Ankara, Turkey
Ankara, Turkey

Bilkent University, or Bilkent, is the first private university of Turkey, located in Ankara, with the fundamental aim of creating a center of excellence in higher education and research. The name "Bilkent" exemplifies this aim, since it is an acronym of "bilim kenti": Turkish for "city of science".Bilkent University is among the 226th to 250th best universities in the world and 1st in Turkey according to Times Higher Education World University Rankings of the world's top universities for 2012. Bilkent is ranked as the 32nd best university in the world for 2012 in the category "100 best universities under the age of 50" by Times Higher Education, making it one of the best educational institutions in Eurasia. It is also the only university in Turkey that is ranked in top 100 in a subject list, being ranked 98th in the World in Engineering and Technology in 2014. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.67M | Year: 2017

When the transfer of modern sciences to and the study of the Black Sea Region (BSR) began in the late 18. century, this area was not yet considered part of Europe. The proposed inter/multidisciplinary research and exchange projects title refers to that fact. Knowledge and science exchange between Europe and the BSR intensified in the course of the 19th and early 20th century and was interrupted when as result of WWI/WWII a significant part of the BSR was integrated into the Soviet Unions orbit. The BSR disappeared behind the Iron Curtain and the academic cultures of West and East drifted apart. The previous 25 years have witnessed strengthening ties between BSR countries and between the BSR and the rest of Europe as well as globalisation of knowledge and scientific exchange. The integration of the BSR into the European Research Area (ERA) is on the way but not yet completed. The proposed project provides excellent opportunities to critically reflect the sketched processes and to look into future. The suggested projects quality, credibility and novelty lies in its * attempt to systematically investigate knowledge and cultural exchanges between the BSR and Western Europe from the late 18th century to the present, * theoretical and methodological approaches with the potential to establish new pathways for future research and in its foregrounding of gender aspects. The suggested project establishes a network consisting of 12 research institutions from 12 BSR countries and Austria. It includes representatives of all the core disciplines of the humanities emerging around 1900. Innovative aspects of the proposed project consist of 1) drawing attention to an emerging region (BSR) consisting of countries previously considered as belonging to separate historical regions, 2) systematic investigation of knowledge and culture exchange within and beyond the region, 3) innovative theoretical framework, 4) inter/multidisciplinary methodology and 5) explicit gender perspectives.


Tuncel D.,Bilkent University
Nanoscale | Year: 2011

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are interest to many different disciplines including chemistry, physics, biology, material science and engineering because of their unique properties and potential applications in various areas spanning from optoelectronics to biotechnology. However, one of the drawbacks associated with these materials is their insolubility which limits their wide accessibility for many applications. Various approaches have been adopted to circumvent this problem including modification of carbon nanotube surfaces by non-covalent and covalent attachments of solubilizing groups. Covalent approach modification may alter the intrinsic properties of carbon nanotubes and, in turn make them undesirable for many applications. On the other hand, a non-covalent approach helps to improve the solubility of CNTs while preserving their intrinsic properties. Among many non-covalent modifiers of CNTs, conjugated polymers are receiving increasing attention and highly appealing because of a number of reasons. To this end, the aim of this feature article is to review the recent results on the conjugated polymer-based non-covalent functionalization of CNTs with an emphasis on the effect of conjugated polymers in the dispersibility/solubility, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes as well as their usage in the purification and isolation of a specific single-walled nanotube from the mixture of the various tubes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-STG | Phase: ERC-StG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

Microswimmers, i.e., biological and artificial microscopic objects capable of self-propulsion, have been attracting a growing interest from the biological and physical communities. From the fundamental side, their study can shed light on the far-from-equilibrium physics underlying the adaptive and collective behavior of biological entities such as chemotactic bacteria and eukaryotic cells. From the more applied side, they provide tantalizing options to perform tasks not easily achievable with other available techniques, such as the targeted localization, pick-up and delivery of microscopic and nanoscopic cargoes, e.g., in drug delivery, bioremediation and chemical sensing. However, there are still several open challenges that need to be tackled in order to achieve the full scientific and technological potential of microswimmers in real-life settings. The main challenges are: (1) to identify a biocompatible propulstion mechanism and energy supply capable of lasting for the whole particle life-cycle; (2) to understand their behavior in complex and crowded environments; (3) to learn how to engineer emergent behaviors; and (4) to scale down their dimensions towards the nanoscale. This project aims at tackling these challenges by developing biocompatible microswimmers capable of elaborate behaviors, by engineering their performance when interacting with other particles and with a complex environment, and by developing working nanoswimmers. To achieve these goals, we have laid out a roadmap that will lead us to push the frontiers of the current understanding of active matter both at the mesoscopic and at the nanoscopic scale, and will permit us to develop some technologically disruptive techniques, namely, targeted delivery of cargoes within complex environments, which is of interest for drug delivery and bioremediation, and efficient sorting of chiral nanoparticles, which is of interest for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 145.84K | Year: 2016

It is reported that data centers today consume up to 3 percent of the global electricity usage. This is expected to increase in the upcoming years as the amount of data processed in the cloud increases substantially. An effective way for data centers to achieve better performance and energy efficiency is to perform computation on specialized processing elements. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) enable customization of logic after manufacturing to achieve better energy efficiency compared to general purpose processors. Today, prominent hardware and software companies are investing in data center solutions that integrate FPGAs with CPUs, and significant energy consumption and performance improvements have been demonstrated for several data center applications. However, the main barrier for wide spread adoption of FGPAs in data centers is the cost of programming, which typically requires months of development time by hardware designers. This makes it unaffordable for small-to-medium software companies to effectively utilize the available FPGAs. The purpose of this project is to lower this barrier for emerging graph analytics applications for knowledge discovery and machine learning. The basic idea is to use an abstract interface that allows a domain expert to describe an application as a set of serial functions defined per vertex and/or edge. We propose a customizable implementation template that automatically maps the abstract user functions to massively parallel FPGA implementations. The proposed template will hide from users many low level implementation details such as parallelization, pipelining, synchronization, memory access optimization, race and deadlock avoidance, etc. This will help bridge the gap between high level application descriptions and costly hardware implementations. Our preliminary architecture simulations have shown that the proposed graph processors can achieve significantly better energy efficiency than general purpose processors.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-RI | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 157.84K | Year: 2016

Female empowerment is perceived both as a policy tool for the betterment of overall welfare of the societies, as well as a policy target both in Europe and throughout the world. However, women still lag behind men in education, economic affluence, and political representation in many countries, even in some of the most developed ones. The proposed project aims to shed light on the dynamics behind female empowerment, specifically focusing on the role of urbanization. Modernization and industrialization bring about several advantages for many women such as better education and livelihoods, better say for themselves and their children, and fairer political representation. Yet, urbanization remains insufficient to eradicate the extant problems that women have faced and creates new challenges and obstacles for many. The proposed project argues that female empowerment is a multi-faceted, multi-level phenomenon that calls for such a research strategy and hypothesizes that urbanization has a complex, non-linear effect on female empowerment. To better understand the concept at hand and pinpoint the ways to enhance it, the project incorporates country-, local-, and individual-levels of analysis. The project also combines the strengths of quantitative and qualitative techniques to offer a fuller picture about female empowerment. The main focus of the project is the relationship between urbanization and female empowerment in Turkey, while it also provides a comparative global-level analysis with clear implications for Europe. The proposed research aims to make novel contributions to the feminist studies, urban studies, development studies, and democratization literatures and enhance the competitiveness of European research. In addition to its academic merit, the project also has policy implications aimed at policymakers for future policies and projects, as well as the society at large which could be implemented throughout Europe.


Patent
Samsung and Bilkent University | Date: 2016-01-27

An optical element includes a plurality of nanowires disposed in the form of an array and a light emitting material disposed on the nanowires, where the nanowires are longitudinally aligned in the array to linearly polarize at least a portion of light emitted from the light emitting material, and an electronic device includes the optical element.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: ERC-CG | Phase: ERC-CG-2013-PE2 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2014

Control of matter via light has always fascinated humankind; not surprisingly, laser patterning of materials is as old as the history of the laser. However, this approach has suffered to date from a stubborn lack of long-range order. We have recently discovered a method for regulating self-organised formation of metal-oxide nanostructures at high speed via non-local feedback, thereby achieving unprecedented levels of uniformity over indefinitely large areas by simply scanning the laser beam over the surface. Here, we propose to develop hitherto unimaginable levels of control over matter through laser light. The total optical field at any point is determined by the incident laser field and scattered light from the surrounding surface, in a mathematical form similar to that of a hologram. Thus, it is only logical to control the self-organised pattern through the laser field using, e.g., a spatial light modulator. A simple wavefront tilt should change the periodicity of the nanostructures, but much more exciting possibilities include creation of patterns without translational symmetry, i.e., quasicrystals, or patterns evolving non-trivially under scanning, akin to cellular automata. Our initial results were obtained in ambient atmosphere, where oxygen is the dominant reactant, forming oxides. We further propose to control the chemistry by using a plasma jet to sputter a chosen reactive species onto the surface, which is activated by the laser. While we will focus on the basic mechanisms with atomic nitrogen as test reactant to generate compounds such as TiN and SiN, in principle, this approach paves the way to synthesis of an endless list of materials. By bringing these ideas together, the foundations of revolutionary advances, straddling the boundaries of science fiction, can be laid: laser-controlled self-assembly of plethora of 2D patterns, crystals, and quasicrystals alike, eventually assembled layer by layer into the third dimension -- a 3D material synthesiser.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-RI | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 157.84K | Year: 2016

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is the technology of micromachines up to 100 micrometers in size. In the era of minituarization, MEMS represents a huge and rapidly growing market, which will exceed $20B by 2020 and Europa constitutes about 20% of the total world market. However, the technology struggles with some problems preventing its fast development. This proposal aims to deal with those related to tribocharging (frictional electricity), which has been overlooked so far. Tribocharging is a very common event causing value losses due to electrostatic sticking and electrostatic discharging (ESD) problems in many industrial manufacturing processes such as static cling of powder materials in drug processing, ESD problems in electronics. Attempts to eliminate static electricity from solid and liquid materials includes the addition of antistatic agents to them that increases the deposition of water from ambient moisture and the addition or doping of some conducting materials e.g. carbon powder into plastics and a conductive path removes the excess electrostatic charge. However, these solutions are not generally very practical and limited by the specific applications in micro dimensions. In this proposal, we focused on the elimination of static charge that accumulates on MEMS. To eliminate static electricity from MEMS, I will use the chemical approach that we introduced (Science, 2013). Firstly, we aim to eliminate the excess static charge from polymer based (MEMS) using this approach by incorporating antistatic and anti-sticking properties to these micro devices for the first time. Secondly, ESD will be eliminated in these micro devices using the same approach based on the scavenging of excess electrostatic charges. Finally, it will be possible to extend the lifetime of these micro devices by eliminating problems such as sticking, (charged) particulate contamination due to e.g. wear, and ESD that mainly arise from tribocharging.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2016

The aim of this proposal is to develop adaptive camouflage systems using graphene-enabled smart surfaces. We propose a new class of active surfaces capable of real-time electrical-control of its appearance in a very broad spectrum ranging from visible to microwave covering 6 orders of magnitude in wavelength. The proposed method relies on controlling electromagnetic waves by tuning density of high-mobility charges on single or multilayers of atomically thin graphene electrodes. We will realize this goal by efficient gating of large-area graphene using ionic liquids which yields unprecedented ability to control intensity and phase of the reflected and transmitted electromagnetic waves from the surface. Based on underlying physical mechanisms and applications, the proposed research plan is structured in 3 main directions; (1) Active surfaces in microwave and THz, (2) Active thermal surfaces, and (3) Active surfaces in the visible. The core idea of the proposal is based on a mutually-gated capacitor structure consisting of ionic liquid electrolyte sandwiched between two large area graphene. The voltage applied between the electrodes polarizes the ionic liquid and accumulates high-density of charges. Combining large scale chemical synthesis of graphene, novel device architectures and ionic liquid electrolyte we will develop new tools to understand and control light-matter interaction in a very broad spectrum. Then we will use these tools to fabricate new camouflage and display technologies on flexible polymers and paper substrates which cannot be realized by conventional semiconducting materials. We will challenge specific applications, such as THz compressive imaging, reconfigurable thermal shields, and electronic paper display. At the basic science level, this project revisits and challenges our basic understanding of light-matter interaction, in parallel, the proposed graphene-based smart surfaces will serve as a tool for developing new enabling technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 157.84K | Year: 2016

Genomic data carries a lot of sensitive information about its owner such as his predispositions to sensitive diseases, ancestors, physical attributes, and genomic data of his relatives (leading to interdependent privacy risks). Individuals share vast amount of information on the Web, and some of this information can be used to infer their genomic data. Hence, there is a need to clearly understand the privacy risks on genomic data of individuals considering publicly available information on the Web. It is also crucial to protect genomic privacy of individuals without compromising the utilization of genomic data in research and healthcare. The two main objectives of this project are (i) to develop a new unifying framework for quantification of genomic privacy of individuals and (ii) to establish a complete framework for privacy-preserving utilization, sharing, and verification of genomic data under real-life threat models. Graph-based, iterative algorithms previously developed by the applicant to efficiently analyze big data and make inference from it will be the foundation for the new quantification framework. To achieve the holistic genomic privacy objective, cryptographic tools, techniques from information theory, and statistics (differential privacy) will be used. This project will be a significant step towards understanding the privacy risks on genomic data of individuals and protecting the privacy of genomic data. It will also provide a new vision for security and privacy of health-related data in general and will find many implications in other domains such as banking and online social networks. The results of the project will also have an impact on future policies and legislation about protection of health-related data. This EF will have big impact on the future career of the applicant by helping him build new connections, enhance his expertise, increase his visibility in the field of security and privacy, and improve his independent research skills.

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