Reading, United Kingdom
Reading, United Kingdom

BG Group plc is a British multinational oil and gas company headquartered in Reading, United Kingdom. It has operations in 25 countries across Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America and South America and produces around 680,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day. It has a major Liquefied Natural Gas business and is the largest supplier of LNG to the United States. As at 31 December 2009 it had total proven commercial reserves of 2.6 billion barrels of oil equivalent.BG Group is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index. As of 6 July 2012 it had a market capitalisation of £44.9 billion, the seventh-largest company listed on the London Stock Exchange. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

A global group of 30 leading institutional investors coordinated by the PRI (Principles for Responsible Investment) has announced a new initiative that will encourage oil and gas companies, including gas utilities, around the world to initiate or improve efforts to measure, report, and reduce methane emissions. The move is the latest evidence that investors are concerned with the financial, reputational and environmental risks associated with unmonitored and unchecked methane venting and leakage. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with over 80 times the warming power of carbon dioxide over a 20-year timeframe. It’s responsible for about 25% of the warming our planet is experiencing today. Globally, the oil and gas industry is among the largest man-made sources of methane. Methane is also the main ingredient in the natural gas, the product that major global producers have marketed to investors as central to their growth in the years ahead. Companies tout gas as a clean, low-carbon fuel, ignoring the vast amounts of unburned methane escaping from their systems each year, or the lack of transparency with regard to monitoring and reduction strategies. The owners and asset managers involved in the PRI’s methane initiative oversee more than $3 trillion. They are global in scope, representing a dozen countries across North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. PRI plans to engage 29 companies on four continents, from across the natural gas supply chain (the names aren’t being made public). They will be urging greater transparency and stronger, more concrete actions, including setting methane targets and participating responsibly on methane policy. A centerpiece of PRI’s ongoing efforts to improve companies’ methane management and disclosure will be the Investor’s Guide to Methane, published jointly with EDF last fall. PRI’s global methane initiative complements ongoing U.S. engagement efforts on methane led by the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility and CERES. This is an uncertain time for the methane issue globally. On the one hand, President Trump and many U.S. lawmakers are trying to roll back methane policies established during the Obama administration. On the other, officials in Canada are expected to release draft oil and gas methane regulations this year, and similar rules are being developed in Mexico. Political backpedaling from methane controls is shortsighted and counterproductive for both industry and environment, ignoring one of the biggest and most cost-effective opportunities we have to slow the warming of our globe. But these major investors, whose long-term investment horizons require them to look beyond the short-term calculus that dominates both politics and executive compensation packages, are taking a view to match their financial stake in the industry’s future. What they see is a growing liability for an industry looking to the production and delivery of natural gas a growth engine over the coming decades. The problem isn’t going to go away, no matter what they’re saying in Washington. Producers like BP, Shell and Chevron routinely cite rising global demand for natural gas as a primary driver of growth and valuation. But in markets for new electric generating capacity, natural gas is increasingly competing on a cost basis with clean, renewable sources like wind and solar. Failure to deliver on its frequent promises to deliver a more climate-friendly energy choice puts the gas industry and its investors at risk. That makes methane the key variable. Conservative estimates are that, worldwide, companies are releasing at least 3.5 trillion cubic feet of methane to the atmosphere each year. That’s about the same amount as all the gas sold by Norway – the world’s seventh largest producer. Besides being a huge climate problem, it’s also a huge waste of a valuable product, and perhaps an indicator that attention to the integrity of operations is not as great as what companies claim. Concern about methane isn’t limited to oil and gas investors. There’s growing awareness within the industry itself that methane poses a reputational risk, sparking some companies to start addressing the challenge. For example, 10 of the world’s largest oil and gas companies – BG Group, BP, Eni, Pemex, Reliance Industries, Repsol, Saudi Aramco, Shell, Statoil and Total – recently launched the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), a billion-dollar investment to accelerate commercial deployment of low carbon energy technologies. Their primary focus will be carbon capture and storage and reducing oil and gas methane emissions. Similarly, the Oil and Gas Methane Partnership (OGMP), a voluntary effort to improve emissions reporting and accelerate best methane reduction practices recently issued its first annual report, detailing emissions found in nine key source categories throughout individual operator’s systems. Launched in 2014, participating companies include BP, Eni, Pemex, PTT, Repsol, Southwestern Energy, Statoil, and Total. These are crucial first steps for the industry, and is a sign that companies looking for ways to adapt to the changing climate surrounding its business. But the industry still has a very long way to go. Fixing the problem could yield huge benefits: A 45% reduction in global oil and gas methane emissions would have roughly the same climate impact over 20 years as closing one-third of the world’s coal fired power plants. Investor calls for action on methane are quickening and now industry needs to show shareholders it will take the necessary steps to deliver on the low-carbon fuel promise of natural gas. Investors want to invest in well-run companies with good governance, and increasingly look to methane as a proxy for efficient operations. As company executives think about how to attract capital, they will be well-served to note this emerging dynamic and proactively get ahead of the issue.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

As a world leader in advanced inspection solutions, Eddyfi Technologies is thrilled to announce the acquisition of TSC Inspection Systems. Headquartered in Milton Keynes, UK, TSC has significantly contributed in shaping the landscape of electromagnetic testing technologies over the last 30 years. The company developed the field-proven ACFM® technology with support from BP, BG Group, Conoco, and Shell, who were keen to significantly improve the reliability of underwater inspections, reduce operator dependence, and provide auditable inspection records. Decades later, the ACFM technology is specified by owners and operators of safety-critical infrastructures worldwide and is accepted as one of the most reliable methods of detecting surface-breaking cracks in steel structures and metallic components. The company’s StressProbe™ technology also provides highly versatile, non-contacting strain measurement systems that can operate through coatings in harsh environments, both onshore and subsea. TSC currently has 35 employees and satellite offices in Aberdeen and Singapore. After its successful acquisition of Silverwing in 2016, this additional strategic transaction reinforces Eddyfi Technologies’ presence in the UK and broadens the company’s portfolio of technologies and addressable markets. Martin Thériault, president and CEO of Eddyfi Technologies says: “We will be investing significantly to advance TSC technologies and products, while preserving the widely recognized history of ACFM and StressProbe. We will move the company closer to a technology provider role in better collaboration with the various players of the industry. Our wide network of sales and applications engineers will allow us to support ACFM users worldwide and offer the best to all those relying on the technology to perform surface inspections, topside and underwater. Finally, we are especially excited about entering the subsea market and expand our range of solutions for the world’s most challenging offshore oil and gas applications.” Chris Walters, CEO of TSC adds: “We are extremely pleased to see TSC joining an expanding and progressive NDT technology group that really understands the dynamics of the industry today, with a team and vision for growth that offer incredible synergies to the TSC brand, technologies, and products. We believe that Eddyfi Technologies’ scale, expertise, and reputation in advanced NDT technology will be key to advancing the capabilities and applications for ACFM and StressProbe in new exciting markets. It is fantastic to join forces as a unique, world-class NDT technology provider and we appreciate very much the support of our institutional backers Octopus Investments and Encore Capital, and our advisers Simmons & Company International that helped make it happen.” With this acquisition, Eddyfi Technologies further accelerates its scaling and growth with more than 235 employees and sales in 70 countries. Last March, Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ), one of North America’s leading institutional fund managers, invested in Eddyfi Technologies to help it pursue its international growth plan. As a minority shareholder of the company, CDPQ’s investment has helped finance this new acquisition. Eddyfi Technologies maximizes the potential of multiple advanced and niche NDT inspection technology brands. With its three centers of excellence in Québec (Canada), Swansea (UK), and Milton Keynes (UK), Eddyfi Technologies focuses on offering high-performance NDT solutions for the inspection of critical components and assets through three strong, complementary brands: Eddyfi, Silverwing, and TSC. Eddyfi Technologies serves customers in more than 70 countries in such major industries as nuclear, power generation, oil & gas, and aerospace, leveraging several offices around the globe, all staffed by NDT experts.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

Ben van Beurden, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, took time to speak to The Washington Post on May 17 during a visit to Washington, and he touched on the oil giant’s transformation, climate change, millennials, the new Trump administration, economic sanctions and the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. It’s been a turbulent couple of years for the Shell CEO. With the roller coaster in crude oil prices, the company’s stock has lurched from a high of $83.12 a share six months after he took charge to a low of $36.87. The stock has climbed back, but revenue has plunged by a third since 2013. The shareholders’ annual meeting is on May 23 at The Hague. Along the way, van Beurden has been reorienting Shell, placing more emphasis on natural gas and less on oil, based on the theory that as climate concerns grow companies will favor gas because of its lower carbon dioxide emissions. Last year, Shell made a $53 billion acquisition of BG Group, which is big in the growing liquefied natural gas market. At the same time, van Beurden has abandoned some of Royal Dutch Shell’s high-profile oil ventures. He halted the unsuccessful $7 billion quest to find oil off Alaska’s Chukchi Sea coast; he sold the company’s oil, or tar, sands holdings in Alberta, and he sold some older oil fields in the North Sea. Eager to reduce debt after purchasing BG, van Beurden has sold about $30 billion worth of assets. This article is edited for clarity and brevity. You’ve said that Royal Dutch Shell was making a transition toward becoming more of a natural gas company. How is that going? It is not a just a single-minded transition from oil to gas. It is, actually, making investment choices and evolving our portfolio into what we think is very competitive but also very resilient portfolio. We’ve always seen that gas was going to be the fastest growing hydrocarbon, twice as fast as oil. And within the gas family, LNG is growing twice as fast as the average gas. Therefore, making a bet on that part of the hydrocarbon segment is a sensible choice. We have a strong focus also on petrochemicals. We believe petrochemicals, for slightly different but nevertheless fundamental demographic megatrend reasons, will continue to grow faster than GDP. But also we have to have investment strategies on renewable energy whether biofuels or straightforward investments or new business models that somehow are related. Gas is probably closest to our traditional pedigree, but also the single largest component in our growth strategy. We made a major step forward with BG. Now we are, of the international oil companies, far and away the largest LNG integrated gas player. The last time we met the United States and Europe had imposed economic sanctions on Russia over the annexation of Crimea. Does Shell believe these sanctions are still needed and how might it deal with an easing of sanctions there and in Iran, where sanctions have already been eased somewhat. We have a history in Iran but, at the moment, we have nothing in Iran. We comply with sanctions, and there is no question about it. When sanctions were put on we ceased all our activities in and with Iran as we were obligated to do. We have a trading relationship with the national oil company of Iran which is allowed under the loosened sanctions regime. We established that again. But investment in Iran is a different story. The country has lot of potential. Iranians would like to have access to modern technology like the technologies we have. We have been in a dialogue with the Iranians but ultimately we have to decide: Is the opportunity there attractive for us within the terms and conditions that would allow us to compete for capital in our portfolio? We are a long way off from making that determination. How would investing in Iran work and specifically what do we think the attitude of Europe and the United States would be toward Iran and would that be an environment that would allow us to move forward? The good thing is we have plenty of options. We are in a continuous mode of deciding which ones to move forward with within the capital discipline we have placed ourselves under. We have said we are going to invest no more than $25 billion to $30 billion a year, definitely not more than $30 billion. In today’s oil price environment probably closer to $25 billion. We are not scraping the bottom of the barrel so to speak for opportunities. Russia is a different story. We are a significant player in Russia. We have some very high quality and strategic assets. The sanctions regime on Russia is such that we are free to invest in these opportunities. Of course there are constraints on certain areas of the industry and we’re not playing in those. In terms of investments that we can do we are pursuing our venture with Gazprom in Sakhalin [Island, a giant oil and gas export facility on Russia’s east coast]. We are looking for opportunities to replicate a joint venture on the Baltic Sea, an energy project that would be very strategic for both our companies. We also have a downstream business we invest in. And we play a small role, more of a financing role, with Gazprom in the Nord Stream 2 [gas pipeline] project coming into Europe. We consider Russia in that sense a strategic partner, certainly Gazprom. Simply also because if you look at geology and geography — two things that you cannot change — it makes a lot of sense to bring gas from the largest gas resource in world close to the largest market. So there is an intrinsic rationale for developing that resource.  We want to be a player in that space. Certainly if we are free to do so. How do you view President Trump and his administration and the prospect of changes in policies? It will take some time before the policy contours become very clear. More philosophically what you could say is that this administration is clearly keen to improve the investment climate in the United States, certainly for energy. The United States is the single most important country in our portfolio by whatever metric you choose. There is no country in which we invest as much as in the United States. He wants to revive the Keystone XL pipeline in which you had originally reserved space for oil from Alberta’s oil sands. We basically sold down our oil sands position. We don’t see ourselves investing more in oil sands. We now have basically gotten out of it. To have evacuation infrastructure may still be needed but not for us. How do you see future oil and gas demand amid political pressure over carbon emissions and the changing driving habits of millennials? Will these political and demographic changes constrain the oil and gas industry? I believe what has changed most is the acceptance by ever more people that this energy transition — driven by climate change and the actions of governments, or the attitudes of millennials [and their] lifestyle changes — all that has pointed more and more toward an energy transition that is unstoppable. At same time, it is clear that the growth in energy demand is also unstoppable. And the demographics or megatrends there are that more people and more people aspire to the lifestyle of the western developed world and that also has to be accommodated. What hasn’t quite registered in people’s minds is that these two forces that compete and collide with each other and make up an exquisitely complex puzzle that we have to solve as a society. Therefore the relatively simplistic narrative that more renewables will take care of everything or that we just need to leave it in ground and everything will be fine is in my mind an impossible story to believe in. [In Western society, people say] if I can have an electric car everybody can. If I can insulate my house everybody can. And my son doesn’t have driver’s license nobody will anymore. But the big global trend is a different story altogether. It’s unfortunate. I would love for society to finally grasp the magnitude of the challenge that we are really dealing with. The opportunity set that comes with it is evolving all the time. The more we see individual governments taking actions, the more we see disruptions taking place, the more we are able to find business models that take advantage of it. For a company like ours, we aren’t in the business of just getting oil out of the ground and putting it in a pipe or into a ship and then we make money. We are a much more sophisticated company. We are not a one trick pony. We have never been a one trick pony. Increasingly we see more ways to differentiate ourselves to be not only a successful navigator in the energy transition but to be an absolute winner at the end. Many members of the Trump administration don’t believe in climate change. What are your views? We believe that climate change is real. We believe that the threat of climate change is real. And we believe that action is needed. It doesn’t mean we have to kiss hydrocarbons goodbye. In fact, we can’t. But it does mean that we have to make more intelligent choices. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries meets on May 25. How do you view OPEC? The demise of OPEC, which has many times been touted as imminent or already happened, is overdone. OPEC is a very significant voice and a very significant actor. Maybe its volumetric share is less than what it used to be decades ago, but they still have a very important role in stabilizing oil markets. In a way, stable oil markets is a good thing. My concern is not whether the oil price is $30 or $130. My concern is whether it will be oscillating. [When prices fluctuate,] people are drawn in by the hundreds of thousands and then laid off by the hundreds of thousands. Socially it is not a good thing and it creates a structure that breeds inefficiency. So I’m a great fan of stability.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

In this brand new report you find 93 in-depth tables, charts and graphs all unavailable elsewhere. The 177 page report provides clear detailed insight into the global Small Scale LNG market. Discover the key drivers and challenges affecting the market. By ordering and reading our brand new report today you stay better informed and ready to act. 1) The report provides CAPEX forecasts and analyses for the small scale LNG market and the five main submarkets from 2017-2027: • Small Scale Regasification Forecast 2017-2027 • Small Scale Liquefaction Forecast 2017-2027 • LNG Bunkering Stations Forecast 2017-2027 • LNG Fuelling Stations Forecast 2017-2027 • LNG Satellite Stations Forecast 2017-2027 2) The report includes CAPEX forecasts and an analysis of the drivers and restraints of 6 key regional/national markets from 2017 to 2027, including submarket breakdowns for each: 3) The report provides insight into the level of development and existing small scale LNG infrastructure in every regional space 4) The analysis in the report is underpinned by our exclusive interview with leading expert. 5) The report concludes with the profiles of a selection of companies and technology providers operating in the market, and lists key companies involved within the respective small scale LNG submarkets. Who should read this report? • Who should read this report? • Anyone within the LNG industry • CEOs • COOs • Business development managers • Project and site managers • Suppliers • Investors • Contractors • Government agencies • Environmental Engineers/Technicians Visiongain's study is intended for anyone requiring commercial analyses for the Small Scale LNG market and leading companies. You find data, trends and predictions. Buy our report today Small Scale Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Market Forecast 2017-2027: Liquefaction, Regasification, Satellite Station, Bunkering & Fuelling Station and Small Scale LNG Plus Profiles of Top Companies. Avoid missing out by staying informed - get our report now. To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 Aarhus Havn Adpo AGA Gas AB Air Liquide Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APCI) Albert Heijn Alpha Natural Resources Anhui Huaqiang Natural Gas Anthony Veder Apache APNG Barents NaturGass Bayernwerk AG Bechtel and Chart Energy & Chemicals BG Group Black & Veatch Blu LNG BOC Bomin Linde LNG BP Buffalo Marine Service Buquebus CCB - Gasnor CETS (CNOOC) Chart Industries, Inc. Cheniere Texas Chesapeake Energy Chevron China LNG Group Limited China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) Chinese Construction Bank (CCB) Chinese National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC) Chive Fuels Chuo Kaiun CH4 Energy Clean Energy Corp. CME Colony Energy Partners Conferenza GNL ConocoPhillips Conrad Shipyard Consol Energy Copenhagen Malmo Port COSCO Group Cryonorm BV Cryostar Group CSR Daiichi Dalian Inteh Group Danyang Dart Energy Deen Shipping DHL Bawtry DNV GL Donsotank / Jahre Marine AS Dresser Rand Dunkerque LNG DUON Elengy Enagas Encana Energigas Engie (GDF Suez) Eni ENN ENOSLNG Evergas Evol LNG Exmar ExxonMobil Fairbanks Natural Gas Fenosa Reganosa Ferus Finish Gas Association Fjord Line AS Flint Hills Resources Fluxys Fordonsgas Fortis BC Energy Fujian Energy Gas Natural GasEner SLR Gasnor Shell Gasrec Gasum Gasunie Gavle Hamn Gaz Métro LNG Gazprom GE-Energy GNF Golar LNG GoldEnergy GoldEnergy Commercializadora de Energia, S.A GoLNG INDONESIA Gyproc AS HAM Group Harvey Gulf Harvey Gulf International Marine Hawaiian Electric Company Herose Hess Corporation Hiroshima LNG Hogaki Zosen Hokkaido Gas Honeywell I.M. Skaugen InterStream Barging Itochu Jahre Marine Japan Exploration Co. Ltd (Japex) Japan Liquid Gas Jensen Maritime Jereh Group Jiangnan Shipyard Group JX Energy JX Nippon Oil & Energy Klapeidos Nafta Knutsen Kogas Kosan Crisplant Kunlun Energy Company Limited Linde Group Liquefied Natural Gas Limited Liqueline Lloyds Register LNG 24 LNG America LNG Europe B.V. LNG Hybrid LNG Silesia Manga LNG Marubeni MCGC MedoEnergi Meyer Werft GmbH Mitsui Monfort National Grid Naturgass New Times Energy New York City Department of Transportation Nihon Gas Ningbo Xinle Shipbuilding Group Noble Energy Norgas Carriers NYK Ohio Gas Company Okinawa EP Osaka Gas Oy AGA Ab Perbadanan/NYK Pertamina Perusahaan Gas Negara PetroChina Petronet PGNIG Plum Energy ONLG Polish Oil and Gas Co. Polski LNG Polski LNG - Polish Oil and Gas Co. Port of Antwerp - Exmar Portal Gas Group Preem Petroleum Corporation PT Perusahaan Listrik Negara Puget Sound Energy Reola Gaas Repsol Rolande LNG Rolls Royce Marine Royal Bodewes Royal Dutch Shell plc Saga Fjordbase Saibu Gas Sakaide LNG Salof Sendai Municipal Gas SGA: Swedish Gas Association Shaanxi Yanchang Petroleum Group Shell Shinwa Simon Loos Sinopec Skangas Skangass AS SOCAR South Korean Ministry of Trade Spectrum Spectrum LNG Stabilis Energy Statoil/AGA Stobart Group STX Offshore & Shipbuilding Swedegas Tenaska NG Fuels Tenaska NG Fuels - Waller Marine The Linde Group Toho Gas Tokyo Gas Total TOTE Travel Centers of America Tsurumi Sunmarine U.S. Maritime Administration United Shipbuilding Company Universal Shipbuilding Corporation Vanzetti Veka Deen LNG Veka Group Via Augusta Gas VICO Indonesia Vicuna Vopak Vopak - Gasunie Vos Logistics Waller Marine Wartsila Hamworthy Wuchang Shipbuilding Xilan Natural Gas Group To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com

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