St. George's, Bermuda
St. George's, Bermuda

The Bermuda Institute of Ocean science is an independent, non-profit marine science and education institute located in Ferry Reach, St. George's, Bermuda. The Institute, founded in 1903 as the Bermuda Biological Station, hosts a full-time faculty of oceanographers, biologists, and environmental scientists, graduate and undergraduate students, K-12 groups, and Road Scholar groups. BIOS’s strategic mid-Atlantic Ocean location has at its doorstep a diverse marine environment, with close proximity to deep ocean as well as coral reef and near shore habitats.Prior to 5 September 2006, BIOS was known as the Bermuda Biological Station for Research . Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 858.37K | Year: 2017

The physical properties of the ocean from the surface layers to the abyssal water masses are changing in concert with natural and anthropogenically influenced physical forcing and sustained observations of the ocean are critically important to establish these rates of change. One of the longest open-ocean hydrographic stations in the world is maintained at the Hydrostation S site (formerly known as the Panulirus site) located about 25 km southeast of Bermuda in the North Atlantic Ocean. This repeat biweekly hydrographic observations was initiated by Henry Stommel and co-workers in 1954. Now, in its seventh decade, it continues to be recognized as one of the most important sustained ocean time-series and provides an invaluable metric for the long-term state of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre in relation to the meridional overturning circulation, western boundary transport, and gyre recirculation. For example, the upper ocean warming trend has strengthened (about 0.8° C since the 1970s) while the deep Labrador Sea has cooled by a few tenths of a degree. The signature of deoxygenation has been observed at Hydrostation S in the upper ocean (about 7 micro-moles/kg/decade decrease in dissolved oxygen) as well as an intensification and expansion of the oxygen minimum zone. These changes suggest that the North Atlantic subtropical gyre is experiencing deoxygenation as in the Pacific Ocean as a result of increased upper ocean stratification and reduced solubility of oxygen in warmer waters. The Hydrostation S program and its data set are managed as a service to the ocean community, being openly distributed and used as a resource in understanding processes and patterns of variability in the ocean, as well as for education, mentorship and outreach activities. The Hydrostation S project will contribute to the research and training of six research specialists and research technicians at BIOS and contribute to the research projects of at least three Ph.D. students through on-going educational partnership with Princeton University and the University of Southampton in the U.K. The one-day Hydrostation S research cruises are an ideal platform for testing new sensors and for providing hand-on training to undergraduate students enrolled in summer programs.


The Hydrostation S project is designed to address the overarching hypothesis that the physical properties of the upper-ocean to deep-ocean are changing in concert with natural and anthropogenically influenced physical forcing. Sustained observations of the ocean, such as those from Hydrostation S, remain critically important to establish rates of change to provide quantitative empirical data for myriad regional and global ocean synthesis and modeling of ocean processes and future ocean change. The major objective of Hydrostation S into the seventh decade is to continue the frequent water column sampling of temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen (and indirectly, sampling of important ocean carbon time?series) of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Such work is complementary to other sustained observations such as the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) and Ocean Flux Program (OFP). As for the past five years, two CTD profiles will be conducted to better capture the deep-water variability while maintaining all the previous discrete depths. The first CTD cast will profile to full ocean depth (3,200-3,500 m) while the second CTD cast will profile from the surface to 500 m to allow for biogeochemical instrumentation not rated for full ocean depth and to support ancillary studies of ocean physics, biological processes and biogeochemistry. A secondary objective will be to build upon the collaborative comparison of physical data collected as part of two autonomous sensor projects. In the latter stages of the project, as ocean glider deployment becomes more sustainable and reliable, collaborative and comparative efforts will be used to test the capability of ocean gliders to provide data of sufficient quality to detect long-term oceanic change in a virtual mooring time-series mode. The robust and highly accurate Hydrostation S data will be used to test the capability of emerging technologies over the next five to ten years.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 1.14M | Year: 2015

Since 1978, the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) has continuously measured particle movement, known as particle flux, from surface waters to the deep Sargasso Sea, revealing important information about changing ocean chemistry. It is the longest-running particle flux time series and is unique in its focus on the deep ocean. This award will continue funding this fundamental oceanographic time-series, lengthening the record of data and allowing for a better understanding of how the observed flux patterns relate to the interplay between climate and ocean functioning. Continued support of the time series will provide training and educational opportunities for young scientists from high school students through postdoctoral researchers, and results will tie into other time-series efforts in the Bermuda region.

Understanding of ocean variability over interannual and decadal time-scales is of widespread interest and increasing relevance given the concerns over anthropogenic perturbations of global climate and ocean chemistry due to increases in greenhouse gases. Ocean ecosystems are now well-recognized to be affected by global and regional climate patterns such as ENSO and the North Atlantic Oscillation, and an imperative exists to model the ocean?s response to future climate scenarios. This requires a fundamental understanding of how the ocean and its biota naturally respond to climate and environmental forcing variables, and how these responses, in turn, affect ocean biogeochemical cycles. The OFP time-series has produced a unique unsurpassed record of temporal variability in the biological pump, a term loosely applied to material transfer from the surface to the deep ocean. The record has documented interannual and longer variations in deep fluxes and shorter term fluctuations driven by the interactions between mesoscale physical variability, meteorological forcing and ecosystem responses. The OFP sample archives are an unparalleled resource for study of the biogeochemical consequences of changing ocean chemistry.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 4.70M | Year: 2013

Long-term time series are a powerful tool for investigating ocean physics and biogeochemistry, its effects on the global carbon cycle, and its response to climate change. In particular, the research goals of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) program at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) have been, and continue to be, improving our understanding of the time-varying components of the ocean carbon cycle, related biogenic elements of interest (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus, silica), and identifying the relevant physical, chemical and ecosystem properties responsible for this variability. The existing 24 years of data from BATS provide robust constraints on seasonal and year-over-year variability, the response of the Sargasso Sea ecosystem to natural climate variability and detection of potential climate change signals. Multi-decadal observations at BATS also provide critically needed rates of change in the ocean carbon cycle, CO2 sinks-sources in the North Atlantic and the longest global record of ocean acidification.

Throughout its twenty-five years of operation, the objectives of BATS have been: (1) to document the temporal variability in nutrient cycles and biological communities; (2) to quantify the role of ocean-atmosphere coupling and climate forcing on air-sea exchange of CO2, and carbon export to the ocean interior; (3) to study the role of physical forcing (e.g., surface fluxes of heat, freshwater and momentum) on planktonic community structure and function, including new and export productivity; (4) to study the role of climate-induced variability in surface fluxes on planktonic community structure and function, and (5) to provide for development/validation of new oceanographic tools and technologies.

This renewal award to BIOS and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences will provide funding to continue the BATS program through years 26-30. While continuing the core goals, the research team will address several new long-term questions that have developed from the previous BATS data. These questions are related to the: (1) impact of eddies on interannual variability in winter mixing; (2) detection of climate change signals in surface and deep waters of the Sargasso; (3) impact of ocean acidification on primary production, partitioning of freshly produced organic carbon between dissolved and particulate phases and remineralization of sedimenting carbon; (4) coupling of particulate and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, controlling mechanisms and their relationships to the canonical Redfield Ratio, and; (5) reconciliation of integrative geochemical estimates of carbon export and the variety of observational records of carbon export.

Broader Impacts: The BATS program has strong and diverse broader impacts, contributing to the field of ocean sciences by providing high quality ocean observations and data for empiricists and modelers, and a framework from which researchers can conceive and test hypotheses. Indeed, a number of focused process-oriented research programs (e.g., EDDIES, TROPHIC BATS) have spun off from hypotheses arising from BATS data. BATS and these related programs continue to generate a large number of well-cited publications that make important contributions to the field and advance our understanding of the oceans. PIs of the BATS program have been and continue to be dedicated to the training and mentorship of both undergraduate and graduate students (including those with direct BATS PIs supervision and others via ancillary programs). The oceanographic facilities at BIOS allow the project team to train students and technicians and to collaborate with other researchers in a manner few other institutions can provide. Through hands-on laboratory, cruise and data synthesis activities, BATS will continue to directly aid the U.S. national effort to improve the understanding of the oceanic carbon cycle and the impact on global climate


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: EDUCATION/HUMAN RESOURCES,OCE | Award Amount: 268.54K | Year: 2015

The Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) will host a Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program located at the BIOS marine research station in Bermuda. The program is held during the fall semester (12 weeks) and introduces eight undergraduate students per year to the techniques, skills and intellectual processes required to conduct research in oceanography and the marine sciences. Many REU research projects fall within the framework of the numerous long-term oceanographic programs at BIOS, but students also have opportunities to focus on near-shore processes including coral reef ecology, marine biodiversity, molecular biology, marine and atmospheric pollution and climate change. All REU students, regardless of project, have the opportunity to join BIOS scientists for a research cruise aboard the R/V Atlantic Explorer. BIOS has an active education program that insures a diverse graduate student population, providing REU students with opportunities to interact with visiting students from Canada, the USA and the UK. Students also meet local scientists from the Bermuda Government and from industry. Students leave the program better prepared to pursue professional careers and/or graduate programs by virtue of conducting mentored research projects including the design, implementation, analysis, and final write-up.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 218.74K | Year: 2016

A request is made to fund new and replacement instrumentation on the R/V Atlantic Explorer, a 168? general purpose research vessel owned and operated by Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) as part of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System. BIOS is a U.S. 501 (c) 3 and 509 (a) not-for profit research and educational institution incorporated in the state of New York, and geographically located on the Island of Bermuda. The mission of the ship is to support funded science research throughout the Central Atlantic but specifically work in support of the BATS program. RV Atlantic Explorer had 157 days funded in 2015, all but 38 of which (76%) were for NSF. In 20165, the vessel is scheduled to sail 160 days with 120 (75%) of them funded by NSF. With this proposal, BIOS provides technical descriptions and rationale for the acquisition of the following Oceanographic Instrumentation:

CTD System Upgrades $156,617
Meteorological System Upgrades $20,367
Data Acquisition System and Network Upgrades $20,260
$197,244
Broader Impacts
The principal impact of the present proposal is under Merit Review Criterion 2 of the Proposal Guidelines (NSF 13-589). It provides infrastructure support for scientists to use the vessel and its shared-use instrumentation in support of their NSF-funded oceanographic research projects (which individually undergo separate review by the relevant research program of NSF). The acquisition, maintenance and operation of shared-use instrumentation allows NSF-funded researchers from any US university or lab access to working, calibrated instruments for their research, reducing the cost of that research, and expanding the base of potential researchers.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FIELD STATIONS | Award Amount: 332.56K | Year: 2016

The ocean ecosystem is a shared resource that provides food and oxygen while playing an important role in global cycles of carbon and nutrients. The oceans are, however, threatened by a number of human induced changes including increases in temperature, nutrients, CO2 and chemicals. In order to understand how the changing ocean environment influences the biology of marine organisms, scientists must run controlled experiments exploring the effects of many types of stressors, carefully quantifying their individual and combined effects. The Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS; www.bios.edu ) - an independent U.S. not-for-profit organization and a Bermuda Registered Charity - is uniquely located on a seagrass and coral platform with easy access to the open ocean of the North Atlantic, providing the opportunity to perform manipulative experiments on a diverse array of organisms. A new Environmental Change Research Facility (ECRF) will be established at BIOS, initiating the capability for studies involving multiple environmental stressors associated with the effects of global climate change. This will consist of two environmental rooms, integrated into the pre-existing flow-through seawater, and CO2 exposure facilities that will allow for experiments at multiple temperatures. Many of the organisms of interest are small in size (i.e. juvenile coral through to bacteria), and many of the processes require specialized stains to visualize. Thus, the facility will also include a new microscope that will allow analyses at a broad range of sizes (petri dish to single cell) and that is capable of quantifying changes in organism development, calcification, and species composition. With the addition of both the environmental chambers and the microscope, the range of experiments that can be run at BIOS will be substantially expanded. BIOS hosts a large number of visiting scientists, and BIOS researchers participate in ongoing scientific collaborations with external scientists, many with NSF-supported research programs, such that the ECRF equipment will have a far reaching impact on the research capacity of the marine sciences community as a whole. The facility will also support the primary goal of the internships and courses at BIOS: to immerse students in experiential learning through research in the ocean sciences. This can be a seminal change for many students whose home institutions lack programs in marine science or the opportunity to conduct independent research. Education experiences at BIOS can influence decisions that determine STEM education and career trajectories, with students leaving our programs better prepared to pursue professional careers and/or graduate programs. The ECRF will provide opportunities to train undergraduate and graduate students in complex multi-stressor studies, fostering a next generation of scientists with the interdisciplinary skillset required to address the pressing questions of environmental change in the marine environment.

One of the major objectives in modern biological oceanography is to understand how the myriad of co-occurring anthropogenic stressors influence marine organisms and determine how these will modify global biogeochemical cycles. The objective of this grant is to establish an Environmental Change Research Facility (ECRF) designed to test and quantify the effects of multiple anthropogenic stressors on the marine environment (including temperature, nutrients, CO2, low O2, and toxicants). Due to its unique location in the oligotrophic North Atlantic gyre, BIOS provides access to a broad array of marine systems, including open ocean, near-shore coral reef, seagrass and mangrove ecosystems. The accessibility of these biomes via BIOS?s fleet of research vessels is complimented by the presence of a flowing seawater laboratory and CO2 exposure system where manipulative experiments can be conducted. This grant supports the installation of two environmental rooms that, by providing both thermal stability for process studies and opportunities for controlled multi-stressor experiments, will substantially expand the types of research that could be pursued at BIOS by resident scientists, visiting researchers and students. Many of the organisms of interest ? planktonic zooplankton, calcifying foraminifera or algae, bacteria and viruses, and early-life stages of benthic organisms such as sea urchins and coral ? are quite small. In order to quantify and visualize the response of this wide size-range of organisms, the facility will also include a new microscope, capable of visualizing changes in organism development and calcification, as well as cell enumeration. This instrument will increase the in-house observational capabilities for both preserved and live imaging and provide the capacity to precisely control image positioning to allow for time lapse capture of growth, biomineralization and dissolution. With the addition of this instrumentation, scientists and visiting researchers will be in a position to address the pressing questions of how environmental parameters affect the function of marine organisms, including biomineralization, development, ageing, biogeochemical cycling, community composition, microevolution and subsequently ecosystem function and human health impacts. They ensure the continued success and growth of an already transformative program in microbial oceanography by expanding the capacity to execute and analyze process studies in a controlled environment. Paralleling the benefits to basic research, the ECRF facility will be available for use with student internships and BIOS courses. Since 2011, BIOS has hosted over 800 students annually, most of them from US institutions. The ECRF will provide opportunities to train undergraduate and graduate students to conduct and analyze complex multi-stressor studies, fostering a next generation of scientists with the interdisciplinary skillset required to address the pressing questions of environmental change.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: FIELD STATIONS AND MARINE LABS | Award Amount: 174.20K | Year: 2015

In order to fully characterize and understand both regional and global climate, as well as fundamental ocean processes and functions, scientists are required to collect a wealth of information. Certain questions, such as how the ocean responds to global climate change, can only be answered by in-depth analysis of data collected continuously over a significantly long period of time, also known as a time-series study. The Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) (www.bios.edu), an independent U.S. not-for-profit organization and a Bermuda Registered Charity, is home to several of the longest running, open-ocean time-series research programs in the world (Hydrostation S, the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Program and the Ocean Flux Program (OFP)). Bermudas unique geographic position in close proximity to the open ocean, combined with BIOS oceanographic support infrastructure, provide an ideal venue for research initiatives that address pressing issues in the ocean sciences. The new Flow Cytometry and Molecular Multi-User Facility (FCMMF) at BIOS will provide access to basic molecular instrumentation, in-house flow cytometer (laser-based technology used in cell counting, cell sorting and biomarker detection) and devices to vertically sample the ocean. This project will expand the number of important questions that can be locally addressed, while reducing the cost and risk associated with shipping samples off-island for all users. The large number of visiting scientists and ongoing scientific collaborations with external scientists, many with NSF-supported research programs, means that the equipment provided by the FCMMF will have a far reaching impact on the research capacity of the marine sciences community as a whole. Importantly, the FCMMF will assist BIOS in meeting the increasing student demand for research training in cutting-edge techniques. The educational goal of BIOS is to immerse students in experiential learning through research in the ocean sciences. This can be a seminal change for many students whose institutions lack programs in marine science or the opportunity to conduct independent research. Education experiences at BIOS can influence decisions that determine STEM education and career trajectories, with students leaving better prepared to pursue professional careers and/or graduate programs.

This new facility includes field sampling equipment that will provide a mechanism to collect individuals of the planktonic community (nano to mesoplankton) in a vertically stratified way. The chosen dry lab equipment platforms are characterized by their versatility, easy use and low maintenance. The Flow Cytometer model will allow the analysis of particles from 50 nm to 200 ìm in diameter, facilitating a wide spectrum of studies, from environmental microbial ecology to eukaryotic cell biology. The modularity capability of this unit will allow for future improvement and expansion if desired. The molecular component of the facility will allow basic analyses and also support sample preparation for next-generation sequencing. The FCMMF will benefit a wide range of research programs at BIOS, as well as those of visiting scientists. Paralleling the benefits to basic research, the FCMMF facility has been explicitly designed for use with student internships, current BIOS courses and the development of new courses, particularly a modern biological oceanography course. Since 2010, BIOS has hosted an average of 105 visiting scientists and over 750 students annually, most of them from US institutions. The FCMMF allows BIOS to provide scientists and students with the ability to address numerous and diverse biological questions. In addition to biological oceanography, this project will benefit a wide variety of research programs including genome structure and gene expression in marine invertebrates, larval longevity and gene flow in corals, temporal and spatial fine-scale characterization of open ocean microbial and eukaryotic communities, organismal response to ocean acidification, and the biological processes influencing ocean-atmosphere gas exchange of carbon.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SHIPBOARD SCIENTIFIC SUPP EQUI | Award Amount: 64.92K | Year: 2016

A request is made to fund new and replacement instrumentation on the R/V Atlantic Explorer, a 168? general purpose research vessel owned and operated by Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science (BIOS) as part of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System. BIOS is a U.S. 501 (c) 3 and 509 (a) not-for profit research and educational institution incorporated in the state of New York, and geographically located on the Island of Bermuda. The mission of the ship is to support funded science research throughout the Central Atlantic but specifically work in support of the BATS program. RV Atlantic Explorer had 157 days funded in 2015, all but 38 of which (76%) were for NSF. In 20165, the vessel is scheduled to sail 160 days with 120 (75%) of them funded by NSF. With this proposal, BIOS provides technical descriptions and rationale for the acquisition of the following Shipboard Scientific Support Equipment:

Steering Control System Upgrade $47,682
Bow Thruster Control System Upgrade $98,880
Ballast Water Treatment System $162,588
Marine Sanitation Device $89,901
Doppler Speed Log $64,922
Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS) $46,510
$510,483

Broader Impacts
The principal impact of the present proposal is under Merit Review Criterion 2 of the Proposal Guidelines (NSF 13-589). It provides infrastructure support for scientists to use the vessel and its shared-use instrumentation in support of their NSF-funded oceanographic research projects (which individually undergo separate review by the relevant research program of NSF). The acquisition, maintenance and operation of shared-use instrumentation allows NSF-funded researchers from any US university or lab access to working, calibrated instruments for their research, reducing the cost of that research, and expanding the base of potential researchers.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 82.40K | Year: 2015

Human carbon dioxide emissions are causing measureable changes in ocean conditions. Many of these changes negatively affect coral reef ecosystems, reducing their ability to provide food, arable land, tourist destinations and coastline protection for hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This project focuses on the effects of enhanced stratification, caused by ocean warming, on the growth of reef-building corals across the Caribbean and Bermuda. Enhanced stratification impacts primary productivity which generates food for corals. Initial data generated by the investigators suggest that Atlantic coral growth has declined in the last 5 decades in response to these changes. A laboratory-based experiment is designed to test this hypothesis. If verified, the projected decline in Atlantic primary productivity through the 21st century could potentially rival and will certainly exacerbate the effects of warming and ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems across the North Atlantic. Support is provided for graduate research, and undergraduate participation is facilitated through the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Summer Fellowship and the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences-Princeton Environmental Institute Summer Internship Programs. The results will be presented at national and international meetings and disseminated in a timely manner through peer-reviewed publications. All data produced through this program will be archived in the Biological and Chemical Oceanographic Data Management Office.

Anthropogenic climate change has emerged as a principle threat to coral reef survival in the 21st century. In addition to ocean warming and acidification, global climate models project enhanced stratification of the upper oceans through the 21st century and a consequent decline in productivity, by up to 50%, in the North Atlantic. This project employs controlled laboratory manipulation experiments to test the link between productivity and growth of the dominant reef-building corals across the Caribbean and Bermuda. Preliminary data generated by the investigators, including multi-decade long coral growth histories and nitrogen isotope ratios of coral tissue and skeleton, suggest that coral growth across the region has declined over the past 50 years in response to productivity changes already underway. If the link between ocean circulation, productivity decline, and coral growth is verified, the projected 21st century decline in productivity could rival and will certainly exacerbate the effects of warming and ocean acidification on North Atlantic coral reef ecosystems.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 116.99K | Year: 2015

This project will extend for five years and enhance the multi-decadal oceanographic observations from the MV Oleander, a container vessel that on a weekly schedule crosses four distinct regions, namely the continental shelf, Slope Sea, Gulf Stream and Sargasso Sea on its route between New Jersey and Bermuda. The enhancements include an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) pair that will provide direct measurement of the currents through the base of the thermocline to about 1200 m depth in the open ocean on the one hand, and high vertical resolution profiling of the upper ocean on the other. The former will enable research into the full upper ocean structure of the Gulf Stream, the mesoscale eddy field, and the highly variable Sargasso Sea, all of which are important components in the large scale ocean circulation including the climatically important meridional overturning circulation (MOC). The latter will greatly improve coverage on the continental shelf, shelfbreak front and resolution of the mixed layer seasonal thermocline structure.

The Oleander track is uniquely situated as it enables in situ measurements across the shelf and slope, through the southernmost extension of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre, and into the subtropical gyre. The beauty of these ADCP snapshots is that they tell us what the ocean is doing over a wide range of scales. Ensemble averaging these leads to robust data sets that will contribute to continued and deeper investigations into (1) seasonal, and interannual to decadal variability on the mid-Atlantic Bight shelf, (2) dynamics controlling the communication between the shelf and open ocean, (3) connectivity along western boundaries in the MOC at different latitudes, and (4) interannual to decadal variability in the Gulf Stream position, strength and the structure of the subpolar gyre, and the recirculation in the Sargasso Sea. In addition, the high horizontal resolution of surface salinity, temperature and velocity afforded by individual tracks will enable continued investigation into sub-mesoscale processes. A replacement ship is expected to enter service in the second or third year of the project. With the installation of two new ADCPs on the new hull, one for improved shelf-slope operation and one to profile to 1200 m depths, the Oleander project will greatly increase its observational footprint in the northwest Atlantic. All data will be available to the public as soon as they are processed and quality-controlled. The expansion of the University of Hawaii UNOLS-wide ADCP data acquisition system, UHDAS to include volunteer observing ships will allow for real time data streams from not only the Oleander, but also other such ADCP-equipped vessels in operation in the North Atlantic.

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