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Berkeley College is a higher education institution founded in 1931, specializing in business and professional studies. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

FRANKLIN LAKES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The DSM Group, a full-service marketing, advertising and public relations agency located in Bergen County, NJ, today announced that it has hired Zinka Ramdedovic as SVP of Partnerships & Operations. Her first day at the Agency will be June 26. Ramdedovic brings with her 12+ years of experience as a media professional in the lifestyle and luxury niches. She is a strong leader who oversaw all accounts at Condé Nast and previously at Vizeum (Dentsu Aegis). As Head of Media Strategy for Condé Nast she worked with such clients as: Toyota, Estée Lauder, L’Oréal, Pepsi, The Clorox Company, American Express, Chase, Seiko, Saks Fifth Avenue, LVMH, David Yurman, Tiffany’s, Apple, Marriott and many more. In her new position, Ramdedovic will be reporting directly to Darren Magarro, President and CEO of The DSM Group. She will be responsible for driving growth, balancing the demands of the Agency and its clients, establishing discipline and routines for a team of approximately 12 and making quick and decisive decisions keeping the best interests of the agency’s clients in the forefront. She will also help develop, manage and improve the daily client-facing activities of The DSM Group’s account management teams. “We couldn't be happier to add someone of Zinka’s caliber and professionalism to our team,” said Darren Magarro, President and CEO of The DSM Group. “Given our exceptional growth (354% since 2012), our sole initiative in 2017 is to continue to recruit top talent at DSM. Zinka provides a level of experience and expertise that will only benefit DSM’s client relationships. This hire solidifies our mission and commitment to setting the gold standard for marketing agencies in New Jersey.” “There couldn't be a better time than now to join The DSM Group,” said Zinka Ramdedovic. “Its creativity, passion and eagerness are not just inspiring, but needed in our marketplace.” “I've always been a team player and am so excited to be part of this team and culture. Taking my expertise in client relations and building on team collaborations and process will help while the agency continues to grow,” she continued. Prior to Condé Nast, Ramdedovic worked at Vizeum/Dentsu Aegis in NYC as the VP, Director, Integrated Publishing as well as Vizeum/Carat and Carat as a Senior Print Buyer. She is a graduate of Berkeley College and lives in Oakland, NJ with her family. The DSM Group has recently received many accolades. The Agency became the first and only platinum HubSpot certified agency partner in NJ, three of its employees (Ryerson Kipp, Jason Diller and Leon Grassi) were inductees for the 2017 Jersey's Best Marketing & Communications Professionals Under 40 award and Darren Magarro was recently a finalist in the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year® 2017 Award in the New Jersey Region. The Agency has also received the SmartCEO Small Business Awards – Sales & Marketing in 2014 as well as the SmartCEO Corporate Culture Awards – New York in 2015. For more information about The DSM Group, please visit its website, www.thedsmgroup.com or call (201) 485-7777. Founded by Darren Magarro in 2007, The DSM Group is a full-service marketing, advertising and public relations agency located in Bergen County, NJ. The firm works closely with clients in the education, health, hospitality, retail, service, financial and legal sectors, offering growth-based marketing, advertising and public relation services with a focus on driving a tangible ROI for its clients.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

PALO ALTO, CA--(Marketwired - May 22, 2017) - Rubrik, the Cloud Data Management Company, announced today that it has received the NorthFace ScoreBoard Award(SM) from Omega Management Group Corp. in recognition of achieving excellence in customer service and support in 2016. Since 2000, the award has been presented annually to companies who, as rated solely by their own customers, exceeded expectations in customer satisfaction during the prior calendar year. Omega is an expert in customer experience management (CEM) strategy, and helps companies boost revenue and profits by consistently exceeding customer expectations for service quality. "The NorthFace ScoreBoard Award recognizes organizations who not only offer exemplary customer service, but who also center their existence on a deep commitment to exceeding customer expectations," said John Alexander Maraganis, president & CEO of Omega. "In 2016, more than 275 projects, many international in scope, were judged from scores of companies based in the U.S. and abroad. The majority of companies are repeat recipients, which shows that, despite the tough economy, implementing a CEM strategy is a reliable, proven way to achieve business success." "We are truly humbled to be recognized for delivering our customers an exceptional support and service experience. Rubrik was founded with the goal to eliminate the complexity of legacy cloud data management solutions and simplify data protection," said Giri Iyer, VP of global customer support and success, Rubrik. "Despite a 700% increase in customers in 2016, Rubrik support has continued to innovate and improve the customer experience across the customer lifecycle. The recognition we've received from Omega Management Group, based on customer feedback, is validation that these efforts are working." "Rubrik is committed to customer success. They strive to not only create products that delight their customers but also to provide 24/7 real-time support and to deliver the best customer experience," said Leonard De Botton, chief information officer, Berkeley College. "When we needed Rubrik, we were impressed by the responsiveness and availability of highly experienced support engineers who relentlessly worked to ensure our solution worked effectively. We have confidence that Rubrik will always have our back." Omega's methodology measures customer satisfaction and loyalty levels on a 5-point scale (or equivalent) four times during the year in such categories as technical support, field service, customer service and account management. NorthFace ScoreBoard Award recipients are companies who, based solely on survey responses from their own customers, achieved a 4.0 or above out of a possible 5.0. "Due to its unique 'customer-only vote' criteria, the NorthFace ScoreBoard Award has been viewed from its inception as the only objective benchmark for excellence in customer service," Maraganis said. "Our research indicates that companies that consistently achieve a 4.0 rating or above, which we call the 'Loyalty Zone,' are succeeding in locking in profitable, long-term customer relationships, and this significantly raises the bar on their competitors." About Rubrik Rubrik has developed the world's first Cloud Data Management platform for data protection, search, analytics, archival and copy data management for hybrid and multi-cloud enterprises. Fortune 500 companies use Rubrik to manage data at scale while realizing data-driven services anytime, anywhere. Rubrik has been named to Gartner's Cool Vendors in Storage Technologies, 2016 and recognized by Forbes as a Next Billion Dollar Startup. For more information, visit https://www.rubrik.com/ and follow @rubrikInc on Twitter. All trademarks, service marks and company names are the property of their respective owners.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Right-wing author Ann Coulter said she will "definitely" speak at University of California, Berkeley despite administrators canceling the event. Right-wing author and commentator Ann Coulter said she would “definitely” speak at the University of California, Berkeley next week even though the university administrators are trying to prevent her from doing so, reports said Wednesday. "Yes, it was officially banned," Coulter said about her appearance at the university on April 27. "But they can't stop me. I'm an American. I have constitutional rights." “I was invited to speak by two groups on campus, so I intend to speak,” she said. Coulter had accepted an invitation from two of the campus groups in the university, the Berkeley College Republicans and BridgeUSA and she was scheduled to deliver a speech about immigration, the topic that was among one of her 12 New York Times best-selling books. "If that's banned, then no conservative can speak," Coulter told  The Hollywood Reporter on Wednesday. "Meanwhile, corrupt banana republic leaders like Vicente Fox have the red carpet rolled out for them on the taxpayer's dime,” she said referring to the former president of Mexico who already spoke at Beverley this week. The university canceled the scheduled speech by the author Wednesday citing security concerns. Berkeley College Republicans, who were sponsoring the speech with support from Young America’s Foundation (YAF), received a letter from the administrators who said that the university had been “unable to find a safe and suitable venue for your planned April 27 event featuring Ann Coulter.” The letter, which was written by Scott Biddy, the vice chancellor, and Stephen Sutton, the vice chancellor for student affairs, said: “it was not possible to assure that the event could be held successfully — or that the safety of Ms. Coulter, the event sponsors, audience and bystanders could be adequately protected.” Coulter told the Hollywood Reporter that the university had certain requirements that the author had to agree to before her appearance on April 27. Coulter said she had agreed to all terms and conditions. "I've acceded to all their silly demands, which they thought would end it. When I said, 'yes, yes, yes,' they canceled anyway. No more clear-cut proof that taxpayer-supported universities will not allow conservative speakers," Coulter said. Berkeley’s sudden decision came amid the rising violence regarding the cancelation of speeches of conservative speakers at the university. In February, they canceled a talk by right-wing firebrand, Milo Yiannopoulos, and a protest against the cancelation grew into a riot . Last weekend a rally in the city grew violent. So, the administrators cited these reasons for the cancelation.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo, Ann Coulter waves to the audience after speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. The University of California, Berkeley says it's preparing for possible violence on campus whether Coulter comes to speak or not. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) -- Ann Coulter said Wednesday that she was forced to cancel her speaking event Thursday at the University of California, Berkeley amid concerns of violence but might still "swing by to say hello" to all her supporters. Police and university officials said they were bracing for possible trouble whether Coulter comes to campus or not, citing intelligence and online chatter by groups threatening to instigate violence. In emails to The Associated Press, Coulter confirmed that her planned speech on illegal immigration, followed by a question-answer session, was canceled. But she remained coy about what she might do instead. "I'm not speaking. But I'm going to be near there, so I might swing by to say hello to my supporters who have flown in from all around the country," Coulter said in an email. "I thought I might stroll around the graveyard of the First Amendment." Officials at UC Berkeley said last week they feared renewed violence on campus if Coulter followed through with plans to speak. They cited "very specific intelligence" of threats that could endanger Coulter and students, as Berkeley becomes a platform for extremist protesters on both sides of the political spectrum. Efforts by the university to cancel or delay the event dealt a blow to Berkeley's image as a bastion of tolerance and free speech. Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks sent a letter to the campus Wednesday saying the university is committed to defending free speech but also to protecting its students. "This is a university, not a battlefield," Dirks said in the letter. "The university has two non-negotiable commitments, one to Free Speech the other to the safety of our campus community." Berkeley's reputation as one of the country's most liberal universities, in one of America's most liberal cities, has made it a flashpoint for the nation's political divisions in the era of Donald Trump. Earlier this month, a bloody brawl broke out in downtown Berkeley at a pro-Trump protest that featured speeches by members of the white nationalist right. They clashed with a group of Trump critics who called themselves anti-fascists. Similar violent clashes also erupted at the same site, a public park, on March 4. In February, violent protesters forced the cancellation of a speech by right-wing writer Milo Yiannopoulos, who like Coulter was invited by campus Republicans. The Berkeley College Republicans and the Young America's Foundation, a conservative group that had helped book Coulter's campus speaking events, both pulled their support Tuesday citing fears of violence. They blamed the university for failing to ensure protection of conservative speakers. "Berkeley College Republicans do not want to endanger people's lives so because of the university's unwillingness to do their job we are forced to cancel the event," Troy Worden, president of the campus Republicans, said Wednesday. Coulter echoed the blame on Twitter: "I'm very sad about Berkeley's cancellation, but my sadness is greater than that. It's a dark day for free speech in America." Capt. Alex Yao of the Berkley campus police force said police presence will be strong Thursday. "You will see a high number of highly visible law enforcement. We're going to have a very, very low tolerance for any violence," he told a news conference. He said Berkeley police had reached out to local and state police forces "to let them know we might be calling for assistance." This story has been corrected to show the president of the Berkeley College Republicans is Troy Worden.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo, Ann Coulter waves to the audience after speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Coulter's planned appearance at the University of California, Berkeley on April 27 has been canceled because of security concerns. UC Berkeley officials say they were unable to find "a safe and suitable" venue for the right-wing provocateur, whom campus Republicans had invited to speak. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — The University of California at Berkeley students who invited Ann Coulter to speak on campus are threatening to sue the university if it doesn't find a proper time and venue for the conservative pundit to speak next week. Harmeet Dhillon, who represents the Berkeley College Republicans, said in letters sent Friday to UC Berkeley's Interim Vice Chancellor Stephen Sutton and chief attorney Christopher Patti that if Coulter is not allowed to give a speech on campus on April 27 she will file a lawsuit in federal court because the university is violating the students' constitutional right to free speech. "It is a sad day indeed when the birthplace of the Free Speech Movement, is morphing before our eyes into the cemetery of free speech on college campuses," wrote Dhillon, a committeewoman to the Republican National Convention for California and former vice chairwoman of the California Republican Party. Berkeley officials on Tuesday informed the Berkeley College Republicans and the nonpartisan BridgeUSA, which organized the Coulter event, that it was being cancelled due to security concerns. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android. The cancellation comes after a series of violent clashes this year on campus and in downtown Berkeley between far-right and far-left protesters who come armed with pepper spray, Molotov cocktails, brass knuckles and soda cans filled with concrete. Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks said that police have "very specific intelligence regarding threats that could pose a grave danger to the speaker," her audience and protesters if the event goes ahead next Thursday. Officials offered an afternoon event on May 2, when they can offer an "appropriate, protectable venue" but Coulter rejected it, saying she is not available that day. She also tweeted, "THERE ARE NO CLASSES AT BERKELEY THE WEEK OF MAY 2." The period is known as Dead Week, when students are studying for final exams. Dhillon said the university offered eight possible venues for the event students had planned to take place between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. but then abruptly cancelled the event. Patti said in a letter to Dhillon that university police and officials have determined neither the group's free speech nor the safety of the university's 36,000 students can be safeguarded on April 27. Coulter has vowed to speak at Berkeley on that date.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Author Ann Coulter who intends to speak at UC Berkeley campus Thursday, despite concerns over her security, is known for her controversial statements on racism and immigration. Ann Coulter, the controversial conservative social and political commentator, is sticking to her guns on speaking on the campus of University of Berkeley, California, on Thursday, even as questions remain on her safety. And she has left it to the university police, demonstrators and counter-protestors to figure out their course of action. The university chancellor, Nicholas Dirks, said last week in a statement that inviting Coulter on the campus sparked new concerns over safety and security. He said a new "protectable" venue would be found for Coulter to speak and rescheduled her speech to the afternoon of May 2 instead of April 27. Dirks said the location will be disclosed once campus officials have finalized the details with the Coulter organization and the two student organizations that invited her, the Berkeley College Republicans and BridgeUSA. Read: What Will Author Ann Coulter Do After University of California, Berkeley, Cancels Speech Over Safety Concerns? Coulter — author of 10 political bestsellers, with titles such as "How To Talk To A Liberal (If You Must)" and "Demonic: How the Liberal is Endangering America" — is known for her controversial views on immigration and racism. Here are five statements from her that have made headlines. 1) “I don’t know America very well if they want to listen to a snarling Muslim lecture them and tell us we’re not allowed to have opinions on important public policy issues unless we had a son die in Iraq." She said this last September about the father of slain soldier Humayun Khan, when he gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention, according to reports. 2) In 2014, Coulter told Fox News: "Instead of arguing about whether we're allowed to describe Muslim terrorists as 'Muslim terrorists' why don't we argue about whether it's a good idea to be letting in so many immigrants who then blow up the Boston Marathon?" 3) “A lot of people are upset when I talk about Mexican child rapes, Muslims clitorectomies, Muslim honor killings…white people don’t do that. America is not used to these types of crimes. We are bringing in cultures where child rape is very common." 4) On public schools: "Most public schools are, at best, nothing but expensive babysitting arrangements, helpfully keeping hoodlums off the street during daylight hours. At worst, they are criminal training labs, where teachers sexually abuse the children between drinking binges and acts of grand larceny." 5) “This is a country created by white people…I am a native because I am a descendant from settlers."


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Political commentator Ann Coulter speaks during the "Politicon" convention in Pasadena, California, U.S. June 25, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon BERKELEY, Calif. (Reuters) - Conservative commentator Ann Coulter said she had scrapped plans to speak on Thursday at the University of California at Berkeley in defiance of campus officials, who had barred her original engagement this week out of concerns about inciting violent protests. Coulter, one America's best-known and most polarizing pundits on the political right, cast blame on conservative student organizers who withdrew their invitation following their dispute with university officials. "There will be no speech," Coulter wrote in an email to Reuters on Wednesday. "I looked over my shoulder and my allies had joined the other team. "I have no sponsor, no lawyer, no court order," she said. "I can't vindicate constitutional rights on my own." Coulter is the second right-wing speaker whose Berkeley appearance was scrubbed over security concerns. In February protesters started fires, broke windows and clashed with police, forcing Milo Yiannopoulos, then a senior editor for the conservative Breitbart News website, to call off his appearance. Coulter said she might still visit Berkeley, long a bastion of liberal student activism, to meet with supporters on Thursday, the day she was originally slated to speak, but would not deliver an address on campus. Social media feeds of militant left-wing and right-wing activists remained abuzz with vows to proceed with the demonstrations and counter-demonstrations that had been expected to accompany a Coulter appearance. Campus officials said they were continuing to brace for unrest they see as likely on Thursday. "Many of the individuals and organizations which planned to protest Ann Coulter's appearance or support it still intend to come to campus," UC Berkeley spokesman Dan Mogulof said. He said the Berkeley College Republicans erred by inviting Coulter without notifying campus officials in advance, as is required of all student groups, and failing to submit to a "security assessment" to determine a suitable time and place for the event. He denied that Coulter was unwelcome because of her political positions. University officials last week rejected the original Coulter date on grounds they lacked a safe campus venue to host her speech on that day, citing the violence by left-wing protesters over Yiannopoulos' scheduled appearance. The university later proposed that Coulter's speech be moved to next Tuesday. Coulter said she could not make it then and accused the school of trying to limit her audience by choosing a date that fell in a study week ahead of final exams. After insisting she would go through with her speech on Thursday, with or without university approval, Coulter changed her mind as support from student organizers collapsed. College Republicans spokesman Naweed Tahmas accused university officials of "refusing to ensure the safety of all students" and thus infringing on free-speech rights, as claimed in a lawsuit that sponsors of the event filed in federal court on Tuesday.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Conservative political commentator and author Ann Coulter lost the backing of the Young America's Foundation for her talk at University of California, Berkeley (AFP Photo/PAUL J. RICHARDS) Los Angeles (AFP) - Conservative firebrand Ann Coulter on Wednesday canceled a planned appearance at the University of California, Berkeley, saying she had lost the backing of the groups that had sponsored her talk. "It's a sad day for free speech," Coulter told the New York Times. The right-wing commentator had insisted she would show up at Berkeley, a famously progressive campus, on Thursday even though the university said it could not provide a suitable venue because of security threats. But Coulter said she was forced to reconsider her decision after the conservative Young America's Foundation and the Berkeley College Republicans, which had sponsored her talk, backed out, accusing the university of creating a "hostile atmosphere." "Everyone who should believe in free speech fought against it or ran away," Coulter told the Times. The controversy over her talk put the spotlight on the San Francisco-area university long heralded as the birthplace of the Free Speech Movement of the 1960s. University officials have insisted that security could not be guaranteed during Coulter's visit, citing threats and recent violent protests. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android. They proposed an alternate date -- rejected by Coulter -- when fewer students would be on campus. She is a conservative firebrand, author, attorney and political commentator. She is famous for blunt attacks on those who don't share her views. Her 2015 tome on immigration was called "¡Adios, America!: The Left's Plan to Turn Our Country Into a Third World Hellhole." Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks underlined in a letter to the campus community on Wednesday that the university was committed to free speech but also to safety. "Sadly and unfortunately, concern for student safety seems to be in short supply in certain quarters," he said. "This is a university, not a battlefield," he added. "We must make every effort to hold events at a time and location that maximizes the chances that First Amendment rights can be successfully exercised and that community members can be protected." In February, a planned speech at the university by a right-wing provocateur and former Breitbart editor, Milo Yiannopoulos, was cancelled following violent protests that caused $100,000 worth of damage to the campus. Violence has also erupted on the streets of the city during recent events that drew opponents and supporters of President Donald Trump. The latest controversy surrounding Coulter's visit has tested Berkeley's legacy as a champion of free speech and elicited criticism from both Democrats and Republicans. Many say the university was being targeted by extremists from the far right and left because of its iconic status. Liberal TV talk-show host Bill Maher said last week the school had turned from being a cradle of free speech into a "cradle of (expletive) babies." Ex-presidential contender Bernie Sanders also waded in, denouncing activists trying to silence Coulter. "Obviously Ann Coulter is outrageous -- to my mind, off the wall," he told the Huffington Post. "But you know, people have a right to give their two cents worth, give a speech, without fear of violence and intimidation." The American Civil Liberties Union said Wednesday the cancellation of her talk marked a setback. "The heckler's veto of Coulter's Berkeley speech is a loss for the 1st Amendment," the rights group tweeted. "We must protect speech on campus, even hateful."


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo, Ann Coulter waves to the audience after speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. The University of California, Berkeley says it's preparing for possible violence on campus whether Coulter comes to speak or not. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on Ann Coulter's appearance at UC Berkeley (all times local): Police at UC Berkeley say they are preparing to deploy a "highly visible" presence of officers on campus, despite the cancellation of Ann Coulter's speech on Thursday. Capt. Alex Yao of the University of California Police Department says authorities have received intelligence that protest groups could turn up throughout the day and into the night. He said Wednesday that police would have a "very, very low tolerance for any violence." He also said that Berkeley campus police have briefed local and state police departments on their concerns of violence and to let them know they might be called on for assistance. Berkeley's reputation as one of the country's most liberal universities, in one of America's most liberal cities, has made it a flashpoint for the nation's political divisions in the era of Donald Trump. The Berkeley College Republicans who had invited Ann Coulter to the University of California, Berkeley confirmed the group canceled her planned speech over safety concerns. Troy Worden, the student group's president, says college Republicans "had to cancel the event out of concern for the safety of students." Worden made the comments Wednesday in a news conference on UC Berkeley's campus. UC Berkeley officials had said they were unable to provide a safe place for Coulter's proposed Thursday event, amid concerns of violent protests. The university had instead offered to let her speak on May 2. Coulters' student backers say the university is biased against conservative speakers and violating her right to free speech. Ann Coulter says that her speaking event at the University of California, Berkeley is "canceled" but she is implying that she might still travel to the city. In an email to The Associated Press, the conservative pundit wrote "Berkeley canceled" when asked to confirm her planned appearance on the campus Thursday. She added, however, "I have my flights, so I thought I might stroll around the graveyard of the First Amendment." Coulter was invited by the campus Republicans to speak at Berkeley. UC Berkeley officials say they are bracing for possible violence on campus whether the conservative pundit comes to speak or not. The University of California, Berkeley says it's preparing for possible violence on campus whether Ann Coulter comes to speak or not. The conservative pundit has hinted she might cancel her planned appearance Thursday amid growing concerns of violence. She told Florida-based radio station 850 WFTL on Wednesday, "I still wanted to do it but I'm running out of options here." Campus spokesman Dan Mogulof said UC Berkeley officials had not heard directly from Coulter on Wednesday. But he said even if she cancels, some groups that support or oppose her could still turn out on campus. He said police were taking necessary steps to protect the campus but he declined to elaborate. Campus Republicans invited Coulter to speak at the campus. They did not immediately respond to requests for comment. This story has been corrected to show the president of the Berkeley College Republicans is Troy Worden.


As Coulter canceled a contentious appearance and in the wake of protests over Milo Yiannopoulos, the far right is using ‘free speech’ as a rallying cry Ann Coulter has canceled a speech that had been planned for Thursday on the University of California’s Berkeley campus after initially claiming she would defy the administration’s request that she hold her event a week later at a secure venue. “There will be no speech,” the rightwing commentator told Reuters in an email, blaming her reversal on conservative groups that had originally said they would sponsor her talk but apparently withdrew their backing. “I looked over my shoulder and my allies had joined the other team,” she added. The cancellation will come as a relief to university officials who had feared Coulter’s determination to appear on campus at a time and place of her choosing would result in violent confrontations. But for a city that just two weeks ago saw violent clashes between attendees of a rally that included white supremacists, Trump loyalists and militia members and counter-protesting anti-fascists, the temporary deescalation of tensions is likely temporary. The college town so deeply liberal that it is referred to as “the people’s republic of Berkeley” is now a favored destination for the far right, resulting in a number of violent encounters on the city’s streets and the University of California’s flagship campus. The table was set for the Coulter controversy in early February, when the Berkeley College Republicans hosted a speech by former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos. Thousands of students turned out to protest against the rightwing provocateur, and the speech was cancelled after a group of masked protesters shot fireworks, threw rocks and set fires around the venue. The cancellation, which the university said was due to safety concerns and not Yiannopoulos’s political views, nevertheless drew cries of outrage over the alleged suppression of free speech on a college campus. Donald Trump tweeted about the affair, including a veiled threat that the public university could lose federal funds. Casting the controversy over Yiannopolous as one of freedom of speech has been a public relations coup for the right. “It has an almost irresistible propagandistic value,” said Larry Rosenthal, the chair of the UC Berkeley Center for Right-Wing Studies, by providing the right an opportunity to “talk about the hypocrisy of liberals with respect to free speech”. Indeed, the Berkeley College Republicans have made the most out of the perceived hypocrisy of the university, which was the birthplace of the campus free speech movement in 1964. The group’s Facebook page features a video about the speech cancellations and protests set to the mournful strains of the Moonlight Sonata, with the caption, “Berkeley Hates Free Speech”. “We are the new free speech movement,” said Naweed Tahmas, a Berkeley political science major and spokesman for the group. His organization filed a lawsuit against the university, arguing that the school’s requirements that the speech be held during daytime and at a certain venue violate the rights to free speech, due process and equal protection under the law. He also complained that the Berkeley police had not been more proactive about the protests at the Yiannopoulos event, saying that when he and others were escorted from the venue, “protesters shouted: ‘Fuck the Berkeley College Republicans’”. “The university should have made more arrests.” Yiannopoulos has seized on the free speech issue as well, declaring that he will return to Berkeley for a “free speech week” and give out a new award named after Mario Savio, one of the key student leaders of the free speech movement. The adoption – or co-optation – of the free speech movement has raised some eyebrows. Daniel Savio, the son of Mario Savio and a composer, called the idea of Yiannopoulos’s award “some kind of sick joke”. Savio argued that while his father would have broadly supported all people’s rights to speak on campus, there are limits when it comes to speech that directly threatens vulnerable people. Yiannopoulos has previously targeted individual transgender students for harassment. Milo Yiannopoulos was the focus of anti-fascist protest when he arrived to speak at the University of California, Berkeley. “Is freedom of speech such an important principle that we can afford to uphold it even when it means sacrificing the safety of some other folks?” Savio said. Robert Cohen, a history professor at New York University who has written several books about the free speech movement, said that he saw the current contretemps as a “free speech hustle”. “The free speech tradition that people made sacrifices to win is really in tatters,” Cohen said. He blamed the devolution on the “short-sighted” reactions of the left and the “opportunistic and cynical game that these rightwingers are playing”. When the university voted to allow political speech on campus in 1964, he said, they also insisted that the administration be allowed to regulate the “time, place and manner” of such activity so as not to interfere with the normal functioning of the university. “If I want to have a rally, I can’t do it in your English class,” Cohen said. “If having an evening talk by a rightwing bigot is going to do $100,000 in property damage and disrupt the university, they have always had the right to say, no, do it during the daytime.” This argument was echoed by Dan Mogulof, a university spokesman, who said that Coulter was “welcome on this campus” but that the college Republicans had not consulted with the administration to find an appropriate date and venue before booking the speaker, making it difficult for them to ensure public safety. In a city with a well-developed anti-fascist activist base, rightwing groups – including militia organizations, the “alt-right”, white nationalists and Trump supporters – appear to have had a realization. In part because of the “antifa” ethos that extreme rightwing movements must be confronted by any means necessary to stop fascism, rightwing groups are nearly guaranteed a confrontation – and headlines. But beyond the violence and beyond the rhetorical struggle for the moral high ground, Rosenthal argued, some extreme rightwing figures were targeting the city because they view streetfighting as a precursor to a radical rightwing revolution, as was seen in the Weimar Republic in pre-Nazi Germany. “The most significant element in the definition of a classic fascist movement is the marriage between an electoral party and a private militia,” Rosenthal said. The Republican party has not definitively distanced itself from the far right, he pointed out, while streetfights can foster the formation of militias. “What Richard Spencer saw in what happened in Berkeley was the germ of the ‘alt-right’ beginning to form both sides of that marriage.” James Anderson, an editor of itsgoingdown.org, an anti-fascist news site, pointed out: “The only thing that does bring these people together is the idea of attacking the left, attacking anarchists, attacking anti-fascists. That’s the one point of unity.” The school at least seems resigned to confronting its role as host as it attempts to stay true to its principles of academic freedom. “We can’t isolate and hermetically seal ourselves off,” Mogulof said. “This is the reality of the world we live in.”

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