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Beijing, China

Guo J.,China Institute of Sport Science | Zhang X.,Peking University | Wang L.,Peking University | Guo Y.,China Institute of Sport Science | Xie M.,Beijing Sports University
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Background: There is an increasing concern on cardiometabolic health in young professional athletes at heavy-weight class. Objective: Our cross-sectional survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clustering of metabolic risk factors in a population of young and active professional athletes of strength sports in China. Methods: From July 2006 to December 2008, a total of 131 male and 130 female athletes of strength sports were enrolled. We used two criteria provided by the Chinese Diabetes Society (2004) and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (2002) to define the metabolic syndrome and its individual components, respectively. Results: Regardless of their similar ages (mean: 21 years) and exercise levels, athletes in the heaviest-weight-class with unlimited maximum body weight (UBW) boundaries (mean weight and BMI: 130 kg and 38 kg/m 2 for men, 110 kg and 37 kg/m2 for women) had significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than did those in all other body-weight-class with limited body weight (LBW) boundaries (mean weight and BMI: 105 kg and 32 kg/m2 for men, 70 kg and 26 kg/m2 for women). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using CDS criteria (UBW vs. LBW: 89% vs. 18% for men, 47% vs. 0% for women) and its individual components, including central obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, and impaired fasting glucose, were all significantly higher in athletes at the heaviest weight group with UBW than all other weight groups with LBW. Conclusions: Our study suggests that professional athletes of strength sports at the heaviest-weight-class are at a significant increased risk of cardiometabolic disease compared with those at all other weight categories. The findings support the importance of developing and implementing the strategy of early screening, awareness, and interventions for weight-related health among young athletes. © 2013 Guo et al. Source


Dai B.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Herman D.,University of Virginia | Liu H.,Beijing Sports University | Garrett W.E.,Duke University | Yu B.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Research in Sports Medicine | Year: 2012

Prevention strategies have been developed based on existing knowledge in an attempt to alter neuromuscular control and lower extremity biomechanics in order to reduce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rates. These strategies have included different training programs ranging from injury education to multicomponent training. Many training programs have been demonstrated as resulting in altered lower extremity movement patterns. The effects of current training programs on ACL injury rate, however, are inconsistent. This review was focused on the effects of current ACL injury training programs on neuromuscular risk factors and ACL injury rate. Recommendations were made based on the available evidence for clinicians and coaches to implement ACL injury prevention programs. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source


Dai B.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Herman D.,University of Virginia | Liu H.,Beijing Sports University | Garrett W.E.,Duke University | Yu B.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Research in Sports Medicine | Year: 2012

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common injuries in sports. ACL injuries are not only costly from financial and health services consumption standpoints, but also can have devastating consequences on patients' activity levels and quality of life. Tremendous efforts have been made over the past two decades toward the goal of preventing ACL injuries. A substantial number of studies have been performed to determine the characteristics of ACL injury events, identify risk factors for ACL injury, and develop prevention strategies. The purpose of this review was to objectively summarize the current literature regarding the characteristics of ACL injury, ACL loading mechanisms, and risk factors for injury to provide a comprehensive understanding of the current state of research and how our current level of knowledge may inform clinical practice in this area. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Source


Liu H.,Beijing Sports University | Yu B.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Journal of Sports Sciences | Year: 2012

Phase ratio is a measure of effort distribution in the triple jump. Hop-dominant, balanced, and jump-dominant techniques were three triple jump techniques defined based on phase ratio. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the phase ratio on the performance of the triple jump. Three-dimensional kinematic data of 13 elite male triple jumpers were obtained during a competition. Computer simulations were performed using a biomechanical model of the triple jump to optimise the phase ratio for the longest actual distance using each of the three techniques for a given athlete with altered velocity conversion coefficients. The velocity conversion coefficient affected which technique achieved the longest actual distance. The actual distance obtained using the hop-dominant technique was significantly longer than that obtained using the other two techniques (P = 0.007, P = 0.001) when the velocity coefficient was between 0.35 and 0.55. The actual distance obtained using the jump-dominant technique was significantly longer than that obtained using the other two techniques (P = 0.001, P = 0.002) when the velocity coefficient was between 0.80 and 1.30. No consistent optimum technique across participants and no significant difference in performance among the three techniques were found (P > 0.524) when the velocity coefficient was between 0.60 and 0.75. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Leigh S.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Liu H.,Beijing Sports University | Hubbard M.,University of California at Davis | Yu B.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Journal of Biomechanics | Year: 2010

The purpose of this study was to determine individualized optimal release angles for elite discus throwers. Three-dimensional coordinate data were obtained for at least 10 competitive trials for each subject. Regression relationships between release speed and release angle, and between aerodynamic distance and release angle were determined for each subject. These relationships were linear with subject-specific characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between release speed and release angle may be due to subjects' technical and physical characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between aerodynamic distance and release angle may be due to interactions between the release angle, the angle of attack, and the aerodynamic distance. Optimal release angles were estimated for each subject using the regression relationships and equations of projectile motion. The estimated optimal release angle was different for different subjects, and ranged from 35° to 44°. The results of this study demonstrate that the optimal release angle for discus throwing is thrower-specific. The release angles used by elite discus throwers in competition are not necessarily optimal for all discus throwers, or even themselves. The results of this study provide significant information for understanding the biomechanics of discus throwing techniques. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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