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Li M.,Beijing University of Technology | Li M.,The Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics | Lu S.,Beijing University of Technology | Lu S.,The Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics | And 8 more authors.
Journal of International Medical Research | Year: 2016

Objective: To explore working memory and the ability to process different emotional stimuli in patients with first-onset and untreated minor (mild or moderate) depression. Methods: Patients with first-onset and previously untreated minor depression, and healthy controls, were enrolled. Using a modified Sternberg working memory paradigm to investigate the combined effects of emotional stimuli with working memory, participants were exposed to experimental stimuli comprising pictures that represented positive, neutral and negative emotions. Working memory ability was measured using reaction time and accuracy, and emotion-processing ability was measured using pupil diameter. Results: Out of 36 participants (18 patients with minor depression and 18 controls), there were no statistically significant between-group differences in response time and accuracy. Positive stimuli evoked changes in pupil diameter that were significantly smaller in patients with minor depression versus controls, but changes in pupil diameter evoked by negative stimuli were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions: Healthy subjects showed a stronger emotional response to positive emotional stimuli than patients with first onset and previously untreated minor depression, but there were no differences in response to negative emotions. There were no statistically significant between-group differences in terms of speed of cognitive response, but this may have been due to the relatively small samples sizes assessed. Studies with larger sample populations are required to further investigate these results. © 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.


Ma X.,Beijing University of Technology | Ma X.,The Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics | Zhang M.,Beijing University of Technology | Zhang M.,The Beijing Key Laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics | And 7 more authors.
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2016

Depressive disorders shows an alpha EEG asymmetry with higher activation in the left anterior brain. This phenomenon might be associated with the strengthened negative activities in the right side of the brain, especially the information related to self-concept. However, it is absent of direct evidence to support the relationship between the alpha EEG asymmetry and self-concept, and it is not clear what the variation of the correlation between the two factors in depressive disorders. To investigate the issues, we collected the resting EEG data with eyeclosed and the self-consciousness level data to compare the relationship between alpha EEG asymmetry and self-concept in depression patients and healthy controls. Results show that both the two groups have strong correlations between the self-consciousness and alpha asymmetry in the brain, but differed in the correlation patterns. Depressions show that self-consciousness is correlated with the more anterior alpha EEG asymmetry in the brain, while the healthy group correlate with the more posterior alpha asymmetry. These results indicate that the impairment of the correlation between self-concept and alpha asymmetry in depressive disorders might be a biomarker of the disease to be considered in future study. © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

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