let researchers store and analyze sequenced genes on hosted resources. Bina is also expanding the utility of its platform to support exome analysis, something Bani Asadi said should help ensure that on-demand customers are finding enough opportunities to use it. Previously, Bina has only supported whole-genome analysis (“We started by solving the most-difficult problem,” Bani Asadi noted), which means a lot more data, a lot more time and a lot more cost. Exomes, which are the coding portions of genes, are only 1 to 2 percent of the whole, but can provide valuable information on about 85 percent of known genetic conditions, she explained. The majority of genomic research right now is exome analysis, she added, with whole-genome analysis ideally saved for specialized research, cancer analysis or other complex cases. And because exome analysis generates so much less data and takes so much less time, researchers can analyze the same exome many times to ensure accurate results. Genomic research, of course, is going to be a major source of data generation going forward — each genome can result in terabytes of data once analyzed, and it’s getting cheaper and easier to sequence them. Researchers and regulatory bodies will have to balance a wide range of concerns in this space, including tradeoffs between privacy and innovation, and the economics of whether it’s best to analyze data on-premises or in the cloud. It seems we’ll need to see a lot more innovation on the business side of things, similar to what Bina is doing, to account for all the considerations at play. Here’s a video of Bani Asadi discussing the vision of Bina at our Structure conference in June.


News Article | December 22, 2014
Site: www.fiercemedicaldevices.com

Roche ($RHHBY) snatched up DNA sequencing outfit Bina Technologies for an undisclosed sum, continuing its M&A winning streak and expanding its diagnostics footprint. Through the acquisition, the Swiss company will gain access to Bina's Genomic Management Solution, the Bina-GMS, an innovative system that helps cut down time and costs associated with genomic sequencing. Bina will be integrated into Roche's Sequencing Unit, and the companies will work together to beef up product development and commercialization for Bina's analytic tool. "The acquisition of Bina is a significant step for Roche to enable the promise of personalized healthcare by delivering the highest quality genomic data possible," Dan Zabrowski, head of Roche Sequencing, said in a statement. "Informatics and data management are critical to providing a seamless, end-to-end sequencing solution. Bina's products are designed to improve the efficiency and value of genomic analysis, and the company continues to develop new methodologies and algorithms that link NGS data to disease-relevant genetic markers." The acquisition bodes well for Bina as it ramps up development for its Bina-GMS system. In October, the Redwood City, CA-based company won a $1 million contract with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) to provide whole genome, whole exome and SNP Chip DNA data analysis for the VA's Million Veteran Program. Roche and Bina plan to launch similar big-data population studies and expand their offerings for global enterprise and clinical research customers, the companies said in a statement. Meanwhile, Roche is forging ahead with meaningful M&A and charting progress in the med tech and diagnostic arenas. Earlier this month, the company snagged prenatal testing outfit Ariosa Diagnostics for an undisclosed sum to get its hands on the company's innovative screening tool. Ariosa's Harmony test can detect genetic abnormalities such as Down syndrome as early as 10 weeks into pregnancy. Last week, Roche snagged AvanSci Bio's tissue dissection technology for the analysis of tumors, beefing up its product offerings and furthering its recent diagnostics push. The company plans to test AvanSci's tissue dissection system at select sites in 2015 as part of a development program for a next-generation version of the product. Related Articles: Roche launches point-of-care, PCR molecular diagnostic system from $450M deal for iQuum Roche scoops up AvanSci Bio tissue dissection technology to bolster molecular Dx offerings Roche dives into prenatal Dx space with Ariosa purchase Bina adds exome analysis to Big Data genomics platform


PLEASANTON, Calif. & REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bina Technologies, Inc., a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), and AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN) today announced that they have entered into an agreement for AstraZeneca to become the first member to join the Bina Alliance Program and to further develop the Bina Genomic Management Solution (GMS)1. AstraZeneca will utilize the Bina GMS as an enterprise platform to support its development work across three main therapeutic areas: oncology, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, and respiratory, inflammation and autoimmunity. Bina’s proprietary technology enables translational and academic researchers to perform fast and scalable analyses to maximize the value of genomic data. Under the terms of the agreement, AstraZeneca will adopt Bina GMS globally to support enterprise genomic data analysis and management. Bina in turn will provide AstraZeneca with direct access to its scientific and engineering teams to further develop the Bina GMS for pharmaceutical applications. Dr. Carl Barrett, Vice President, Translational Oncology, at AstraZeneca, said: “Bina GMS is a powerful data analysis platform that will help AstraZeneca leverage more effectively genomic data across all phases of our research globally as we develop personalized therapies to treat complex diseases.” Justin Johnson, Principal Translational Genomic Scientist at AstraZeneca, added: “In working with Bina, we can not only significantly accelerate the speed in which we incorporate genomic data into areas like target discovery and patient selection, but we can do this on top of a flexible, scalable and validated analysis infrastructure that our bench scientists can work with.” Johnson will be presenting early results of the collaboration during the Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s 14th Annual Bio-IT World Conference and Expo (Bio-IT) in Boston, MA on Thursday 23 April. “We are very excited about the work we are doing with the AstraZeneca team,” said Dr. Narges Bani Asadi, CEO and Founder of Bina. “In this collaboration, our multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers will try to push the boundaries of genomics research. We are very fortunate to be able to contribute to the research at AstraZeneca. Through this collaboration we both hope to define a new standard for the pharmaceutical research industry in how to effectively leverage the genomic information for discovery and development.” For more information on the Bina Alliance Program, please contact bizdev@bina.com. Academic researchers please visit the Bina Research Grant Program. 1 Bina products are for research use only and not for use in diagnostic procedures. Bina Technologies builds next-generation technologies for scalable, accurate processing and management of genomic information. Bina’s Genomic Management Solution is a comprehensive analysis platform used by clinical and translational researchers to gain insight from their genomic data sets. Bina’s Genomic Management Solution dramatically decreases the complexity, time, and cost of genomic analysis, accelerating the science of personalized medicine. Bina Technologies was acquired by Roche in December, 2014. Learn more about Bina’s product, technologies, and team at www.bina.com. Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience. Roche is also the world leader in in vitro diagnostics and tissue-based cancer diagnostics, and a frontrunner in diabetes management. Roche’s personalised healthcare strategy aims at providing medicines and diagnostics that enable tangible improvements in the health, quality of life and survival of patients. Founded in 1896, Roche has been making important contributions to global health for more than a century. Twenty-four medicines developed by Roche are included in the World Health Organisation Model Lists of Essential Medicines, among them life-saving antibiotics, antimalarials and chemotherapy. In 2013 the Roche Group employed over 85,000 people worldwide, invested 8.7 billion Swiss francs in R&D and posted sales of 46.8 billion Swiss francs. Genentech, in the United States, is a wholly owned member of the Roche Group. Roche is the majority shareholder in Chugai Pharmaceutical, Japan. For more information, please visit www.roche.com. All trademarks used or mentioned in this release are protected by law. AstraZeneca is a global, innovation-driven biopharmaceutical business that focuses on the discovery, development and commercialisation of prescription medicines, primarily for the treatment of cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory, inflammation, autoimmune, oncology, infection and neuroscience diseases. AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. For more information please visit: www.astrazeneca.com


News Article | May 21, 2012
Site: gigaom.com

According to some doomsayers — such as engineering professor and entrepreneur Steve Blank in a recent interview with The Atlantic — innovation is dead and Silicon Valley is just a muck pond full of VC money where social media companies breed and reproduce like mosquitoes. They’re partially right, of course, but they’re also missing the bigger picture. Much of Silicon Valley’s most-innovative efforts might be coming out of Google and Elon Musk’s mind, as Blank says, but cloud computing has made innovation something anyone can do. Todd Hoff of High Scalability took up for today’s startups against Blank in a post on Monday detailing Pinterest’s phenomal growth and growing Amazon Web Services-based infrastructure. Here’s what he had to say to the naysayers: While it’s true that both Pinterest and Instagram are not making great advances in science and technology, that is more indicator of the easy power of today’s commodity environments rather than a sign of Silicon Valley’s lack of innovation. The numbers are so huge and the valuations are so high we naturally want some sort of fundamental technological revolution to underlie their growth. The revolution is more subtle. It really is just that easy to attain such growth these days, if you can execute on the right idea. Get used to it. What Hoff didn’t say by name, but surely meant, is that cloud computing has changed the name of the game. Yeah, there are a lot of Instagrams and Pinterests out there, but there are also companies such as DNAnexus and Bina Technologies that are using the cloud (combined with the advent of big data technologies) as a platform for revolutionizing genomic research.  It’s just an iPhone app, but Romanian startup SkinScan is trying to alert users to potentially cancerous moles. This trend is only getting started as cloud infrastructure gets more powerful and entrepreneurs begin to fully understand what’s possible if they take advantage of it. Somewhere in between Pinterest and biotech, startups are using the cloud to make enterprise software available as a service and disrupt the business models of the very companies that helped build Silicon Valley. Even if social media companies do dominate the startup landscape, they’re part of a fundamental change in the way mankind communicates with each other thanks to cloud-based computing resources and the ubiquity of powerful mobile devices. I would argue Facebook is a very big idea — and an engineering marvel in terms of its infrastructure — and surrounding startups are part of an evolving ecosystem. It’s not trying to cure cancer, but it’s still rather profound. And if you’re trying to make money, who wouldn’t make a small bet on a business that can scale like crazy overnight in terms of both users and infrastructure? One might argue it’s smart investments in companies such as Pinterest and Instagram that help bankroll longer-term investments in the big-idea startups, which are still around, by the way. We have startups such as Calxeda, SeaMicro (now part of AMD) and Tilera trying to revolutionize chips, and we have a bunch of so-called “phat startups” — especially in cleantech — undertaking the types of efforts Blank says are dwindling. I recently covered a startup called Skybox that raised $70 million to build and launch satellites, and will then analyze the the continuous stream of high-resolution images they send back. We’ll talk a lot about infrastructure and platforms at our upcoming Structure conference, because it’s the underpinning for this new ecosystem of applications that resides on top of it. Those apps range from the mundane to the revolutionary, but there’s a whole lot of innovation to come as the world gets a better sense of what’s possible in an always-on and interconnected world. I wouldn’t call that a small idea.


News Article | March 27, 2013
Site: www.finsmes.com

The company intends to use the funds to expand their development, marketing, sales and support teams. Founded in 2011 by Narges Bani Asadi, CEO, Bina provides a big data science platform which aims to accelerate personalized medicine for researchers and clinicians requiring fast, accurate and scalable genomic analysis. . The company is also announcing a partnership with Dr. Elizabeth Worthey at the Medical College of Wisconsin focusing on accelerating newborn whole genome sequencing and screening in the neonatal intensive care unit. In addition, the Genetics Department of Stanford University led by Dr. Michael Snyder joined as an official customer.


PLEASANTON, Calif. & REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bina Technologies, Inc., a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), and AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN) today announced that they have entered into an agreement for AstraZeneca to become the first member to join the Bina Alliance Program and to further develop the Bina Genomic Management Solution (GMS)1. AstraZeneca will utilize the Bina GMS as an enterprise platform to support its development work across three main therapeutic areas: oncology, cardiovascular and metabolic disease, and respiratory, inflammation and autoimmunity. Bina’s proprietary technology enables translational and academic researchers to perform fast and scalable analyses to maximize the value of genomic data. Under the terms of the agreement, AstraZeneca will adopt Bina GMS globally to support enterprise genomic data analysis and management. Bina in turn will provide AstraZeneca with direct access to its scientific and engineering teams to further develop the Bina GMS for pharmaceutical applications. Dr. Carl Barrett, Vice President, Translational Oncology, at AstraZeneca, said: “Bina GMS is a powerful data analysis platform that will help AstraZeneca leverage more effectively genomic data across all phases of our research globally as we develop personalized therapies to treat complex diseases.” Justin Johnson, Principal Translational Genomic Scientist at AstraZeneca, added: “In working with Bina, we can not only significantly accelerate the speed in which we incorporate genomic data into areas like target discovery and patient selection, but we can do this on top of a flexible, scalable and validated analysis infrastructure that our bench scientists can work with.” Johnson will be presenting early results of the collaboration during the Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s 14th Annual Bio-IT World Conference and Expo (Bio-IT) in Boston, MA on Thursday 23 April. “We are very excited about the work we are doing with the AstraZeneca team,” said Dr. Narges Bani Asadi, CEO and Founder of Bina. “In this collaboration, our multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers will try to push the boundaries of genomics research. We are very fortunate to be able to contribute to the research at AstraZeneca. Through this collaboration we both hope to define a new standard for the pharmaceutical research industry in how to effectively leverage the genomic information for discovery and development.” For more information on the Bina Alliance Program, please contact bizdev@bina.com. Academic researchers please visit the Bina Research Grant Program. 1 Bina products are for research use only and not for use in diagnostic procedures. Bina Technologies builds next-generation technologies for scalable, accurate processing and management of genomic information. Bina’s Genomic Management Solution is a comprehensive analysis platform used by clinical and translational researchers to gain insight from their genomic data sets. Bina’s Genomic Management Solution dramatically decreases the complexity, time, and cost of genomic analysis, accelerating the science of personalized medicine. Bina Technologies was acquired by Roche in December, 2014. Learn more about Bina’s product, technologies, and team at www.bina.com. Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience. Roche is also the world leader in in vitro diagnostics and tissue-based cancer diagnostics, and a frontrunner in diabetes management. Roche’s personalised healthcare strategy aims at providing medicines and diagnostics that enable tangible improvements in the health, quality of life and survival of patients. Founded in 1896, Roche has been making important contributions to global health for more than a century. Twenty-four medicines developed by Roche are included in the World Health Organisation Model Lists of Essential Medicines, among them life-saving antibiotics, antimalarials and chemotherapy. In 2013 the Roche Group employed over 85,000 people worldwide, invested 8.7 billion Swiss francs in R&D and posted sales of 46.8 billion Swiss francs. Genentech, in the United States, is a wholly owned member of the Roche Group. Roche is the majority shareholder in Chugai Pharmaceutical, Japan. For more information, please visit www.roche.com. All trademarks used or mentioned in this release are protected by law. AstraZeneca is a global, innovation-driven biopharmaceutical business that focuses on the discovery, development and commercialisation of prescription medicines, primarily for the treatment of cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory, inflammation, autoimmune, oncology, infection and neuroscience diseases. AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. For more information please visit: www.astrazeneca.com


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/zs7bb5/artificial) has announced the addition of the "Artificial Intelligence for Enterprise Applications - Deep Learning, Predictive Computing, Image Recognition, Speech Recognition, and Other AI Technologies for Enterprise Markets: Global Market Analysis and Forecasts" report to their offering. AI technologies are already being used in a number of different industries including online advertising services, automotive, agriculture, consumer finance, data storage, education, investment, healthcare, law, manufacturing, media, medical diagnostics, oil and gas, philanthropies, and retail. Systems modeled on the human brain such as deep learning are being applied to tasks as varied as question-answering medical diagnostic systems, credit scoring, program trading, fraud detection, product recommendations, image classification, speech recognition, language translation, and self-driving vehicles. The author forecasts that the market for AI systems for enterprise applications will increase from $202.5 million in 2015 to $11.1 billion by 2024, expanding at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 56.1%. This report examines the practical application of artificial intelligence within commercial enterprises. The technologies covered include cognitive computing, deep learning, machine learning, predictive APIs, natural language processing, image recognition, and speech recognition. The report presents 10-year forecasts for AI software, along with AI-driven services and hardware sales, for the period from 2015 through 2024. Forecasts are segmented by world region as well as by technology and industry application. The study also includes detailed profiles of more than 30 key industry players. Research and Markets is the world's leading source for international market research reports and market data. We provide you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies, new products and the latest trends.


News Article | December 23, 2014
Site: www.finsmes.com

The financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Backed by Sierra Ventures and AME Cloud Ventures and led by Narges Bani Asadi, Founder and CEO, Bina Technologies provides a big data platform for centralized management and processing of next generation sequencing (NGS) data. Its proprietary on-market Genomic Management Solution, Bina-GMS1, which allows basic, translational and academic researchers to perform scalable analyses to maximize the value of genomic data. The acquisition will enable Bina to accelerate product development and global commercialization of its Bina-GMS as an enterprise software system supporting multiple sequencing technologies while developing a solution for Roche sequencing systems. Roche will also continue to grow Bina’s interdisciplinary team of bioinformatics scientists, computer scientists and software engineers.  It will be integrated into Roche Sequencing Unit in Q1 2015 and will continue to focus on expanding its innovative genomic analysis solutions portfolio.


News Article | June 21, 2013
Site: gigaom.com

I have recently read two posts that point to lack of innovation in Silicon Valley. Sam Altman (a founder of Loopt) wrote a pretty persuasive essay on his blog called, “What happened to innovation”. He looks at the venture investment trends and points to declining risk tolerance among Silicon Valley investors. Here is a tiny excerpt, but read the original in its entirety: …what’s happened is that innovative energy has mostly been directed to short-timeframe opportunities in software.  This is at least mostly rational—honestly, over the last few decades there have just been way more successes in the computer industry than in biotech, cleantech. And now we get to the fundamental issue with innovation today. People—founders, employees, and investors—are looking for low-cost (and virtual is lower cost than physical), short-term opportunities. Elsewhere, Slate technology writer Farhad Manjoo noted, in his piece, “Attack of the Clones”: Manjoo & Altman are right and wrong at the same time. I don’t disagree with the basic thrust of their arguments that there is a certain near-termism and me-tooism. In fact, it is something we have talked about many times. What I disagree with is the handwringing about innovation. Why? because they are looking at the world through a very narrow lens of consumer applications and platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Android and Apple’s iOS. When I look at the technology ecosystem, I look far and wide. I take off the covers and peek inside. I marvel not just at Instagram, but I marvel at innovation that Apple has packed inside the iPhone and its laptops. Did you know that Apple has employed some of the top material scientists who work with other Apple engineers and help craft together the MacBook Pro or the iPhone 5? The material science isn’t all that exciting to some but to us it isn’t incremental work (and we just hired a writer to follow those developments). I look at those videos Apple puts out about how its computers are made, and I get excited — because I see old fashioned engineering & tinkering at work to make my computing experience even more beautiful. And why stop at Apple? A chip company that is rethinking the mobile phone camera — innovative or not innovative? A company using artificial intelligence to bring about predictive computing… innovative or not innovative? How about that chip startup that has come up with a new way of making chips that sip instead of gulping power. Is that interesting and innovative? Yesterday, at our Structure 2013 conference, Narges Bina Asadi talked about her company, Bina Technologies — which is making a high performance computing appliance that is used for genonmic analysis that will eventually result in customized treatments and data-driven insights tailored to you and I. I find these companies innovative, but you decide for yourself. I know none of these companies are sexy like Instagram or have the 30-seconds-to-get-it factor, but they are important. The reason why people talk about a lack of innovation in Silicon Valley is because we have become used to looking at our ecosystem through a single lens — the more popular, more easy to grok world of consumer apps. So if you say that business resembles a dried sewer in a shanty town, then I am with you.

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