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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has published it’s 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs ranking for 2016-2017. An online leader for higher education resources and information, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org compared data from both online and on-campus programs, highlighting the following schools as those receiving top scores: Clarkson College, Valencia College, Weber State University, Idaho State University and Southern Illinois University Carbondale for four-year schools; Pitt Community College, Owensboro Community & Technical College, Somerset Community College, Washtenaw Community College and Chattanooga State Community College for two-year schools. “With higher median pay and job growth projections than many occupations in the U.S., radiology tech programs are a positive choice for college-bound students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Hundreds of radiology tech programs are available around the nation, but this list pinpoints the schools who offer the best combination of affordability, quality and flexibility for aspiring radiology technologists.” In order to qualify for the list, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org requires all schools with a Radiology Technician program to meet several base criteria points. All colleges and universities must be accredited, two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each schools must also offer career placement services to its grads. Each school was ranked and scored by comparing more than a dozen data points, including cost and financial aid reports, student-teacher ratios and more. A full list of the 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs in the U.S. is included below. More details on the specific data and methodology used can be found at the link below, along with specific information on where each school placed in the ranking: Two-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Cape Fear Community College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Denver Cuyahoga Community College East Central College Eastern Maine Community College Galveston College Georgia Northwestern Technical College Guilford Technical Community College Hagerstown Community College Hillsborough Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Lakeland Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Middlesex Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College North Arkansas College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College Owens Community College Owensboro Community and Technical College Pitt Community College Rend Lake College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southcentral Kentucky Community & Technical College Southeast Arkansas College Southeast Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College Southern Union State Community College SUNY Broome Community College Tallahassee Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Washtenaw Community College West Virginia Northern Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Four-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences Bellevue College Bluefield State College Boise State University Briar Cliff University Broward College Clarkson College College of Southern Nevada Concordia University - Wisconsin Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale La Roche College LIU Post Miami Dade College Minot State University Missouri Southern State University Morehead State University Mount Aloysius College Newman University Notre Dame of Maryland University Palm Beach State College Pensacola State College Saint Catharine College Santa Fe College Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Luke's College St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Suffolk University University of Charleston University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Hartford University of Jamestown University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Sioux Falls University of St Francis Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Online higher education and student resource leader Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has published it’s 2016-2017 Best Ultrasounds Technician Programs lists. Ranking the top 50 two- and four-year programs respectively, the following schools received top marks: Tulsa Community College, Hinds Community College, Pitt Community College, Cincinnati State Technical & Community College, Jones County Junior College; Midland College, Allen College, Palm Beach State College, Bellevue College and Misericordia University. Both on-campus and online programs were evaluated. “The job outlook for ultrasound technicians and sonographers is growing much faster than the national average,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Our rankings list the programs that are going the extra mile for students, providing top-quality training that is preparing students to enter the workforce quickly and efficiently.” Ultrasound and Sonography programs were compared nationwide, based on more than a dozen qualitative and quantitative data points. Schools were required to meet specific base criteria to qualify; each must be regionally accredited and hold either two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit standing. Each must also offer career placement services for students after graduation. A complete list of the Community for Accredited Online Schools’ 2016-2017 Best Ultrasound Technician Programs is included below. To learn more details on the data comparison, methodology and each school’s placement visit the following page: Two-year schools recognized for the Best Ultrasound Technician Programs 2016-2017: Alvin Community College Angelina College Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Blackhawk Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Cape Fear Community College Central New Mexico Community College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College College of DuPage Cosumnes River College Del Mar College Delaware Technical Community College - Owens Delaware Technical Community College-Stanton/Wilmington Delgado Community College Delta College El Centro College El Paso Community College Gateway Community College H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg Hillsborough Community College Hinds Community College Johnston Community College Jones County Junior College Lansing Community College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Lurleen B. Wallace Community College Marion Technical College Middlesex Community College Montgomery College New Mexico State University - Dona Ana Owens Community College Pitt Community College Pueblo Community College Red Rocks Community College Santa Barbara City College Southwestern Community College Spokane Community College St. Philip's College State Fair Community College Temple College Triton College Tulsa Community College Tyler Junior College Volunteer State Community College Wallace State Community College - Hanceville Weatherford College Four-year schools recognized for the Best Ultrasound Technician Programs 2016-2017: Allen College Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baker College of Auburn Hills Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences Bellevue College Benedictine University Broward College College of Southern Nevada Columbia Basin College Concordia University - Ann Arbor Concordia University - Wisconsin Ferris State University Fort Hays State University Grand Valley State University Gulf Coast State College Jackson College Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Kettering College Lewis University Lewis-Clark State College Lincoln University Miami Dade College Midland College Misericordia University Mount Aloysius College Newman University Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Oregon Institute of Technology Palm Beach State College Pensacola State College Polk State College Rochester Institute of Technology Rutgers University - New Brunswick Saint Catharine College Santa Fe College Seattle University St Catherine University St. Luke's College Thomas Jefferson University Trocaire College University of Alaska Anchorage University of Charleston University of Kansas University of Missouri - Columbia University of Oklahoma - Health Sciences Center University of Rio Grande Upstate Medical University Valencia College Washburn University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2016, file photo, Curt Freed, left, and his husband Robert Ingersoll, the couple who sued florist Barronelle Stutzman for refusing to provide services for their wedding, smile after a hearing before Washington's Supreme Court in Bellevue, Wash. The Washington Supreme Court on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, has unanimously ruled that Stutzman, broke the state's antidiscrimination law. Stutzman said she was exercising her First Amendment rights, and her lawyers immediately said they would ask the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the decision. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — The Washington Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday that a florist who refused to provide services for a same-sex wedding broke the state's antidiscrimination law, even though she claimed doing so would violate her religious beliefs. A lower court had fined Barronelle Stutzman, a florist in Richland, Washington, for denying service to a gay couple in 2013, and ordered her to pay a $1,000 fine. Stutzman argued that she was exercising her First Amendment rights. But the court held that her floral arrangements do not constitute protected free speech, and that providing flowers to a same-sex wedding would not serve as an endorsement of same-sex marriage. "As Stutzman acknowledged at deposition, providing flowers for a wedding between Muslims would not necessarily constitute an endorsement of Islam, nor would providing flowers for an atheist couple endorse atheism," the opinion said. Stutzman's lawyers immediately said they would ask the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the decision. "It's wrong for the state to force any citizen to support a particular view about marriage or anything else against their will," Stutzman's attorney, Kristen Waggoner, wrote in a statement issued after the ruling. "Freedom of speech and religion aren't subject to the whim of a majority; they are constitutional guarantees." It's one of several lawsuits around the country — including some involving bakers — about whether businesses can refuse to provide services over causes they disagree with, or whether they must serve everyone equally. A Colorado case involving a baker who would not make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple is pending before the U.S. Supreme Court, according to Lambda Legal. In 2014, the court declined to hear an appeal of a case out of New Mexico that went against a photographer who denied a same-sex couple service. Gov. Jay Inslee lauded Thursday's ruling, saying it was "in favor of equality for all Washingtonians." "By ruling that intolerance based on sexual orientation is unlawful, the Court affirmed that Washington state will remain a place where no one can be discriminated against because of who they love," Inslee said in a written statement. Stutzman had previously sold the couple flowers and knew they were gay. However, Stutzman told them that she couldn't provide flowers for their wedding because same-sex marriage was incompatible with her Christian beliefs. Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson and the couple sued her, saying she broke state anti-discrimination and consumer protection laws, and the lower court agreed. The state's nine high court justices upheld that verdict. The court rejected several arguments put forth by Stutzman, including the assertion that since other florists were willing to serve the couple, no harm occurred. "As every other court to address the question has concluded, public accommodations laws do not simply guarantee access to goods or services. Instead, they serve a broader societal purpose: eradicating barriers to the equal treatment of all citizens in the commercial marketplace," the court wrote. "Were we to carve out a patchwork of exceptions for ostensibly justified discrimination, that purpose would be fatally undermined." The case thrust the great-grandmother into the national spotlight and she testified before state lawmakers in Indiana and Kansas. Michael Scott, a Seattle attorney who worked with the American Civil Liberties Union to represent Robert Ingersoll and Curt Freed — the couple denied the flowers — had previously told justices he didn't believe Stutzman's floral creations constituted speech. By providing flowers for a same-sex marriage, he argued, "she's not endorsing same-sex marriage. She's selling what she sells." Ferguson had said the state's argument rested on longstanding principle, and uprooting it would weaken antidiscrimination law. After the arguments in the Supreme Court case last November, at a packed theater at Bellevue College, a large crowd of Stutzman's supporters greeted her outside, chanting her name and waving signs that said "Justice For Barronelle." In a February 2015 ruling, Benton County Superior Court Judge Alexander Ekstrom found that Stutzman's refusal to provide flowers because of sexual orientation violated Washington's anti-discrimination and consumer protection laws. The following month, Ekstrom ordered Stutzman to pay a $1,000 penalty to the state and $1 in costs and fees.


Worthey G.,Washington State University | Tang B.,Washington State University | Serven J.,Bellevue College
Astrophysical Journal | Year: 2014

Spectral data on early-type galaxies are analyzed for chemical abundance with an emphasis on obtaining detailed abundances for the elements O and Si in addition to C, N, Na, Mg, Ca, Fe, and Ba. The abundance trends with velocity dispersion fit preconceptions based upon previous Mg conclusions, namely, that larger galaxies have a higher alpha element to iron peak ratio indicative of a higher ratio of Type II to Type Ia supernova products. The heaviest alpha elements, Ca and Ti, do not participate in this trend, although this fact does not necessarily alter the basic picture given the uncertainties in nucleosynthetic yields. Elements that likely have significant contributions from intermediate-mass stars, namely, C, N, and Ba, also gain ground relative to Fe in massive galaxies at a modest level, with the Ba conclusion uncertain from our data alone. After the velocity dispersion trend is subtracted, [M/H], [N/Fe], [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] probably have cosmic scatter, and no quantity can be shown to not have cosmic scatter. © 2014. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.


Prekeges J.,Bellevue College
Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology | Year: 2012

Breast cancer has long been a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Mammography is the first-line imaging examination used to detect breast cancer; it has high sensitivity but only moderate specificity. The currently used secondary imaging modalities, sonography and MRI, cannot weed out all the falsepositive lesions that mammography identifies as potentially malignant. Further, many patients do not image well on mammography so there is a significant need for alternative imaging methods. Recently, technologies using small-field, pixelated detectors optimized for breast imaging have become available for both single-photon-emitting and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. This article addresses the construction and functionality of several detector types and their application to imaging of the breast. Technical aspects of nuclear breast imaging will be discussed briefly. The article concludes with an assessment of the position of nuclear medicine imaging of the breast within the overall diagnostic scheme for breast cancer detection. © by the Society of Nuclear Medicine, Inc.


Spataro D.,Bellevue College
Journal of Urbanism | Year: 2015

Cultivated by non-professionals, do-it-yourself (DIY) interventions in urban space are gaining serious credibility in the professional design fields. But as these professionals take up the flag of small-scale and social justice-inspired action in design handbooks and art exhibits, what happens to the struggles that informed the tactics? This article presents the DIY urban tactics of Food Not Bombs as a counter case study that problematizes the recent professional attention given to DIY, tactical or spontaneous urbanism. Forged in a struggle against the structural violence of capitalism, and based in the use of public space for community meals, Food Not Bombs challenges de-politicized notions of tactical or DIY urbanism. © 2015 Taylor & Francis


Charney P.,Bellevue College | Peterson S.J.,Rush University Medical Center
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics | Year: 2013

The Nutrition Care Process and Model (NCPM) provides registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs) a framework to recognize, diagnose, and intervene upon nutrition-related health concerns. Within the NCPM, nutrition assessment is essential to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the client's nutrition history. The application of critical thinking skills to nutrition assessment is imperative to ensure appropriate acquisition and interpretation of data. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Career Development Guide, adapted from the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition, illustrates the progression of critical thinking skills as RDNs and DTRs gain knowledge and experience with practice. The Career Development Guide is characterized by the transition through the following stages: novice, beginner, competent, proficient, and advance practice/expert. The foundation of dietetics knowledge is obtained during the novice and beginner stages. Throughout, the primary objective is introduction of the NCPM and nutrition assessment theory via dietetics education and the application of nutrition assessment in supervised practice. Next, RDNs and DTRs transition to the competent stage of practice. During this phase, entry-level knowledge and skill are applied to patient care settings, and critical thinking skills develop as RDNs and DTRs gain experience. Subsequently, RDNs and DTRs move to the proficient stage as the ability to prioritize attention, generalize, apply problem-solving skills to new scenarios, and identify innovative solutions develops. Some RDNs and DTRs may transition to the advance practice/expert stage, during which critical thinking becomes intuitive. Critical thinking skills are essential to ensure diagnostic accuracy; however, more research is needed to further describe progression of critical thinking skills among RDNs and DTRs. © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 585.83K | Year: 2013

The Bellevue College STEM Scholars Network provides support for up to 50 academically talented and financially disadvantaged students through graduation with associate degrees in STEM fields. The STEM disciplines targeted by the STEM Scholars Network include Earth and Space Sciences, Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.

Intellectual Merit: The cohort-building activities, significant involvement of local industry and academic support structures incorporated into the STEM Scholars Network provide a model for other similar institutions to adapt and implement to facilitate graduation of community college STEM majors. The engagement of STEM professionals with faculty and students promotes new understandings of effective teaching and learning strategies, as well as approaches for effective integration of resources from academia and industry.

Broader Impacts: Partnerships with local companies developed and strengthened through this project are adding to the role the college plays to provide talented STEM professionals to the local workforce. Further, by encouraging participation of underrepresented groups, this project increases access to educational and professional pathways for diverse students, including women, students of color and economically disadvantaged students, thereby diversifying the STEM workforce. Dissemination of these important findings to pre-college teachers, college faculty, administrators and industry leaders throughout Washington state and nationally will inform better strategies for broadening the participation of the nations underprivileged populations in STEM fields.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ADVANCED TECH EDUCATION PROG | Award Amount: 509.64K | Year: 2010

This project is creating a healthcare IT technician certificate program along with the preparatory curriculum required for community college implementation. Project partnerships comprise the National Workforce Center for Emerging Technologies (NSF ATE Center) at Bellevue College, and the worlds largest health IT professional association, the Health Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS). No technician level information technology certification now exists in healthcare. The Health IT Specialist certification addresses a serious and widening gap. The need for IT technicians in healthcare is unquestionably increasing, as the government funds electronic medical record adoption. This project defines a domain, assessment of competency within that domain, and curriculum to support attainment. A newly codified career pathway facilitates entry for underserved learners, by establishing a recognized industry credential.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ADVANCED TECH EDUCATION PROG | Award Amount: 548.72K | Year: 2012

Intellectual Merit: The core of this project is a one quarter long, six quarter credits undergraduate laboratory course centered on sequencing the genome of an agriculturally significant bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens. In addition to lectures covering traditional curriculum, students will perform original research (sequence the segments of DNA, trouble shoot, assure the validity of their data, analyze and infer the significance of their results and communicate their data to peers and faculty). The synergistic activity of critiquing current original research articles in the topics covered in lecture connects the research experience to the students theoretical learning and informs student analysis of their own data. Community college partners include Olympic, Clark, Tacoma and Everett Community Colleges. Other partners include the USDA ARS Root Disease Biological Control Research Unit and Washington State University.

Broader Impact: The aim of this project is to enable community colleges throughout the broad Seattle Tacoma region of Washington state to incorporate an authentic research experience within their traditional laboratory curricula. It is based on a highly successful model designed and implemented by the PI at Bellevue Community College and involves a considerable amount of professional development for the faculty involved. The results will be a set of faculty with new disciplinary related skills in genomics, students who have been part of a scholarly project, community colleges with an enhanced curriculum, and important information gathered about an agriculturally important Pseudomonas species.

This project is being jointly funded by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Division of Undergraduate Education as part of their efforts toward Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education

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