Belisle Solution and Nutrition Inc.

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Canada

Belisle Solution and Nutrition Inc.

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Canada
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Neveu C.,McGill University | Baurhoo B.,Belisle Solution and Nutrition Inc. | Mustafa A.,McGill University
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2013

Twenty Holstein cows were used in a Latin square design experiment with a 2×2 factorial arrangement to determine the effects of extruded flaxseed (EF) supplementation with 2 different forage to concentrate ratios on the performance of dairy cows. Extruded flaxseed diets contained 9% (dry matter basis) EF product which consisted of 75% EF and 25% ground alfalfa meal. Four lactating Holsteins cows fitted with rumen fistulae were used to determine the effects of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation. Intakes of dry matter and crude protein were not influenced by dietary treatments. However, neutral detergent fiber intake was greater for the high-forage (8.4kg/d) than the low-forage (7.8kg/d) diet. Milk yield (average 40.2 kg/d) was similar for all dietary treatments. However, cows fed the high-forage diets produced milk with higher fat (3.76vs. 2.97%) and total solids (12.58vs. 11.95%) concentrations, but lower protein (3.19vs. 3.33%) and lactose (4.66vs. 4.72%) contents. Ruminal pH and total volatile fatty acid concentration were not affected by dietary treatments. However, feeding high forage relative to low forage diets increased molar proportion of acetate but decreased that of propionate. Ruminal NH3-N was reduced by feeding high forage relative to low forage diets. Milk fatty acid composition was altered by both forage level and EF supplementation. Feeding diets containing EF or low forage reduced the concentrations of saturated fatty acids and increased those of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Concentrations of poly-unsaturated fatty acids were increased by feeding EF or low-forage diets. Extruded flaxseed supplementation increased milk fat α-linolenic acid content by 100% and conjugated linoleic acid by 54%. It was concluded that differences in animal performance and ruminal fermentation observed in this study were mostly due to differences in forage to concentrate ratio. However, EF supplementation caused most of the differences observed in milk fatty acid composition. © 2013 American Dairy Science Association.


Neveu C.,McGill University | Baurhoo B.,Belisle Solution and Nutrition Inc. | Mustafa A.,McGill University
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2014

Sixteen Holsteins cows were used in a Latin square design experiment to determine the effects of extruded flaxseed (EF) supplementation and grain source (i.e., corn vs. barley) on performance of dairy cows. Extruded flaxseed diets contained 10% [dry matter (DM) basis] of an EF product that consisted of 75% flaxseed and 25% ground alfalfa meal. Four lactating Holsteins cows fitted with rumen fistulas were used to determine the effects of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation. Intakes of DM (23.2 vs. 22.2kg/d), crude protein (4.2 vs. 4.0kg/d), and neutral detergent fiber (8.3 vs. 7.9kg/d) were greater for cows fed EF diets than for cows fed diets without EF. Milk yield and composition were not affected by dietary treatments. However, 4% fat-corrected milk (30.5% vs. 29.6kg/d) and solids-corrected milk (30.7 vs. 29.9kg/d) were increased by EF supplementation. Ruminal pH and total volatile fatty acid concentration were not influenced by EF supplementation. However, feeding barley relative to corn increased molar proportions of acetate and butyrate and decreased that of propionate. Ruminal NH3-N was lower for cows fed barley than for cows fed corn. Milk fatty acid composition was altered by both grain source and EF supplementation. Cows fed EF produced milk with higher polyunsaturated and lower saturated fatty acid concentrations than cows fed diets without EF. Feeding EF or corn increased the milk concentration of C18:0, whereas that of C16:0 was decreased by EF supplementation only. Extruded flaxseed supplementation increased milk fat α-linolenic acid content by 60% and conjugated linoleic acid content by 29%. Feeding corn relative to barley increased milk conjugated linoleic acid by 29% but had no effect on milk α-linolenic concentration. Differences in animal performance and milk fatty acid composition were mainly due to EF supplementation, whereas differences in ruminal fermentation were mostly due to grain source. © 2014 American Dairy Science Association.


Baurhoo B.,Belisle Solution and Nutrition Inc. | Mustafa A.,McGill University
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2014

Twelve Holstein cows were used in a replicated Latin square experiment to determine the effect of adding dried molasses to high-alfalfa silage diets on dairy cow performance. Three isonitrogenous diets were formulated with a 68:32 forage:concentrate ratio, with alfalfa silage as the only forage source. Dietary treatments were a control diet with no added molasses and 3 and 6% dried molasses diets. Three lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used to determine the effects of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation. Dietary treatments had no effect on dry matter (average 23.3kg/d), crude protein (average 4.4kg/d), or neutral detergent fiber (average 7.4kg/d) intake. Milk yield, energy-corrected milk (average 35.4kg/d), and 4% fat-corrected milk (average 33.8kg/d) were not influenced by dietary treatments. Cows fed the control diet produced milk with less milk urea nitrogen concentration than those fed molasses-supplemented diets. Ruminal pH, NH3-N concentration, and total volatile fatty acids were not different among dietary treatments. The molar proportion of acetate linearly increased, whereas the molar proportion of propionate linearly decreased as the level of dried molasses increased. It was concluded that addition of dried molasses to high-alfalfa silage diets at 6% of the diet (dry matter basis) increased milk urea nitrogen but had no effect on animal performance. © 2014 American Dairy Science Association.


Pourabedin M.,University of Sainte-Anne | Xu Z.,Yangzhou University | Baurhoo B.,Belisle Solution and Nutrition Inc | Chevaux E.,Lallemand Animal Nutrition | Zhao X.,University of Sainte-Anne
Canadian Journal of Microbiology | Year: 2014

There is an increasing movement against use of antibiotic growth promoters in animal feed. Prebiotic supplementation is a potential alternative to enhance the host's natural defense through modulation of gut microbiota. In the present study, the effect of mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) and virginiamycin (VIRG) on cecal microbial ecology and intestinal morphology of broiler chickens raised under suboptimal conditions was evaluated. MOS and VIRG induced different bacterial community structures, as revealed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA. The antibiotic treatment reduced cecal microbial diversity while the community equitability increased. A higher bacterial diversity was observed in the cecum of MOS- supplemented birds. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction results indicated that MOS changed the cecal microbiota in favor of the Firmicutes population but not the Bacteroidetes population. No difference was observed in total bacterial counts among treatments. MOS promoted the growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. in the cecum and increased villus height and goblet cell numbers in the ileum and jejunum. These results provide a deeper insight into the microbial ecological changes after supplementation of MOS prebiotic in poultry diets.

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