Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics

Beijing, China

Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics

Beijing, China

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Shi R.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Xue J.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | He M.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Chen D.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | And 3 more authors.
Polymer Degradation and Stability | Year: 2014

Nanofiber membranes composed of polycaprolactone (PCL), PCL/metronidazole (MNA), PCL/gelatin/MNA, and PCL/gelatin/MNA/acetic acid (HAC), named P0, P30, PG30, and PGH30, respectively, were fabricated by electrospinning for application in guided tissue/bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) therapies. The architectural features, mechanical properties, hydrophilicity, drug-encapsulation efficiency, drug-release pattern, antimicrobial properties, cell barrier functions, in vitro/vivo degradability and biocompatibility were investigated. All membranes were found to have high tensile strength, which is required for GTR applications. Strong interactions among PCL, gelatin, and MNA resulted in high drug loading efficiency, which was further improved by the incorporation of gelatin and HAC. MNA incorporation gave the membranes good antimicrobial property, while reducing host versus graft reaction, improving the hydrophilicity and accelerating the degradation. Gelatin incorporation considerably improved cytocompatibility, while accelerating the degradation dramatically. Very low quantities (0.1% v/v with respect to polymer solution) of HAC effectively prevented the phase separation of PCL and gelatin, resulting in homogeneous nanofiber, which facilitates stable physical properties. The drug-release profiles of all drug-loading membranes were consistent with the inflammation cycle characteristics. High drug loading and trace amounts of HAC did not cause any adverse reactions, as evidenced by subcutaneous implantation. Both P0 and P30 maintained their cell barrier function in vivo for as long as 24 weeks; PGH30, for 8 weeks; and PG30, for less than 8 weeks. These findings enabled a comprehensive understanding of the influence of different compositions on the structure and performance of the membranes, thereby supporting the design of membranes with superior overall performance for GTR/GBR application. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Shi R.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Zhu A.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Chen D.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Jiang X.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Applied Polymer Science | Year: 2010

A series of starch/PVA (SP) films with the thickness of 0.05-0.1 mm were cast by solvent method. The swelling and degradation behaviors in simulated blood fluid (SBF) and simulated saliva fluid (SSF) within 30 days were investigated. In vitro biocompatibility was also evaluated. Research purpose of this work was to supply basic data for SP films' potential application in guide tissue regeneration (GTR) technology. It took 10-20 min for different samples to reach to their maximum water absorption and 30 min to lever off. The weight loss of all samples decreased rapidly in the first day in both of SBF or SSF, and then it changed slightly in SSF but decreased step by step in SBF. The mechanical properties of the wet SP films were satisfied with the requirement of GTR membrane. No matter in SBF or SSF, although the mechanical properties decreased rapidly in the first day, they changed slightly after that. Cytotoxicity and L929 fibroblasts attachment test proved that the SP film possesses excellent cell affinity. Hemolysis ratios of all samples were less than 5%. All results demonstrated that SP film is a promising candidate in GTR treatment. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Wu Z.,Peking Union Medical College | Min L.,Peking Union Medical College | Chen D.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Hao D.,Peking Union Medical College | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Background: BMI-1 is a member of the polycomb group of genes (PcGs), and it has been implicated in the development and progression of several malignancies, but its role in osteosarcoma remains to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present study, we found that BMI-1 was overexpressed in different types of osteosarcomas. Downregulation of BMI-1 by lentivirus mediated RNA interference (RNAi) significantly impaired cell viability and colony formation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo of osteosarcoma cells. BMI-1 knockdown sensitized cells to cisplatininduced apoptosis through inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, BMI-1-depletion-induced phenotype could be rescued by forced expression of BMI-1 wobble mutant which is resistant to inhibition by the small interfering RNA (siRNA). Conclusions/Significance: These findings suggest a crucial role for BMI-1 in osteosarcoma pathogenesis. © 2011 Wu et al.


Xue J.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Niu Y.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Gong M.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Shi R.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | And 3 more authors.
ACS Nano | Year: 2015

Guided tissue regeneration/guided bone regeneration membranes with sustained drug delivery were developed by electrospinning drug-loaded halloysite clay nanotubes doped into poly(caprolactone)/gelatin microfibers. Use of 20 wt % nanotube content in fiber membranes allowed for 25 wt % metronidazole drug loading in the membrane. Nanotubes with a diameter of 50 nm and a length of 600 nm were aligned within the 400 nm diameter electrospun fibers, resulting in membranes with doubling of tensile strength along the collector rotating direction. The halloysite-doped membranes acted as barriers against cell ingrows and have good biocompatibility. The metronidazole-loaded halloysite nanotubes incorporated in the microfibers allowed for extended release of the drugs over 20 days, compared to 4 days when directly admixed into the microfibers. The sustained release of metronidazole from the membranes prevented the colonization of anaerobic Fusobacteria, while eukaryotic cells could still adhere to and proliferate on the drug-loaded composite membranes. This indicates the potential of halloysite clay nanotubes as drug containers that can be incorporated into electrospun membranes for clinical applications. © 2015 American Chemical Society.


Xue J.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | He M.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Niu Y.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Liu H.,iNong Group Research Center for Animal Medicine | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Pharmaceutics | Year: 2014

Infection is the major reason of GTR/GBR membrane failure in clinical application. In this work, we developed GTR/GBR nanofiber membranes with localized drug delivery function to prevent infection. Metronidazole (MNA), an antibiotic, was successfully incorporated into electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers at different concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt% polymer). To obtain the optimum anti-infection membrane, we systematically investigated the physical-chemical and mechanical properties of the nanofiber membranes with different drug contents. The interaction between PCL and MNA was identified by molecular dynamics simulation. MNA released in a controlled, sustained manner over 2 weeks and the antibacterial activity of the released MNA remained. The incorporation of MNA improved the hydrophilicity and in vitro biodegradation rate of PCL nanofibers. The nanofiber membranes allowed cells to adhere to and proliferate on them and showed excellent barrier function. The membrane loaded with 30% MNA had the best comprehensive properties. Analysis of subcutaneous implants demonstrated that MNA-loaded nanofibers evoked a less severe inflammatory response than pure PCL nanofibers. These results demonstrate the potential of MNA-loaded nanofiber membranes as GTR/GBR membrane with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory function for extensive biomedical applications. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Xue J.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | He M.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Liu H.,iNong Group Research Center for Animal Medicine | Niu Y.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | And 5 more authors.
Biomaterials | Year: 2014

Infection is the major reason for guided tissue regeneration/guided bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) membrane failure in clinical application. In this work, we developed GTR/GBR membranes with localized drug delivery function to prevent infection by electrospinning of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and gelatin blended with metronidazole (MNA). Acetic acid (HAc) was introduced to improve the miscibility of PCL and gelatin to fabricate homogeneous hybrid nanofiber membranes. The effects of the addition of HAc and the MNA content (0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40wt.% of polymer) on the properties of the membranes were investigated. The membranes showed good mechanical properties, appropriate biodegradation rate and barrier function. The controlled and sustained release of MNA from the membranes significantly prevented the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Cells could adhere to and proliferate on the membranes without cytotoxicity until the MNA content reached 30%. Subcutaneous implantation in rabbits for 8 months demonstrated that MNA-loaded membranes evoked a less severe inflammatory response depending on the dose of MNA than bare membranes. The biodegradation time of the membranes was appropriate for tissue regeneration. These results indicated the potential for using MNA-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun membranes as anti-infective GTR/GBR membranes to optimize clinical application of GTR/GBR strategies. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Wu Y.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Shi R.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Chen D.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Zhang L.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Tian W.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics
Journal of Applied Polymer Science | Year: 2012

Modified nano-fumed silica (mn-silica)/poly(glycerol-sebacate-citrate), in which mn-silica loadings varied from 0 to 20 phr, were prepared by in situ polymerization and surface modification. The influence of mn-silica loadings on the structure and properties of the composites was studied. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) photos showed that the mn-silica dispersed well as nano-scale network in the matrix, and exhibited good interfacial bonding with the matrix. The mn-silica filled composites exhibited excellent comprehensive properties relative to the unfilled elastomers. Specially, the tensile strength improved from 0.9 MPa to 5.3 MPa. Results of the in vitro degradation test suggested that mn-silica loading could adjust the degradation rate of the composites in simulated body fluid solution. The MTT colorimetry with L929 cells substantiated that the introduction of mn-silica weakened the cytotoxicity of elastomers and made the composites accepted as qualified biomedical materials. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Xue J.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | He M.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Liang Y.,Beijing University of Chemical Technology | Crawford A.,University of Sheffield | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Materials Chemistry B | Year: 2014

Infection is the major reason for GTR/GBR membrane failure in clinical applications. In this work, we developed GTR/GBR membranes with localized drug delivery function to prevent infection. Hierarchical membranes containing micro- and nano-fibers were fabricated. The effects of the incorporation of gelatin and loading content of metronidazole (MNA) (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt% polymer) on the properties of the electrospun membranes were investigated. The interaction between PCL and MNA was identified by molecular dynamics simulation. MNA was released in a controlled manner, and the antibacterial activity of the released MNA remained. The incorporation of gelatin and MNA improved the hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and in vitro biodegradation rate of PCL nanofibers. The electrospun membranes allowed cells to adhere to and proliferate on them and showed excellent barrier function. The membrane loaded with 30% MNA had the best comprehensive properties. Subcutaneous implantation results demonstrated that MNA-loaded membranes evoked a less severe inflammatory response than pure PCL nanofibers. These results demonstrated the potential of MNA-loaded membranes as GTR/GBR membranes with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory functions for biomedical applications. © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Shen J.,Beijing Jishuitan Hospital | Zhang H.,Beijing Jishuitan Hospital | Lv Y.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Hong L.,Beijing Jishuitan Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery | Year: 2013

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of a newly developed arthroscopic test, termed the lateral gutter drive-through (LGDT) test, to diagnose posterolateral rotational instability (PLRI) of the knee joint. Methods: Between October 2009 and February 2012, 115 consecutive patients were enrolled into this prospective diagnostic study. The dial test was used as the gold standard for diagnostic reference. According to the dial test, the patients were divided into a study group (35 patients) and a control group (80 patients). The LGDT test was performed on all patients during arthroscopic surgery. The sensitivity and specificity of the LGDT test were calculated. Sensitivities were also calculated in subgroups defined by injury patterns and extents of tibial external rotational instability. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of the LGDT test were calculated as 91.4% and 93.8%, respectively. In subgroup analyses the sensitivity of detection for acute PLRI was 90% versus 92% in chronic cases (P =.849). Popliteus femoral "peel-off" lesions were detected with a sensitivity of 100% versus 87.0% in cases of non-peel-off lesions (P =.536). The sensitivity of detecting isolated external rotational instability versus combined instability (rotational and varus) was 90.5% versus 92.8% (P =.805). The sensitivity of the LGDT test was correlated with the extent of tibial external rotational instability (P <.001). Conclusions: This study showed that the LGDT test is a reliable method and can be used for diagnosing PLRI of the knee joint. The highest sensitivity was observed in patients with the femoral peel-off injury pattern. The sensitivity of the LGDT test was correlated with the extent of tibial external rotational instability and was significantly higher in patients with an increase in tibial external rotation by more than 10°. Level of Evidence: Level I, diagnostic study: testing of previously developed criteria in a series of consecutive patients. © 2013 by the Arthroscopy Association of North America.


Wu X.-B.,Beijing Jishuitan Hospital | Wu X.-B.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | Wang J.-Q.,Beijing Jishuitan Hospital | Wang J.-Q.,Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics | And 6 more authors.
Chinese Medical Journal | Year: 2015

Background: Old pelvis fractures are among the most challenging fractures to treat because of their complex anatomy, difficult-to-access surgical sites, and the relatively low incidence of such cases. Proper evaluation and surgical planning are necessary to achieve the pelvic ring symmetry and stable fixation of the fracture. The goal of this study was to assess the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for surgical management of old pelvic fractures. Methods: First, 16 dried human cadaveric pelvises were used to confirm the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models printed based on radiographic data. Next, nine clinical cases between January 2009 and April 2013 were used to evaluate the surgical reconstruction based on the 3D printed models. The pelvic injuries were all type C, and the average time from injury to reconstruction was 11 weeks (range: 8–17 weeks). The workflow consisted of: (1) Printing patient-specific bone models based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans, (2) virtual fracture reduction using the printed 3D anatomic template, (3) virtual fracture fixation using Kirschner wires, and (4) preoperatively measuring the osteotomy and implant position relative to landmarks using the virtually defined deformation. These models aided communication between surgical team members during the procedure. This technique was validated by comparing the preoperative planning to the intraoperative procedure. Results: The accuracy of the 3D printed models was within specification. Production of a model from standard CT DICOM data took 7 hours (range: 6–9 hours). Preoperative planning using the 3D printed models was feasible in all cases. Good correlation was found between the preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up X-ray in all nine cases. The patients were followed for 3–29 months (median: 5 months). The fracture healing time was 9–17 weeks (mean: 10 weeks). No delayed incision healing, wound infection, or nonunions occurred. The results were excellent in two cases, good in five, and poor in two based on the Majeed score. Conclusions: The 3D printing planning technique for pelvic surgery was successfully integrated into a clinical workflow to improve patient-specific preoperative planning by providing a visual and haptic model of the injury and allowing patient-specific adaptation of each osteosynthesis implant to the virtually reduced pelvis. © 2015, Chinese Medical Association. All rights reserved.

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