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Shenzhen, China

Li Z.,Central South University | Li Z.,Wenzhou University | Tang J.,Central South University | Li H.,Central South University | And 9 more authors.
Scientific Reports | Year: 2014

Telomeres are protective chromosomal structures that play a key role in preserving genomic stability. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the abnormal telomere length in leukocytes is associated with some mental disorders and age-related diseases. However, the association between leukocyte telomere length and autism has not been investigated. Here we investigated the possible association between relative telomere length (RTL) in peripheral blood leukocytes and childhood autism by using an established real-time polymerase chain reaction method. We observed significantly shorter RTL in patients with childhood autism than in controls (p=0.006). Individuals with shorter RTL had a significantly increased presence of childhood autism compared with those who had long RTL. In patients, we found that family training interventions have a significant effect on telomere length (P=0.012), but no correlations between RTL and clinical features (paternal age, maternal age, age of onset, illness of duration, CARS score and ABC score) were observed in this study. These results provided the first evidence that shorter leukocytes telomere length is significantly associated with childhood autism. The molecular mechanism underlying telomere length may be implicated in the development of autism. Source


Chen S.,Wenzhou University | Li Z.,Wenzhou University | He Y.,Central South University | Zhang F.,Chinese Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences | And 9 more authors.
BMC psychiatry | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: Several lines of evidence indicate mitochondrial impairment in the pathophysiology of autism. As one of the most common biomarkers for mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number has also been linked to autism, but the relationship between mtDNA copy number and autism was still obscured. In this study, we performed a case-control study to investigate whether mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood cells is related to patients with autism.METHODS: Relative mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood cells was measured by using real-time polymerase chain reaction method. The participants in this study included 78 patients with childhood autism and 83 typically developing children.RESULTS: We observed children with autism had significantly elevated relative mtDNA copy number than healthy controls (Beta = -0.173, P = 0.0003). However, there were no significant correlations between mtDNA copy number and clinical features (paternal age, maternal age, age of onset, illness of duration, CARS score and ABC score) in childhood autism.CONCLUSION: We show that elevated mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood is associated with autism, indicating that there may be mitochondrial dysfunction in children with autism. Source


Chen S.,Wenzhou University | Li Z.,Wenzhou University | He Y.,Central South University | Zhang F.,Central South University | And 15 more authors.
BMC Psychiatry | Year: 2015

Background: Several lines of evidence indicate mitochondrial impairment in the pathophysiology of autism. As one of the most common biomarkers for mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number has also been linked to autism, but the relationship between mtDNA copy number and autism was still obscured. In this study, we performed a case-control study to investigate whether mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood cells is related to patients with autism. Methods: Relative mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood cells was measured by using real-time polymerase chain reaction method. The participants in this study included 78 patients with childhood autism and 83 typically developing children. Results: We observed children with autism had significantly elevated relative mtDNA copy number than healthy controls (Beta = -0.173, P = 0.0003). However, there were no significant correlations between mtDNA copy number and clinical features (paternal age, maternal age, age of onset, illness of duration, CARS score and ABC score) in childhood autism. Conclusion: We show that elevated mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood is associated with autism, indicating that there may be mitochondrial dysfunction in children with autism. © 2015 Chen et al. Source


Zhang P.,CAS Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology | Zhang P.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Zhang Y.,CAS Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology | Zhang Y.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | And 11 more authors.
Cellular Reprogramming | Year: 2012

Production of transgenic animals via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been adapted worldwide, but this application is somewhat limited by its relatively low efficiency. In this study, we used handmade cloning (HMC) established previously to produce transgenic pigs that express the functional nematode fat-1 gene. Codon-optimized mfat-1 was inserted into eukaryotic expression vectors, which were transferred into primary swine donor cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), gas chromatography, and chromosome analyses were performed to select donor clones capable of converting n-6 into n-3 fatty acids. Blastocysts derived from the clones that lowered the n-6/n-3 ratio to approximately 1:1 were transferred surgically into the uteri of recipients for transgenic piglets. By HMC, 37% (n=558) of reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage after 7 days of culture in vitro, with an average cell number of 81±36 (n=14). Three recipients became pregnant after 408 day-6 blastocysts were transferred into four naturally cycling females, and a total of 14 live offspring were produced. The nematode mfat-1 effectively lowered the n-6/n-3 ratio in muscle and major organs of the transgenic pig. Our results will help to establish a reliable procedure and an efficient option in the production of transgenic animals. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Source


Li F.,BGI Shenzhen | Li Y.,BGI Shenzhen | Liu H.,BGI Shenzhen | Zhang H.,BGI Shenzhen | And 5 more authors.
Yi chuan = Hereditas / Zhongguo yi chuan xue hui bian ji | Year: 2014

DNA editing techniques for targeted genome modification have witnessed remarkable advances and been widely used in various organisms. However, traditional gene targeting and cloning method has been shown to be low efficient, time-consuming and expensive for generating knockout animals, especially for big animals. Here we report the generation of site-specific genome modified pig with the newly developed artificially engineered sequence-specific endonucleases (transcription activator-like effector nuclease, TALENs) and handmade cloning (HMC) methods. First, we constructed the porcine GHR-knockout vector according to TALENs kit protocol. To obtain the nuclear donor, the fetal fibroblast cell of Bama (BM) pig were transfected with GHR-knockout vector in G418 selection medium. We collected 173 cell for further positive identification which showed that 46.2% (78/173) of the clones were GHR-knockout cell strains. We chose one bi-allelic knockout cell strain as nuclear donor to produce reconstructed embryos by HMC. It was shown that the blastocyst rate was 43.5% at the 6(th) day in vitro, then 654 HMC-blastocysts were transplanted to uterus of six recipient sows. Finally, a total of 10 live offspring were delivered including 7 bi-allelic knockout piglets. Fibroblasts were obtained from ear biopsies for GHR knockout detection. The body weight of the piglets was measured consecutively, and it was found that the GHR(-)(/)(-) pigs were only 50% smaller than that of the controls at the 20(th) week. In conclusion, our results indicate that TALENs and HMC technology can rapidly and efficiently produce knockout animals for agricultural and biomedical research. Source

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