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Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Software Defined Networking (SDN) -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis of Top Key Player Forecast To 2022” To Its Research Database According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Software Defined Networking (SDN) Market accounted for $10.88 billion in 2015 and is expected to reach $134.51 billion by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 43.2% from 2015 to 2022. Increasing adoption of SDN in enterprise datacenters across a wide range of industry verticals is one of the key factors favouring the market growth. Furthermore, arrival of big data analytics, complicated network traffic patterns, growing services of cloud computing and need for competent infrastructure are the other factors driving the market growth. North America is the significant market for SDN owing to early adoption of novel technologies such as cloud computing, network virtualization and mobility services. Technological enhancements and high industrialization rate are few of the key factors responsible to the quick growth of the software-defined networking market in this region. However, Asia-Pacific is anticipated to grow at a faster pace during the forecast period. Some of the key players in the market are Extreme Networks, Inc., Hewlett-Packard, Intel Corporation, Juniper Networks, NEC Corporation, Dell Inc., Pica8, Inc., Plexxi, Inc., Big Switch Networks, Inc., Brocade Communications Systems, Inc., VMware, Inc., Huawei, AT&T, Alcatel-Lucent and Google Inc. Services Covered • Support and Maintenance • Network Security and Analytics • Consulting and Integration • Other Professional Services Industries Covered • Telecom and IT • Manufacturing • Government and Defense • Consumer Goods and Retail • BFSI • Academia and Research • Other industries Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK o Spain o Rest of Europe • Asia Pacific o Japan o China o India o Australia o New Zealand o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements 4 Porters Five Force Analysis 4.1 Bargaining power of suppliers 4.2 Bargaining power of buyers 4.3 Threat of substitutes 4.4 Threat of new entrants 4.5 Competitive rivalry For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/758475-software-defined-networking-sdn-global-market-outlook-2016-2022


Company to Highlight Intent-Based Security Use Cases for Big Monitoring Fabric, Including Inline Mode for DMZ Security Service-Chaining and Pervasive Network Visibility SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - Feb 14, 2017) -  RSA CONFERENCE -- Big Switch Networks®, The Next-Generation Data Center Networking Company, will be at RSA Conference February 13th - 16th, to showcase BigSecure Architecture™ for intent-based cyber-defense at terabit scale, Big Monitoring Fabric™ (Big Mon) Inline for dramatically simplifying deployment and management of security tools in the DMZ through on-demand service chains, and Big Mon out-of-band for delivering cost effective, scale-out, pervasive network visibility. To learn more about Big Switch's security-based use cases, visit Big Switch at booth #N4508. Big Switch will conduct presentations hourly on both BigSecure Architecture and Big Monitoring Fabric Inline and out-of-band use cases. "As the threat landscape continues to rapidly change, with cyber attacks increasing in breadth and scale, IT organizations need next-generation security technologies that will support a pervasive security approach, without the high price tag and complexity of legacy or proprietary security solutions," said Prashant Gandhi, Chief Product Officer, Big Switch Networks. "With game changing SDN-based security delivery solutions from Big Switch, organization can now implement intent-based security while ensuring dynamic and scale-out operations. Mundane tasks which took cycles away from security and networking teams become automated, making the implementation of software-defined security (SDSec) the new norm." As the data center has evolved to accommodate cloud native applications, increasing business velocity, pervasive cyber-attacks, and flat IT budgets, organizations are increasingly challenged to operationally and architecturally scale monitoring and security infrastructure. Traditional methods of gaining visibility into the network -- primarily through network packet brokers (NPBs) are difficult to scale, create visibility silos, are operationally complex, and priced at a premium. Big Switch offers organizations next-generation network security solutions for pervasive security and visibility, cloud-native application monitoring and scale-out cyber-defense to mitigate volumetric distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. Big Monitoring Fabric Out-of-Band Big Monitoring Fabric is a next-generation NPB that leverages software-defined networking (SDN) principles, Open Networking switches and a high-performance x86-based DPDK service node to provide feature-rich, scale-out data center monitoring at up to 50% lower cost than traditional NPBs. Big Mon supports 1G, 10G, 40G and 100G for the most demanding and high volume network monitoring and security environments. Customer use cases for Big Monitoring Fabric include: DMZ/Extranet Inline security as well as monitor every rack, monitor every location or monitor mobile/LTE networks. Big Monitoring Fabric Inline Big Mon Inline offers a simple, scale-out method for deploying security tools in the DMZ and creating on-demand service chains. The controller-based SDN design accelerates high-performance attack mitigation and enables organizations to deploy countermeasures in response to cyber threats. Big Mon Inline provides the centralizing fabric needed for organizations to rollout a consistent, organization-wide DMZ security posture, so security teams have a single pane interface to build and manage scale-out security tool chains. Multiple active, inline tools can be deployed logically inline, in defined sequence, and receive only the traffic of interest to each. Other non-security tools, such as web-proxies, can also take advantage of Big Mon Inline for rapid, non-intrusive inline deployment. Big Mon Inline delivers the most intelligent, agile, and flexible DMZ security architecture, with capabilities including: BigSecure -- A Dynamic Cyber-defense Architecture for Terabit Attack Mitigation The volume, cadence and sophistication of cyber-attacks continues to increase rapidly, most recently witnessed in January when multiple UK banks experienced synchronized DDoS attacks that intermittently paralyzed banking services for two days. Last fall the massive, self-spreading Mirai malware, which comprised more than one hundred thousand internet-connected video cameras, to generate over 1 Terabit of DDoS attack to Domain Name Service (DNS) providers blocked dozens of high-profile, high traffic Internet domains for hours. As DDoS attacks become more rampant, it is mandatory for organizations to deploy cyber-defense mechanisms to protect against massively distributed attacks without breaking their security budget. With BigSecure Architecture, web hosting and cloud computing providers can deploy a dynamic, high-performance, scale-out cyber-defense solution, at an economical price point. The solution enables existing security tools to leverage an externalized elastic attack mitigation infrastructure consisting of the underlying network and a pool of x86-based compute resources. Specifically, the BigSecure Architecture includes: Once BigSecure Architecture is instantiated, a security tool detects high-bandwidth attack and interacts with the Big Monitoring Fabric Controller via programmatic APIs to redirect incoming traffic for elastic mitigation. Depending on the type of attack, the Big Mon Controller activates SDN fabric and compute resources for attack mitigation, reconfigures the service chain to redirect traffic to mitigation infrastructure, and load-balances traffic across a cluster of Big Mon service nodes and NFV tool farm for scale-out performance. The combination of SDN fabric, Big Mon service nodes and NFV tool farm performs Layer-7 scans of network traffic and blocks those packets/flows that contain attack signatures. With BigSecure, security teams are able to deploy dynamic cyber-defense architecture that provides elastic, Terabit-scale attack mitigation capability at an affordable price while continuing to leverage best-of-breed security tools. In addition to Terabit-scale mitigation, BigSecure Architecture also exports flow telemetry (NetFlow, sFlow) of network traffic to anomaly-detection/traffic visibility systems, which provide the ability to detect, classify, and traceback a variety of attacks. Additional Resources Overview: Big Monitoring Fabric Data Sheet: Big Monitoring Fabric Gartner Research Report: Scrutinize Next-Generation Technology Before Buying Another Network Management Tool Video: Big Monitoring Fabric explained Video: Big Monitoring Fabric Inline Overview: BigSecure Architecture Blog: BigSecure + A10 TPS: Dynamic, Scale-out DDoS Attack Mitigation Blog: Big Monitoring Fabric 6.0 Release White Paper: Next-generation Data Center Security and Visibility White Paper: Security Tool Chaining in a DMZ with Big Monitoring Fabric Inline White Paper: Big Monitoring Fabric: Next-Gen NPB Features for a Fraction of the Cost About Big Switch Networks Big Switch Networks is the Next-Generation Data Center Networking Company. We disrupt the status quo of networking by designing intelligent, automated and flexible networks for our customers around the world. We do so by leveraging the principles of software-defined networking (SDN), coupled with a choice of industry-standard hardware. Big Switch Networks has two solutions: Big Monitoring Fabric, a Next-Generation Network Packet Broker, which enables pervasive security and monitoring of data center and cloud traffic for inline or out-of-band deployments and Big Cloud Fabric, the industry's first Next-Generation switching fabric that allows for choice of switching hardware for OpenStack, VMware, Container and Big Data use cases. Big Switch Networks is headquartered in Santa Clara, CA, with offices located in Tokyo, Sydney, London and Istanbul. For additional information, email info@bigswitch.com, follow @bigswitch, visit www.bigswitch.com or register for BSN Labs, a free, hands-on demo environment. Big Switch Networks, Big Cloud Fabric, Big Monitoring Fabric, BigSecure, Big Chain, Switch Light OS, and Switch Light VX are trademarks or registered trademarks of Big Switch Networks, Inc. All other trademarks, service marks, registered marks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners.


SANTA CLARA, CA--(Marketwired - Mar 2, 2017) - Big Switch Networks®, The Next-Generation Data Center Networking Company, announced today that CRN®, a brand of The Channel Company, has named Big Switch to its 2017 Data Center 100 list in the Data Center Provider category. This annual list recognizes technology suppliers that excel at powering, supporting and protecting the complex and demanding data centers on which today's businesses rely. CRN editors select companies for the Data Center 100 list on the basis of multiple criteria, including each company's overall impact on the market, its influence on the channel as a whole, and the types of technology and services it makes available to its partners. In addition to recognizing technology suppliers for outstanding products and services, the Data Center 100 serves as a valuable guide for solution providers looking for best-in-class vendors providing data center infrastructure, data center management tools, software-defined data center technology and data center services. Big Switch Networks was named to the 2017 Data Center 100 list for its product Big Cloud Fabric™ (BCF), a next-generation data center switching fabric. BCF delivers zero-touch operations, network automation and deep visibility for software-defined data centers and cloud-native applications, while reducing total cost of ownership. Using hyperscale-inspired networking principles, software-defined networking (SDN), leaf/spine CLOS fabric and open networking hardware, Big Cloud Fabric implements a logical, scale-out switch and leverages intent-based principles to make networking intelligent, agile and flexible. The solution has built-in integration for VMware SDDC, OpenStack clouds and container environments. BCF can be deployed in existing data centers as a new pod and can interact with traditional networks. "The construction and operation of a reliable data center requires wide-ranging expertise and resources across a number of key technologies," said Robert Faletra, CEO of The Channel Company. "Our annual Data Center 100 list identifies the top vendors in these areas, helping solution providers find proven data center experts who can deliver the necessary depth and breadth of materials, services and expert guidance." "Big Switch is thrilled to be recognized by CRN to its 2017 Data Center 100 list for our innovations in data center networking via our switching fabric, Big Cloud Fabric," said Douglas Murray, CEO, Big Switch Networks. "We are committed to providing next-generation Data Center networking solutions for our customers around the world that fully support the shift to the software-defined data center. This recognition is a testament to the incredible work of the Big Switch team." The Data Center 100 list will be featured in the February 2017 issue of CRN and online at www.crn.com/datacenter100. About Big Switch Networks Big Switch Networks is the Next-Generation Data Center Networking Company. We disrupt the status quo of networking by designing intelligent, automated and flexible networks for our customers around the world. We do so by leveraging the principles of software-defined networking (SDN), coupled with a choice of industry-standard hardware. Big Switch Networks has two solutions: Big Monitoring Fabric, a Next-Generation Network Packet Broker, which enables pervasive security and monitoring of data center and cloud traffic for inline or out-of-band deployments and Big Cloud Fabric, the industry's first Next-Generation switching fabric that allows for choice of switching hardware for OpenStack, VMware, Container and Big Data use cases. Big Switch Networks is headquartered in Santa Clara, CA, with offices located in Tokyo, Sydney, London and Istanbul. For additional information, email info@bigswitch.com, follow @bigswitch, visit www.bigswitch.com or register for BSN Labs, a free, hands-on demo environment. Big Switch Networks, Big Cloud Fabric, Big Monitoring Fabric, BigSecure, Big Chain, Switch Light OS, and Switch Light VX are trademarks or registered trademarks of Big Switch Networks, Inc. All other trademarks, service marks, registered marks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners. About the Channel Company The Channel Company enables breakthrough IT channel performance with our dominant media, engaging events, expert consulting and education, and innovative marketing services and platforms. As the channel catalyst, we connect and empower technology suppliers, solution providers and end users. Backed by more than 30 years of unequaled channel experience, we draw from our deep knowledge to envision innovative new solutions for ever-evolving challenges in the technology marketplace. www.thechannelco.com


A packet forwarding network may include switches that forward network traffic between end hosts that are coupled to the forwarding network. An analysis network may be connected to the forwarding network. A controller may control the switches in the forwarding network to implement desired forwarding paths. The controller may configure the switches to form switch port groups. The controller may identify a port group that is connected to the analysis network. The controller may select a subset of the forwarded packets and may control selected switches to copy the subset to the identified port group. The controller may establish network tunnels between the switches and the port group. In this way, the controller may control the switches to perform efficient traffic monitoring regardless of the location on the forwarding network at which the traffic monitoring network is connected and without interfering with normal packet forwarding operations through the forwarding network.


Patent
Big Switch Networks | Date: 2013-12-27

A controller implemented on computing equipment may be used to control switches in a network. End hosts and service devices may be coupled to the switches in the network. The controller may generate a virtual network topology of virtual switches and virtual routers. The controller may control the virtual routers and/or virtual switches to perform service insertion. The controller may perform service insertion by controlling the virtual routers and/or virtual switches to redirect network traffic through one or more selected service devices. The controller may determine which network traffic is to be redirected to which service devices based on a service insertion policy that identifies network traffic and services to be performed on the network traffic.


A network of switches having ports coupled to other switches or end hosts may be controlled by a controller. The controller may identify whether any switch ports have failed. In response to identifying that a port has failed at a first switch, the controller may modify link aggregation group mappings of the other switches to handle failover. The controller may modify the link aggregation group mapping of each other switch to include a first mapping that includes ports coupled to the first switch and a second mapping that does not include any ports coupled to the first switch. The controller may configure forwarding tables at the switches to forward network packets using the first or second mappings based on network topology information maintained by the controller.


A controller implemented on computing equipment may control switches in a network. The controller may provide flow tables that implement network policies to the switches to control packet forwarding through the network. The controller may provide debug table entries to the switches for use in a debug table that is separate from the flow table. The debug table entries may match incoming network packets and increment corresponding counters on the switches. The controller may retrieve count information from the counters for performing debugging operations on the network. For example, the controller may identify conflicts between fields of a selected flow table entry, determine whether elephant packet flows are present between switches, determine whether desired load balancing is being performed, determine whether a network path has changed, determine whether packet loss has occurred, and/or determine whether network packets are taking undesired paths based on the retrieved count information.


A controller implemented on computing equipment may be used to control switches in a network. End hosts may be coupled to the switches. The controller may generate a virtual network topology of virtual switches, virtual routers, and virtual system routers that are distributed over underlying switches in the network. The controller may form virtual switches from respective groups of end hosts, virtual routers from groups of virtual switches that include virtual interfaces that are coupled to virtual switches, and a virtual system router from groups of virtual routers that includes virtual system router interfaces that are coupled to the virtual routers. The controller may control the virtual network topology by generating respective flow table entries based on identified network policies for each of the virtual routers, virtual system routers, and virtual switches. The controller may control the virtual system routers to route packets between the virtual routers.


First and second controllers implemented on computing equipment may be used to control switches in a network. The switches may forward network packets between end hosts. The second controller may identify first and second redundant partitions of switches in the network that are each coupled to all of the end hosts. The first controller may instruct the first partition to install software while the second partition forwards network traffic and may instruct the second partition to install software while the first partition forwards network traffic. The first controller may install the software while the second controller is active and the second controller may install the software while the first controller is active. In this way, the switches and controllers may be provided with an uninterrupted software upgrade and packets may be forwarded between end hosts during the software upgrade without introducing packet loss or other noticeable reductions in network performance.


Patent
Big Switch Networks | Date: 2013-11-20

A controller may control switches such as physical and software switches in a network. The controller may generate virtual switches from groups of end hosts in forming a virtual network topology. The controller may receive one or more network policy rules that govern network traffic through the switches. For a given network policy rule, the controller may perform a test in determining whether the network satisfies the network policy rule. The test may be performed based on a testing rule identifying test parameters and expected test results. The controller may perform tests in determining whether the network satisfies the testing rule and the corresponding network policy rule. The tests may be performed via simulation at the controller or by injecting a tagged test packet into the network.

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