Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld

Bielefeld, Germany

Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld

Bielefeld, Germany

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Brambatti M.,McMaster University | Brambatti M.,Marche Polytechnic University | Connolly S.J.,McMaster University | Gold M.R.,Medical University of South Carolina | And 12 more authors.
Circulation | Year: 2014

Background - Among patients with implantable pacemakers and defibrillators, subclinical atrial fibrillation (SCAF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke; however, there is limited understanding of their temporal relationship. Methods and Results - The Asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Evaluation in Pacemaker Patients and the Atrial Fibrillation Reduction Atrial Pacing Trial (ASSERT) enrolled 2580 pacemaker and defibrillator patients aged ≥65 years with a history of hypertension but without a history of atrial fibrillation. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators precisely logged the time and duration of all episodes of SCAF and recorded electrograms that were adjudicated by experts. We examined the temporal relationship between SCAF >6 minutes in duration and stroke or systemic embolism. Of 51 patients who experienced stroke or systemic embolism during follow-up, 26 (51%) had SCAF. In 18 patients (35%), SCAF was detected before stroke or systemic embolism. However, only 4 patients (8%) had SCAF detected within 30 days before stroke or systemic embolism, and only 1 of these 4 patients was experiencing SCAF at the time of the stroke. In the 14 patients with SCAF detected >30 days before stroke or systemic embolism, the most recent episode occurred at a median interval of 339 days (25th to 75th percentile, 211-619) earlier. Eight patients (16%) had SCAF detected only after their stroke, despite continuous monitoring for a median duration of 228 days (25th to 75th percentile, 202-719) before their event. Conclusions - Although SCAF is associated with an increased risk of stroke and embolism, very few patients had SCAF in the month before their event. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.


PubMed | Brown University, University of Munster, University of North Texas, University of Hamburg and 22 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2016

Childhood maltreatment has diverse, lifelong impact on morbidity and mortality. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is one of the most commonly used scales to assess and quantify these experiences and their impact. Curiously, despite very widespread use of the CTQ, scores on its Minimization-Denial (MD) subscale-originally designed to assess a positive response bias-are rarely reported. Hence, little is known about this measure. If response biases are either common or consequential, current practices of ignoring the MD scale deserve revision. Therewith, we designed a study to investigate 3 aspects of minimization, as defined by the CTQs MD scale: 1) its prevalence; 2) its latent structure; and finally 3) whether minimization moderates the CTQs discriminative validity in terms of distinguishing between psychiatric patients and community volunteers. Archival, item-level CTQ data from 24 multinational samples were combined for a total of 19,652 participants. Analyses indicated: 1) minimization is common; 2) minimization functions as a continuous construct; and 3) high MD scores attenuate the ability of the CTQ to distinguish between psychiatric patients and community volunteers. Overall, results suggest that a minimizing response bias-as detected by the MD subscale-has a small but significant moderating effect on the CTQs discriminative validity. Results also may suggest that some prior analyses of maltreatment rates or the effects of early maltreatment that have used the CTQ may have underestimated its incidence and impact. We caution researchers and clinicians about the widespread practice of using the CTQ without the MD or collecting MD data but failing to assess and control for its effects on outcomes or dependent variables.


Zdarek J.,St. Jude Medical | Israel C.W.,Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld
Herzschrittmachertherapie und Elektrophysiologie | Year: 2016

Modern implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) systems offer a multitude of algorithms to optimize performance in sensing and tachycardia detection even in difficult circumstances (e. g., ventricular tachycardia during supraventricular tachycardia, fine ventricular fibrillation with intermittent undersensing), to reliably discriminate sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia from noise, nonsustained and supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, and to limit shock therapy only to those arrhythmias that definitely need to be treated by a shock. A disadvantage of these multiple algorithms is the complexity of annotated tracings that makes it sometimes difficult to understand why the ICD did what it did. If a tachycardia classification was wrong, it may be thus difficult to find the best way to reprogram the device to avoid another misclassification. This review explains in detail the algorithms used for tachycardia detection, discrimination, and prevention of inappropriate therapy in single- and dual-chamber ICDs manufactured by St. Jude Medical. Knowledge of these features may help to optimize ICD treatment in patients fitted with these devices. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld and St. Jude Medical
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Herzschrittmachertherapie & Elektrophysiologie | Year: 2016

Modern implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD) systems offer amultitude of algorithms to optimize performance in sensing and tachycardia detection even in difficult circumstances (e.g., ventricular tachycardia during supraventricular tachycardia, fine ventricular fibrillation with intermittent undersensing), to reliably discriminate sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia from noise, nonsustained and supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, and to limit shock therapy only to those arrhythmias that definitely need to be treated by ashock. Adisadvantage of these multiple algorithms is the complexity of annotated tracings that makes it sometimes difficult to understand why the ICD did what it did. If atachycardia classification was wrong, it may be thus difficult to find the best way to reprogram the device to avoid another misclassification. This review explains in detail the algorithms used for tachycardia detection, discrimination, and prevention of inappropriate therapy in single- and dual-chamber ICDs manufactured by St. Jude Medical. Knowledge of these features may help to optimize ICD treatment in patients fitted with these devices.


PubMed | Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld, Goethe University Frankfurt and University of Gottingen
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin and subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of 1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of 4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by 1 or 4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating 1 or 4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type.


Al Mohani G.,Centro Cardiologico Monzino | Israel C.,Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld | Casella M.,Centro Cardiologico Monzino | Carbucicchio C.,Centro Cardiologico Monzino
Herzschrittmachertherapie und Elektrophysiologie | Year: 2014

Electrical storm (ES) is one of the most challenging clinical scenarios facing electrophysiologists, and in certain settings emergency ablation should be performed. The majority of ES occurs in patients with structural heart disease, predominantly coronary heart disease and nonischemic heart disease like right ventricular arrhythmogenic dysplasia and previous myocarditis as well as other cardiomyopathies. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are the first-line therapy in patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and structural heart disease. Recurrent VT episodes or ES are major problems in patients who receive an ICD after a spontaneous sustained VT. In addition, in patients with an ICD implanted for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death, 20∈% will experience at least one VT episode within 3-5 years after ICD implantation. Catheter ablation has a high success rate in the acute setting in eliminating clinical VT. However, several factors make enodocardial catheter ablation of VT more difficult especially in advanced ischemic heart disease with heart failure and aneurysm. Frequently in nonischemic cardiomyopathies (NICM) there tends to be an epicardial and intramyocardial substrate where the critical VT zone can occasionally be epicardial or intramural in location. In some patients, an epicardial approach should be warranted first together with an endocardial approach or after failure of enodocardial ablation. Currently, the success rates of endocardial ablation in the acute setting are acceptable, but in the long term they are still not well defined. The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of epicardial ablation as an alternative approach in controlling ES and to confirm the need for highly qualified centers to manage such challenging cases. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.


Rodewald F.,Hannover Medical School | Wilhelm-Gossling C.,Hannover Medical School | Emrich H.M.,Hannover Medical School | Reddemann L.,Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld | Gast U.,Hannover Medical School
Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was to investigate axis-I comorbidity in patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID) and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS). Using the Diagnostic Interview for Psychiatric Disorders, results from patients with DID (n = 44) and DDNOS (n = 22) were compared with those of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n = 13), other anxiety disorders (n = 14), depression (n = 17), and nonclinical controls (n = 30). No comorbid disorders were found in nonclinical controls. The average number of comorbid disorders in patients with depression or anxiety was 0 to 2. Patients with dissociative disorders averagely suffered from 5 comorbid disorders. The most prevalent comorbidity in DDNOS and DID was PTSD. Comorbidity profiles of patients with DID and DDNOS were very similar to those in PTSD (high prevalence of anxiety, somatoform disorders, and depression), but differed significantly from those of patients with depression and anxiety disorders. These findings confirm the hypothesis that PTSD, DID, and DDNOS are phenomenologically related syndromes that should be summarized within a new diagnostic category. © 2011, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Israel C.W.,Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld
Indian Heart Journal | Year: 2014

Worldwide, sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major problem. It is most frequently caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmias: Monomorphic and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), torsade de pointes (TdP), and ventricular fibrillation (VF). Beta blockade, ACE inhibition, coronary reperfusion and other treatments have reduced the incidence of VT but pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is increasingly seen, particularly in patients with advanced chronic heart disease. From existing data, bradyarrhythmia in the form of asystole (usually complete heart block without escape rhythm) causes only a minor proportion (10-15%) of SCD. In patients aged 50 years and more, coronary artery disease plays a dominant role causing more than 75% of SCD cases, either by acute ischemia and ventricular fibrillation or by chronic scar formation and reentrant VT. In younger patients, SCD may occur in patients with structurally normal hearts. A number of arrhythmogenic disorders with an increased risk of SCD have been detected and better understood recently, such as long and short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and the early repolarization syndrome. Most importantly, ECG signs and clinical features indicating high risk for SCD have been identified. Knowledge of the exact electrophysiologic mechanisms of ventricular tachyarrhythmias at the cellular level has been improved and mechanisms such as phase 2 reentry and reflection proposed to better understand why and how SCD occurs. © 2014, Cardiological Society of India. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld
Type: | Journal: Indian heart journal | Year: 2014

Worldwide, sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major problem. It is most frequently caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmias: Monomorphic and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), torsade de pointes (TdP), and ventricular fibrillation (VF). Beta blockade, ACE inhibition, coronary reperfusion and other treatments have reduced the incidence of VT butpulseless electrical activity (PEA) is increasingly seen, particularly in patients with advanced chronic heart disease. From existing data, bradyarrhythmia in the form of asystole(usually complete heart block without escape rhythm) causes only a minor proportion (10-15%) of SCD. In patients aged 50 years and more, coronary artery disease plays a dominant role causing more than 75% of SCD cases, either by acute ischemia and ventricular fibrillation or by chronic scar formation and reentrant VT. In younger patients, SCD may occur in patients with structurally normal hearts. A number of arrhythmogenic disorders with an increased risk of SCD have been detected and better understood recently, such as long and short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and the early repolarization syndrome. Most importantly, ECG signs and clinical features indicating high risk for SCD have been identified. Knowledge of the exact electrophysiologic mechanisms of ventricular tachyarrhythmias at the cellular level has been improved and mechanisms such as phase 2 reentry and reflection proposed to better understand why and how SCD occurs.


PubMed | Evangelical Hospital Bielefeld and University of Munster
Type: | Journal: Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society | Year: 2016

Currently, evaluation of the stability of spinal instrumentations often focuses on simple pull-out or cyclic loading. However, the loading characteristics and the specimen alignment rarely simulate physiological loading conditions, or the clinical situation itself. The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative setup and parameters to compare static and dynamic characteristics of pedicle screws at the bone-implant interface in lumbar osteoporotic cadavers. A corpectomy model development was based on ASTM-1717 standard, allowing a deflection of the cranial and caudal element under loading. Twelve human osteoporotic vertebrae (L1-L4) were analyzed for morphological CT-data and T-Score. For group A (n=6) loads were simulated as in vivo measurements during walking, representing two months postoperatively. A subsequent pull-out was performed. Group B (n=6) was tested with pure pull-out. Screw loosening at the tip/head was optically measured and analyzed with respect to clinical patterns. Correlations between CT-data, T-Score and in vitro parameters were determined. For group A, the subsidence for the head/tip was measured towards the upper/lower endplate, resulting in visible deflections. The progress of the subsidence was greatest within the first and last cycles until failure. The predominant patterns were pure rotation and toggling. However, the pull-out between groups was not significantly different. Pedicle-angle and cyclic-subsidence correlated with R=0.806/0.794. T-Score and pull-out correlated only in group A. With the corpectomy setup, clinically observed wipe effects and a loss of correction could be simulated. The presented parameters facilitate analysis of the complex changing load distributions and interactions between the left and right bone-implant interface. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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