Daytona Beach, FL, United States
Daytona Beach, FL, United States

Bethune-Cookman University, or simply B-CC or B-CU, is a private historically black university in Daytona Beach, Florida, United States. White Hall has been added to the US National Register of Historic Places. Wikipedia.


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PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla., May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For an extraordinary 14th time, the women of Bethune-Cookman University left Port St. Lucie as victors of the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship presented by CastleOak Securities. The 31st edition of the 54-hole, stroke-play event was contested on PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker and Ryder Courses and featured six divisions. The Bethune-Cookman women enjoyed their sixth consecutive Women’s Division victory with a three-day total of 889, defeating second place University of the Incarnate Word (919) by 30 strokes. The Wildcats were led by Mackenzie Butzer (215), whose final round, 1-under-par 71 solidified her position as the division’s medalist, finishing 1-under-par for the Championship and nine strokes ahead of teammate Alejandra Sanchez and Incarnate Word’s Madison Frerking. “Today, I had the mentality of playing easy golf,” said Butzer, who finished runner-up in the Women’s Division medalist race last year. “I worked extremely hard all year and my game has come together, finally." Not to be outdone by their fellow Wildcats, the men of Bethune-Cookman (875) claimed their fourth Men’s Division I victory in five years with a 16-stroke margin over Incarnate Word (891). Sam Sloman’s steady play and three-day total of 217 earned him the Division I medalist. A three-stroke advantage heading into Sunday’s final round grew to five for the University of Connecticut’s Nabeel Khan. He carded a final round, 4-under-par 68, the Championship’s lowest round, and fended off last year’s champion Siyan Liu (213), of Palm Beach Atlantic University, to win the Men’s Individual Invitational. A sophomore from Westerville, Ohio, Khan (208) was the only player in any division to break par in all three rounds after a 1-under-par 71 on Friday and a 3-under-par 69 on Saturday. “Any win means a lot, but this one in particular is special,” said Khan, who will tee it up tomorrow morning in a U.S. Open local qualifier at Maketewah Country Club in Cincinnati, Ohio. “I get to represent my school and where I’m from. This is a really big stepping stone for my career.” New year, same result for the Women’s Individual Invitational. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Tiana Jones (232) cruised to a five-stroke victory over the University of West Alabama’s Kaitlyn Rose (237), Jones’ fourth consecutive victory at this Championship. Jones will return to UMES in the fall for her final year in the PGA Golf Management University Program. A pair of playoffs determined the team champion and medalist honors for Men’s Division II. After finishing 54 holes knotted up at 927, Lincoln University and the University of West Alabama played two more to determine the champion. West Alabama sealed the victory with a team-combined 2-under-par on the second playoff hole, beating Lincoln by one stroke. West Alabama was led by Brannon O’Pry, who defeated Virginia State University’s Samuel Reid in a separate playoff to earn the Men’s Division II medalist. Taking home the NAIA Division trophy for the third time in four years were the Jaguars of the University of Houston-Victoria (925). Medalist honors were awarded to Juan David Coy (229), who edged out his teammates Terry Strickland and Christian Esparza by two strokes. The PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship presented by CastleOak Securities has elevated golf in minority colleges and universities by providing opportunities for players to compete in a national championship. In 2006, the PGA of America was granted complete ownership and management by the National Minority Collegiate Golf Scholarship Fund. “This is my favorite event to come to,” said Butzer, who will compete in the Canadian Amateur and Ontario Amateur this summer. “The course, people and competition are all great. It’s just a special atmosphere to be around.” For Championship information, click here A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a5979225-95cd-4496-aafc-6d2fe0ab45e9


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The staff at Notre Dame did not stand in the way as more than 100 students chose to peacefully leave their own graduation to protest commencement speaker selection. As Vice President Mike Pence took the stage at Indiana's University of Notre Dame to deliver the commencement speech Sunday, about 150 students silently got up from their seats and staged a walkout. The commencement speech was originally supposed to be delivered by President Donald Trump, making him the seventh POTUS (president of the United States) to do so in the history of the university. However, more than 1,700 students of the university signed a petition and urged the chancellor to not invite Trump to speak at the ceremony, Time reported. The protest was a planned one. “We StaND For,”a student group at the university, said in a statement May 21 it was planning to stage a walkout during the commencement exercises. “The participation and degree conferring of Pence, stand as an endorsement of policies and actions which directly contradict Catholic social teachings and values, and target vulnerable members of the University’s community,” Xitlaly Estrada, an undergraduate of the university said. Among policies supported by Pence in the past, and condemned by Notre Dame protesters, are the marginalization of civil rights of LGBTQ community, rejection of Syrian refugee resettlement program and the banning of religious minorities, including Trump’s infamous travel restrictions on six Muslim majority countries, and ruling against setting up “sanctuary cities.” Dozens of students also took to the streets of the campus, holding up signs to persuade Pence to alter his approach on issues like immigration, abortion, gun control and gay rights, the Telegraph reported. Cassandra Dimaro, a student protester, chose to walk out with her peers from her own graduation ceremony in order to show solidarity "for those of us impacted by the policies of Trump administration as well as the rhetoric Trump administration has used." She held a bouquet of flowers in her hand with her rainbow-colored graduation cap displaying the message: “Here, queer, get over it.” Dimaro’s parents too walked out with her. “We need to show the world that there has to be tolerance, and we need to be more inclusive and wrap our arms around one another, even if we have different beliefs. I’m standing with my chest puffed out right now for what she (Cassandra) did," her father told the South Bend Tribune. Pence appeared not to take notice of the ongoing protest as grabbed the microphone to deliver his speech. Instead, he praised the values and teachings of the university which urges its students to engage in free speech and expression. “This university [Notre Dame] is a vanguard of the freedom of expression and the free exchange of ideas at a time, sadly, when free speech and civility are waning on campuses across America,” he said. This was the second anti-Trump protest by college graduates that took place this month. On May 10, a group of students at Bethune-Cookman University, a historically black college in Daytona Beach, Florida, chose to turn their backs and drown the commencement speech delivered by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, in a stream of “boos” and hisses, the Atlantic reported.


PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla., May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For an extraordinary 14th time, the women of Bethune-Cookman University left Port St. Lucie as victors of the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship presented by CastleOak Securities. The 31st edition of the 54-hole, stroke-play event was contested on PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker and Ryder Courses and featured six divisions. The Bethune-Cookman women enjoyed their sixth consecutive Women’s Division victory with a three-day total of 889, defeating second place University of the Incarnate Word (919) by 30 strokes. The Wildcats were led by Mackenzie Butzer (215), whose final round, 1-under-par 71 solidified her position as the division’s medalist, finishing 1-under-par for the Championship and nine strokes ahead of teammate Alejandra Sanchez and Incarnate Word’s Madison Frerking. “Today, I had the mentality of playing easy golf,” said Butzer, who finished runner-up in the Women’s Division medalist race last year. “I worked extremely hard all year and my game has come together, finally." Not to be outdone by their fellow Wildcats, the men of Bethune-Cookman (875) claimed their fourth Men’s Division I victory in five years with a 16-stroke margin over Incarnate Word (891). Sam Sloman’s steady play and three-day total of 217 earned him the Division I medalist. A three-stroke advantage heading into Sunday’s final round grew to five for the University of Connecticut’s Nabeel Khan. He carded a final round, 4-under-par 68, the Championship’s lowest round, and fended off last year’s champion Siyan Liu (213), of Palm Beach Atlantic University, to win the Men’s Individual Invitational. A sophomore from Westerville, Ohio, Khan (208) was the only player in any division to break par in all three rounds after a 1-under-par 71 on Friday and a 3-under-par 69 on Saturday. “Any win means a lot, but this one in particular is special,” said Khan, who will tee it up tomorrow morning in a U.S. Open local qualifier at Maketewah Country Club in Cincinnati, Ohio. “I get to represent my school and where I’m from. This is a really big stepping stone for my career.” New year, same result for the Women’s Individual Invitational. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Tiana Jones (232) cruised to a five-stroke victory over the University of West Alabama’s Kaitlyn Rose (237), Jones’ fourth consecutive victory at this Championship. Jones will return to UMES in the fall for her final year in the PGA Golf Management University Program. A pair of playoffs determined the team champion and medalist honors for Men’s Division II. After finishing 54 holes knotted up at 927, Lincoln University and the University of West Alabama played two more to determine the champion. West Alabama sealed the victory with a team-combined 2-under-par on the second playoff hole, beating Lincoln by one stroke. West Alabama was led by Brannon O’Pry, who defeated Virginia State University’s Samuel Reid in a separate playoff to earn the Men’s Division II medalist. Taking home the NAIA Division trophy for the third time in four years were the Jaguars of the University of Houston-Victoria (925). Medalist honors were awarded to Juan David Coy (229), who edged out his teammates Terry Strickland and Christian Esparza by two strokes. The PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship presented by CastleOak Securities has elevated golf in minority colleges and universities by providing opportunities for players to compete in a national championship. In 2006, the PGA of America was granted complete ownership and management by the National Minority Collegiate Golf Scholarship Fund. “This is my favorite event to come to,” said Butzer, who will compete in the Canadian Amateur and Ontario Amateur this summer. “The course, people and competition are all great. It’s just a special atmosphere to be around.” For Championship information, click here A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a5979225-95cd-4496-aafc-6d2fe0ab45e9


PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla., May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- For an extraordinary 14th time, the women of Bethune-Cookman University left Port St. Lucie as victors of the PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship presented by CastleOak Securities. The 31st edition of the 54-hole, stroke-play event was contested on PGA Golf Club’s Wanamaker and Ryder Courses and featured six divisions. The Bethune-Cookman women enjoyed their sixth consecutive Women’s Division victory with a three-day total of 889, defeating second place University of the Incarnate Word (919) by 30 strokes. The Wildcats were led by Mackenzie Butzer (215), whose final round, 1-under-par 71 solidified her position as the division’s medalist, finishing 1-under-par for the Championship and nine strokes ahead of teammate Alejandra Sanchez and Incarnate Word’s Madison Frerking. “Today, I had the mentality of playing easy golf,” said Butzer, who finished runner-up in the Women’s Division medalist race last year. “I worked extremely hard all year and my game has come together, finally." Not to be outdone by their fellow Wildcats, the men of Bethune-Cookman (875) claimed their fourth Men’s Division I victory in five years with a 16-stroke margin over Incarnate Word (891). Sam Sloman’s steady play and three-day total of 217 earned him the Division I medalist. A three-stroke advantage heading into Sunday’s final round grew to five for the University of Connecticut’s Nabeel Khan. He carded a final round, 4-under-par 68, the Championship’s lowest round, and fended off last year’s champion Siyan Liu (213), of Palm Beach Atlantic University, to win the Men’s Individual Invitational. A sophomore from Westerville, Ohio, Khan (208) was the only player in any division to break par in all three rounds after a 1-under-par 71 on Friday and a 3-under-par 69 on Saturday. “Any win means a lot, but this one in particular is special,” said Khan, who will tee it up tomorrow morning in a U.S. Open local qualifier at Maketewah Country Club in Cincinnati, Ohio. “I get to represent my school and where I’m from. This is a really big stepping stone for my career.” New year, same result for the Women’s Individual Invitational. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s Tiana Jones (232) cruised to a five-stroke victory over the University of West Alabama’s Kaitlyn Rose (237), Jones’ fourth consecutive victory at this Championship. Jones will return to UMES in the fall for her final year in the PGA Golf Management University Program. A pair of playoffs determined the team champion and medalist honors for Men’s Division II. After finishing 54 holes knotted up at 927, Lincoln University and the University of West Alabama played two more to determine the champion. West Alabama sealed the victory with a team-combined 2-under-par on the second playoff hole, beating Lincoln by one stroke. West Alabama was led by Brannon O’Pry, who defeated Virginia State University’s Samuel Reid in a separate playoff to earn the Men’s Division II medalist. Taking home the NAIA Division trophy for the third time in four years were the Jaguars of the University of Houston-Victoria (925). Medalist honors were awarded to Juan David Coy (229), who edged out his teammates Terry Strickland and Christian Esparza by two strokes. The PGA Minority Collegiate Golf Championship presented by CastleOak Securities has elevated golf in minority colleges and universities by providing opportunities for players to compete in a national championship. In 2006, the PGA of America was granted complete ownership and management by the National Minority Collegiate Golf Scholarship Fund. “This is my favorite event to come to,” said Butzer, who will compete in the Canadian Amateur and Ontario Amateur this summer. “The course, people and competition are all great. It’s just a special atmosphere to be around.” For Championship information, click here A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a5979225-95cd-4496-aafc-6d2fe0ab45e9


News Article | May 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

More than 100 students and their family members have walked out of Vice President Mike Pence’s commencement speech at Notre Dame University in protest over his stance on LGBTQ issues and refugees. Mr Pence, who was born not far from the northern Indiana campus, addressed the graduating class on Sunday. “Your education here has prepared you for a life of service to your families, to your communities, and to our country,” he said. But student organisers had been quietly planning their response to Mr Pence for months, ever since he was announced as the commencement speaker. Brian Ricketts, one of the group’s leaders and a former Notre Dame student body president, told IndyStar that many students were “upset and hurt” by the decision to invite Mr Pence because his “policies have impacted the humanity of certain graduates”. A press release from the student activist group pointed to Mr Pence’s anti-LGBTQ and anti-refugee policies as governor of Indiana, and his support of the Donald Trump’s travel ban and threats to sanctuary cities as vice president. “We will walk out in silence, with respect for the human dignity of those with whom we disagree and with an invitation to the rest of the community to build an inclusive future together,” the press release said. As Mr Pence took to the stage, the students stood and walked out of the stadium. The group later claimed more than 100 had participated in the walkout. The protest came weeks after Betsy DeVos, Donald Trump's secretary of education, was drowned out by boos during her commencement speech at Bethune-Cookman University. Even before the walkout, Notre Dame valedictorian C J Pine staged his own form of protest, condemning Islamophobic and anti-immigrant sentiments in his speech to the graduates. “If we are going to build walls between American students and international students, then I am skewered on the fence," said Mr Pine, who was raised in China. Mr Pence, meanwhile, used his speech to warn against attacks on freedom of speech. "While this institution has maintained an atmosphere of civility and open debate, far too many campuses across America have become characterised by speech codes, safe zones, tone policing, administration-sanctioned political correctness, all of which amounts to nothing less than suppression of the freedom of speech,” he said. Mr Pence is the first vice president ever to give a commencement speech at Notre Dame, but follows a long line of newly inaugurated presidents to do so: Dwight Eisenhower, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H W Bush, George W Bush, and Barack Obama. Conservatives protested against Mr Obama’s commencement speech in 2009 because of his support of abortion rights and several non-student protesters were arrested for trespassing. No arrests have been reported so far this year.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

President Donald Trump speaks as he meets with leaders of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared Sunday that his support for historically black colleges and universities remains "unwavering." Trump sought to clarify an earlier statement that some higher education officials interpreted to mean that he planned to end a capital financing program that helps these institutions repair, renovate and build new facilities. Congressional Black Caucus members criticized the move. The earlier statement was attached to a spending bill Trump signed Friday to keep the government operating through September. Trump said in the signing statement that the administration "shall treat provisions that allocate benefits on the basis of race, ethnicity and gender ... in a manner consistent with the requirement to afford equal protection of the laws" under the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment. The Historically Black College and University Capital Financing Program Account was one of several programs named in that section of the statement. In response, Reps. John Conyers, D-Mich., and Cedric Richmond, D-La., who is chairman of the black caucus, said Trump's statement was "misinformed factually" and not "grounded in any serious constitutional analysis." "For a president who pledged to reach out to African-Americans and other minorities, this statement is stunningly careless and divisive. We urge him to reconsider immediately," the lawmakers said in a statement. Trump said Sunday that the earlier statement spelled out "my intention to spend the funds it appropriates, including the funds for historically black colleges and universities, consistently with my responsibilities under the Constitution. It does not affect my unwavering support for HBCUs and their critical educational missions." Trump highlighted his signing of an executive order earlier this year to move an office dedicated to these institutions from the Education Department to the White House. The order also directs the office to help these institutions become financially stronger, among other steps. Trump also noted that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos plans to deliver her first commencement address this week at Bethune-Cookman University, a historically black university founded in Daytona Beach, Florida, by civil rights activist Mary McLeod Bethune. Watch NBC Nightly News on Yahoo View, available on iOS and Android.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One prior to his departure from Morristown Municipal Airport, Sunday, May 7, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is returning to Washington after spending the weekend at his New Jersey golf course. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared Sunday that his support for historically black colleges and universities remains "unwavering." Trump sought to clarify an earlier statement that some higher education officials interpreted to mean that he planned to end a capital financing program that helps these institutions repair, renovate and build new facilities. Congressional Black Caucus members criticized the move. The earlier statement was attached to a spending bill Trump signed Friday to keep the government operating through September. Trump said in the signing statement that the administration "shall treat provisions that allocate benefits on the basis of race, ethnicity and gender ... in a manner consistent with the requirement to afford equal protection of the laws" under the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment. The Historically Black College and University Capital Financing Program Account was one of several programs named in that section of the statement. In response, Reps. John Conyers, D-Mich., and Cedric Richmond, D-La., who is chairman of the black caucus, said Trump's statement was "misinformed factually" and not "grounded in any serious constitutional analysis." "For a president who pledged to reach out to African-Americans and other minorities, this statement is stunningly careless and divisive. We urge him to reconsider immediately," the lawmakers said in a statement. Trump said Sunday that the earlier statement spelled out "my intention to spend the funds it appropriates, including the funds for historically black colleges and universities, consistently with my responsibilities under the Constitution. It does not affect my unwavering support for HBCUs and their critical educational missions." Trump highlighted his signing of an executive order earlier this year to move an office dedicated to these institutions from the Education Department to the White House. The order also directs the office to help these institutions become financially stronger, among other steps. Trump also noted that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos plans to deliver her first commencement address this week at Bethune-Cookman University, a historically black university founded in Daytona Beach, Florida, by civil rights activist Mary McLeod Bethune.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of Florida for 2017. A total of 45 schools received honors for their online education offerings, with University of Florida, University of Miami, Florida State University, University of South Florida-Main Campus, Jacksonville University, Tallahassee Community College and Florida Keys Community College earning top spots overall. More than a dozen unique data points were evaluated to determine each school’s score. “The schools on our Best Online Schools list for Florida all meet high standards of excellence for students who want to succeed outside of a brick-and-mortar classroom,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. Colleges and universities on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included. Qualifications include being institutionally accredited and holding public or private not-for-profit status. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes the student/teacher ratio, graduation rate, employment services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Florida’s Best Online Schools for 2017 include the following: Adventist University of Health Sciences Ave Maria University Barry University Bethune-Cookman University Broward College City College-Fort Lauderdale Daytona State College Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide Everglades University Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Florida Atlantic University Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Institute of Technology Florida International University Florida Keys Community College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Florida State University Hobe Sound Bible College Hodges University Indian River State College Jacksonville University Johnson & Wales University-North Miami Keiser University-Ft. Lauderdale Lynn University Nova Southeastern University Palm Beach Atlantic University Saint Leo University South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary Southeastern University St. Petersburg College St. Thomas University State College of Florida-Manatee-Sarasota Stetson University Tallahassee Community College The Baptist College of Florida The University of West Florida Trinity College of Florida University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Miami University of North Florida University of South Florida-Main Campus Warner University Webber International University ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 479.47K | Year: 2014

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers. The project at Bethune-Cookman University seeks to enhance undergraduate education in the biology department by developing a curriculum that focuses on quantitative expertise. Students will be taught how to work with large data sets to understand biological systems and to solve problems in biology. Assessment metrics that integrate quantitative literacy, scientific literacy and strategic learning will be developed as part of the overall evaluation of the project.

The goal of the project is to provide learning experiences for undergraduate biology majors to develop quantitative and computational skills for biological discovery and analysis. The project has two specific objectives: 1) to infuse data science competencies in research-oriented courses and 2) to develop three new courses. The project will infuse concepts of data flow, data analytics and data curation in a series of five research-oriented biology core courses. The new courses will be in the areas of bioinstrumentation, cloud computing and computational genetics. Bethune-Cookman University will undertake critical activities to create an adoptable model for core curriculum improvement in biology undergraduate programs. These activities include development and assessment of course resources and learning strategies; evaluation by students and faculty; disciplinary education research by students and faculty; and dissemination.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 349.88K | Year: 2016

Bethune-Cookman University is examining the effects of socioscientific argumentation learning and development on student success in STEM. The overarching purpose of the research is to investigate how to produce STEM graduates with argumentation expertise to address ill-structured problems that require scientific, evidence-based reasoning to inform decisions. The researchers will structure an intervention around units of biology and environmental science courses focused on scientific issues and conduct a three-phase research study. The Phase I pilot will determine the current argumentation level of STEM students and analyze the pilot data to identify gaps in effective socioscientific argumentation development. In Phase II, the researchers will develop and adapt a socioscientific argumentation learning training system for students. Phase III will be an experimental study to investigate the effect of socioscientific argumentation training on student outcomes. The significance of the study is that the findings can be used to provide students with skills and competencies needed for graduate school or the STEM workforce; namely, evaluation of evidence, construction of arguments, and evaluation of competing arguments.

The researchers will use a quasi-experimental design to answer three research questions: 1) What socioscientific argumentation strategies do the students currently use? 2) What gaps exist in effective socioscientific argumentation? 3) Does socioscientific argumentation instruction influence student outcomes? In Phase 1, they will use socioscientific issues at the nexus of food, energy, and water for questionnaires, written reports, and debates to collect data on students decision-making process, tendency to engage in arguments, argumentation levels, and quality of argumentative structures. The researchers will use several rubrics and socioscientific argumentation models to analyze data collected in Phase 1. They then propose to conduct a pre- and post- comparison of the quality of arguments on socioscientific issues between intervention and comparison groups. Measures of student academic success will be assessed from the dimensions of academic achievement, career success, attainment of learning outcomes, persistence, acquisition of skills and competencies, and satisfaction. The research will produce information needed to develop intervention models for improving scientific argumentation skills development of STEM students.

This project is supported by the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) Broadening Participation Research in Education track. This program track supports ideas to create and study new models and innovations in STEM teaching and learning, investigate the underlying issues affecting the differential participation and success rates of students from underrepresented groups, and produce knowledge to inform STEM education practices and interventions.

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