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Boston, MA, United States

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. It was formed out of the 1996 merger of Beth Israel Hospital and New England Deaconess Hospital . Among independent teaching hospitals, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center consistently ranks in the top three recipients of biomedical research funding from the National Institutes of Health. Research funding totals nearly $200 million annually. BIDMC researchers run more than 850 active sponsored projects and 200 clinical trials. The Harvard-Thorndike General Clinical Research Center, the oldest clinical research laboratory in the United States, has been located on this site since 1973. Wikipedia.


Khrapko K.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Nature Genetics | Year: 2011

Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA build up in aging tissues and are thought to contribute to physiological aging. Surprisingly, it is not known if these mutations occur early or late in life. A new study looks at mechanisms of accelerated mitochondrial aging in HIV-infected individuals treated with nucleoside analog anti-retroviral drugs and offers support for an early origin of mitochondrial DNA mutations. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.


Ahmed M.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Radiology | Year: 2014

Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014.


Rosenzweig A.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Science | Year: 2012

The heart has greater potential for repair than once appreciated - whether this can be exploited clinically remains an open question.


Zhang G.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Blood | Year: 2013

The endothelium, as the interface between blood and all tissues, plays a critical role in inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid, highly abundant in plasma, that potently regulates endothelial responses through interaction with its receptors (S1PRs). Here, we studied the role of S1PR2 in the regulation of the proadhesion and proinflammatory phenotype of the endothelium. By using genetic approaches and a S1PR2-specific antagonist (JTE013), we found that S1PR2 plays a key role in the permeability and inflammatory responses of the vascular endothelium during endotoxemia. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras (S1pr2(+/+) → S1pr2(+/+), S1pr2(+/+) → S1pr2(-/-), and S1pr2(-/-) → S1pr2(+/+)) indicate the critical role of S1PR2 in the stromal compartment, in the regulation of vascular permeability and vascular inflammation. In vitro, JTE013 potently inhibited tumor necrosis factor α-induced endothelial inflammation. Finally, we provide detailed mechanisms on the downstream signaling of S1PR2 in vascular inflammation that include the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase pathway that, together with the Rho-kinase nuclear factor kappa B pathway (NF-kB), are required for S1PR2-mediated endothelial inflammatory responses. Taken together, our data indicate that S1PR2 is a key regulator of the proinflammatory phenotype of the endothelium and identify S1PR2 as a novel therapeutic target for vascular disorders.


Medici D.,Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Nature medicine | Year: 2010

Mesenchymal stem cells can give rise to several cell types, but varying results depending on isolation methods and tissue source have led to controversies about their usefulness in clinical medicine. Here we show that vascular endothelial cells can transform into multipotent stem-like cells by an activin-like kinase-2 (ALK2) receptor-dependent mechanism. In lesions from individuals with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a disease in which heterotopic ossification occurs as a result of activating ALK2 mutations, or from transgenic mice expressing constitutively active ALK2, chondrocytes and osteoblasts expressed endothelial markers. Lineage tracing of heterotopic ossification in mice using a Tie2-Cre construct also suggested an endothelial origin of these cell types. Expression of constitutively active ALK2 in endothelial cells caused endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and acquisition of a stem cell-like phenotype. Similar results were obtained by treatment of untransfected endothelial cells with the ligands transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) or bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) in an ALK2-dependent manner. These stem-like cells could be triggered to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes or adipocytes. We suggest that conversion of endothelial cells to stem-like cells may provide a new approach to tissue engineering.

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