Bial Aristegui

Bilbao, Spain

Bial Aristegui

Bilbao, Spain
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Gandolfo-Cano M.,Hospital Universitario Fuenlabrada | Bartra J.,University of Barcelona | Bartra J.,Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer IDIBAPS | Gonzalez-Mancebo E.,Hospital Universitario Fuenlabrada | And 9 more authors.
British Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2014

Background The relevance of contact allergy to plant-related food has recently emerged. Oral allergy syndrome is one of the most characteristic symptoms of fruit allergy, although it also causes systemic reactions. Plant-food allergy is increasing at the same time as pollen allergy, and fruit-induced allergic contact urticaria could be rising as well. Objectives The present study was carried out in order to investigate whether one particular primary melon-peel allergen is responsible for contact urticaria. Methods Fourteen patients presenting with contact urticaria after touching melon peel were evaluated. A melon-peel extract was prepared and analysed by immunoblotting using the patients' sera. Molecular characterization of IgE-binding bands was performed using mass spectrometry. Melon-peel lipid transfer protein (LTP) was purified. Inhibition studies and contact challenge with the protein were performed to confirm IgE reactivity to the purified allergen. Results An IgE-binding band of ~8-9 kDa was observed in an immunoblotting assay with all the patients' sera and was identified as an LTP. The melon-peel LTP was purified in two chromatography steps. Inhibition studies confirmed LTP as a major allergen in patients with melon-peel contact urticaria. Contact challenge with melon-peel LTP was performed in five patients, all of whom had positive results, exhibiting itchy erythema and hives in the area of contact. Conclusions This study confirmed our previous findings that melon-peel LTP is a major allergen and is responsible for contact allergy. This knowledge may be used to improve both diagnosis and treatment of patients allergic to melon. What's already known about this topic? The relevance of contact allergy to plant-related food has recently emerged, and the number of patients reporting contact allergy to melon peel has increased strikingly; however, the allergens involved have not been studied. Allergic reactions attributed to melon-pulp ingestion can be caused by contact with the peel of this fruit while eating it. What does this study add? This study demonstrates that melon-peel lipid transfer protein is responsible for contact urticaria in patients sensitized to melon. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.


Ibrahim A.R.N.,Hiroshima University | Kawamoto S.,Hiroshima University | Nishimura M.,Hiroshima University | Pak S.,Hiroshima University | And 6 more authors.
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2010

Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen is a major cause of seasonal rhinitis and conjunctivitis in Japan, and an understanding of its full allergen repertoire is prerequisite for the development of future molecular diagnostics and immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we report the identification of a new C. japonica pollen IgE-binding antigen (CJP-8) homologous to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), a class of plant cross-reactive allergens found in foods, latex, and pollen grains. The cjp-8 cDNA encodes a 165-amino acid polypeptide possessing the conserved eight cysteines characteristic of plant LTP family members. Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant CJP-8 (r-CJP-8) reacted with IgE antibody from Japanese cedar pollinosis patients at a 37.5% frequency (6/16).


Morin M.,University of Salamanca | Asturias J.A.,Bial Aristegui | Dominguez A.,University of Salamanca
FEMS Microbiology Letters | Year: 2012

Allergies affect almost 25% of the population in industrialized countries. Alternaria alternata is known to be a significant source of aeroallergens and sensitization to this mold is a risk factor for the development of wheezing, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Diagnosis and treatment of allergies requires the production of large amounts of pure and well defined protein. Yarrowia lipolytica, a non-pathogenic ascomycete able to secrete high levels of enzymes that can grow in inexpensive substrates, has been considered a useful host for heterologous gene expression. In the present work, we have developed two vectors for expressing Alt a 1, the most relevant A. alternata allergen, in Y. lipolytica. One vector is autosomal and one is integrative. With both systems, rAlt a 1 was secreted into the culture medium. The immunological characteristics of the purified recombinant allergen were determined by IgE-blot using sera from 42 A. alternata-allergic patients. We have carried out ELISA-inhibition experiments using sera from four patients to compare the IgE-binding capacity of natural and recombinant allergens. Our results show that Y. lipolytica is able to produce a recombinant Alt a 1 which is immunochemically equivalent to the natural counterpart and could be used for immunotherapy and diagnostics.© 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.


Martin-Munoz M.F.,Pediatric Hospital La Paz | Bartolome B.,Bial Aristegui | Caminoa M.,Pediatric Hospital La Paz | Bobolea I.,Pediatric Hospital La Paz | And 2 more authors.
Allergologia et Immunopathologia | Year: 2010

Background: Bee pollen has been proposed as a food supplement, but it can be a dangerous food for people with allergy. We study an allergic reaction after ingestion of bee pollen in a 4-year-old boy who had developed rhinitis in the last spring and autumn. Methods: We performed a prick-by-prick test with bee pollen and skin prick tests with the most important local pollens, house dust mites, common fungi, and animal danders. The levels of serum tryptase, serum total IgE and specific IgE against bee venom and local pollen extracts were determined. The composition of the bee pollen was analysed and SDS-PAGE immunoblotting and blotting-inhibition were carried out. Results: Prick tests were positive to bee pollen and all local pollens extracts and negative to any other allergen sources. The bee pollen sample contained pollens from Quercus genus, and Asteraceae (Compositae) and Rosaceae families. Total IgE was 435. kU/l. Serum specific IgE to bee pollen was 6. kU/l and greater than 0.35. kU/L against pollens from Artemisia vulgaris, Taraxacum officinalis, Cupressus arizonica, Olea europaea, Platanus acerifolia and Lolium perenne as well as to n Art v 1 and other pollen marker allergens. Tryptase level was 3.5. mcg/mL. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting-inhibition points to Asteraceae pollen as the possible cause of the allergic reaction. Conclusion: Foods derived from bees can be dangerous to people with allergy to pollen. © 2009 SEICAP.


Rodriguez-Rajo F.J.,University of Vigo | Jato V.,University of Vigo | Gonzalez-Parrado Z.,University of León | Elvira-Rendueles B.,Technical University of Cartagena | And 5 more authors.
Aerobiologia | Year: 2011

Exposure to allergens represents a key factor among the environmental determinants of asthma. The most common information available for pollinosis patients is the concentration of pollen grains in the bioaerosol and their temporal distribution. However, in recent years, discordance between pollen concentrations and allergic symptoms has been detected. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the relationship between pollen counts and the atmospheric aeroallergen concentrations in different Spanish bioclimatic areas. For the monitoring of allergen content in the air, a quantitative antigen-antibody technique combined with the Cyclone sampling methodology was used. The study was conducted during 2007 by considering some of the most common allergens that induce pollinosis in each area: Platanus and Urticaceae in Ourense and Cartagena, and Poaceae in Ourense and León. In Ourense, pollen counts and aeroallergen concentrations coincided for the three pollen types studied, and the pollen and allergen data associated with the meteorological factors were highly significant for the pollen counts. In Cartagena (for Platanus and Urticaceae) and León (for Poaceae), the low correlations between pollen counts and allergen concentrations obtained could be due to the specific bioclimatic conditions. In contrast, the higher allergen concentrations found in the atmosphere in Cartagena and León compared to Ourense could be related to the existing pollutant levels there, inducing a higher expression of plant pathogenesis-related proteins in the plants of polluted cities. The combination of pollen counts and allergen quantification must be assessed to reliably estimate exposure of allergic people to allergens in different bioclimatic areas. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Jato V.,University of Vigo | Rodriguez-Rajo F.J.,University of Vigo | Gonzalez-Parrado Z.,University of Len | Elvira-Rendueles B.,Technical University of Cartagena | And 5 more authors.
Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology | Year: 2010

Background: In aerobiological studies, the Parietaria pollen type usually includes all Parietaria and Urtica species found in the area. Given that Urtica is a nonallergenic plant, the pollen counts report incomplete information on the presence of allergens in the atmosphere. Discordance between the pollen concentrations of Urticaceae and allergic symptoms has been observed in patients with pollinosis. Objective: To compare the Urticaceae pollen counts with the Par j 1 and Par j 2 aeroallergen concentrations from 2 different Spanish geographic areas to determine the allergenic load in the atmosphere. Methods: Hirst-type volumetric traps and Burkard Cyclone samplers were used for pollen counts and aeroallergen capture, respectively. The quantification of Par j 1 and Par j 2 allergens was performed using specific 2-site antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemical techniques were applied to localize these allergens in the orbicules. Results: Differences between areas and years were obtained in both pollen and aeroallergen concentrations. Despite the lower pollen counts recorded in Cartagena, higher aeroallergen concentrations were registered compared with Ourense. A lower correlation was achieved between Urticaceae pollen concentrations and aeroallergen levels, with a maximum positive significant correlation (adjusted R2 = 0.466, P <.001). Intense labeling of Par j 1 and Par j 2 proteins was observed in the orbicules, the tapetal membrane, and the tapetal tissue remnants. Conclusion: This method may be valuable for epidemiologic research to establish correlations between concentrations of Parietaria aeroallergens and clinical symptoms. Therefore, the measurement of aeroallergens should be incorporated into the aerobiological studies with clinical applications. © 2010 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Sanchez-Lopez J.,University of Barcelona | Sanchez-Lopez J.,Center for Biomedical Investigation in Respiratory Diseases | Asturias J.A.,Bial Aristegui | Enrique E.,Hospital General Of Castellon | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2011

Background: Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) are responsible for systemic manifestations in food allergy. Their relationship with pollinosis is not clear. In our area, many patients allergic to multiple LTP-containing foods present pollinosis due to Cupressus arizonica. Methods: We selected 6 patients with cypress pollinosis and food allergy to peach. Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed for pollens (grass, cypress, wall pellitory, plane tree, and olive tree) and plant foods (hazelnut, kiwifruit, peach peel, maize, wheat, peanut, lettuce, apple, mustard, and melon). In vitro assays included specifi c immunoglobulin (Ig) E to C arizonica and peach LTP (Pru p 3), enzyme allergosorbent test (EAST) inhibition, immunoblotting, immunoblotting-inhibition, and immunocytochemical techniques for the detection of Pru p 3-like LTP in cypress pollen grains. Results: SPT were positive for C arizonica, peach, lettuce, mustard, and hazelnut in all patients. Specifi c IgE to C arizonica and Pru p 3 was positive in all but 1 patient, whose Pru p 3 IgE was negative. Immunoblotting under nonreducing conditions with C arizonica extract and patients' sera showed a band at 14-15 kDa that was inhibited by Pru p 3. Pru p 3 partially inhibited the C arizonica pollen extract in EASTinhibition. Pru p 3-like LTP was localized in the cytoplasm and walls of C arizonica pollen grains. Conclusion: A 15-kDa allergen in C arizonica pollen was found in a group of patients presenting peach allergy and respiratory symptoms to cypress. In vitro tests and immunocytochemical techniques indicate that this protein is an LTP. © 2011 Esmon Publicidad.


Rodriguez-Rajo F.J.,University of Vigo | Vega-Maray A.M.,University of León | Asturias J.A.,Bial Aristegui | Jato V.,University of Vigo | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Plant Sciences | Year: 2010

This study contributes to the knowledge of the traffic of substances between tapetum cells and microspores through the localization of pollen proteins during microsporogenesis, by using immunocytochemical techniques with TEM. Because the Oleaceae genera, including Olea and Fraxinus, share a very similar protein profile, an Ole e 1-like protein (which cross-reacts with the Olea europaea major allergen Ole e 1) was detected in Fraxinus angustifolia pollen grains. From the tetrad to mature-pollen grain stages, distinct labeling intensities were localized in the tapetal cells, anther locule, and orbicules as well as in the microspore and pollen cytoplasms and walls. The localization of this protein in the glycocalyx proves the special role of this layer in ectexine development. At exine deposition stages, the detection of immunogold particles in the anther locule and orbicules can be interpreted as showing an active transfer of these proteins from the tapetum cells to microspores. Moreover, at the bicellular stage, the diffusion of proteins from the pollen cytoplasm to the intine channels indicates their contribution to intine formation. These findings provide new evidence of the role of sporophytic and gametophytic tissues in pollen grain development. Moreover, the Ole e 1-like protein may have an important role in modifying pollen grain walls. © 2010 by The University of Chicago.


Arilla M.C.,Bial Aristegui | Ibarrola I.,Bial Aristegui | Brena S.,Bial Aristegui | Martinez A.,Bial Aristegui | And 2 more authors.
International Archives of Allergy and Immunology | Year: 2010

Background: Russian thistle (Salsola kali) pollen is an important cause of pollinosis in areas where rainfall is not abundant. Our aim was to develop an ELISA for quantification of the major allergen of S. kali extracts, Sal k 1, and to assess the correlation of this allergen content with the allergenic activity of extracts. Methods: Sal k 1 was purified by ion exchange and gel permeation chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 was used for capture at 5 μg/ml and biotin-labeled specific antiserum at 0.25 μg/ml served for detection. The allergenic activity of the pollen extracts was measured by enzyme allergosorbent test inhibition. Results: Sal k 1 reacted to 85% of sera from 40 S. kali-allergic patients and was able to inhibit 92% of the IgE-binding capacity of patients' serum pool to the whole extract. The ELISA had a lineal range between 1.25 and 20 ng/ml of purified Sal k 1. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were lower than 5 and 10%, respectively. The assay was very sensitive since it had a detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml. No reactivity was found outside the Amaranthaceae family where only Kochia and Salicornia sp. gave significant reactivity. A good correlation (Spearman's ρ = 0.92) was obtained between Sal k 1 content of different S. kali extracts and their IgE-binding activity. Conclusions: The results proved the usefulness of the two-site sandwich ELISA for aeroallergen control and for the standardization of S. kali pollen extracts intended for clinical use. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG.


PubMed | Bial Aristegui
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International archives of allergy and immunology | Year: 2010

Russian thistle (Salsola kali) pollen is an important cause of pollinosis in areas where rainfall is not abundant. Our aim was to develop an ELISA for quantification of the major allergen of S. kali extracts, Sal k 1, and to assess the correlation of this allergen content with the allergenic activity of extracts.Sal k 1 was purified by ion exchange and gel permeation chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 was used for capture at 5 microg/ml and biotin-labeled specific antiserum at 0.25 microg/ml served for detection. The allergenic activity of the pollen extracts was measured by enzyme allergosorbent test inhibition.Sal k 1 reacted to 85% of sera from 40 S. kali-allergic patients and was able to inhibit 92% of the IgE-binding capacity of patients serum pool to the whole extract. The ELISA had a lineal range between 1.25 and 20 ng/ml of purified Sal k 1. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were lower than 5 and 10%, respectively. The assay was very sensitive since it had a detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml. No reactivity was found outside the Amaranthaceae family where only Kochia and Salicornia sp. gave significant reactivity. A good correlation (Spearmans rho = 0.92) was obtained between Sal k 1 content of different S. kali extracts and their IgE-binding activity.The results proved the usefulness of the two-site sandwich ELISA for aeroallergen control and for the standardization of S. kali pollen extracts intended for clinical use.

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