Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging

Beijing, China

Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging

Beijing, China
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Chen Z.,CAS Institute of Biophysics | Chen Z.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Chen Z.,Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging | Chen Z.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 34 more authors.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging | Year: 2017

Passband balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) fMRI employs the flat portion of the SSFP off-resonance response to obtain microscopic susceptibility changes elicited by changes in blood oxygenation following enhancement in neuronal activity. This technique can reduce geometric distortion and signal dropout while maintaining rapid acquisition and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared with traditional fMRI techniques. In the study, we developed a novel multi-phase passband b-SSFP fMRI technique that can achieve a spatial resolution of a few mm3 and a high temporal sampling rate of 50 ms per slice at 7 Tesla. This technique was further applied for an event-related (ER) fMRI paradigm. As a comparison, gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) with similar spatial resolution and temporal sampling rate was carried out for the same ER-fMRI experiment. Experiments with visual cortex stimulation were carried out at 7 Tesla to demonstrate whether the multi-phase b-SSFP technique and GE-EPI are able to differentiate temporal delays in hemodynamic response function (HRF) separated by 100 ms in stimulus onset. Consistent with ERP results, the upslope of the HRF of both techniques can differentiate 100 ms delay in stimulus onset, with the former showing a lower level of intersubject variability. The present study demonstrated that the multi-phase passband b-SSFP fMRI technique can be applied for resolving neuronal events on the order of 100 ms at ultrahigh magnetic fields. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Yu S.L.,Capital Medical University | Wang R.,Capital Medical University | Wang R.,CAS Institute of Biophysics | Wang R.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 12 more authors.
American Journal of Neuroradiology | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Identifying feeding arteries of intracranial AVMs is very important for preoperative evaluation. DSA remains the reference standard for diagnosis but is invasive. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling in identifying feeding arteries of intracranial AVMs by using DSA as the criterion standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with AVMs were examined with vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling and DSA. Three postlabeling delays (postlabeling delay = 1, 1.3, and 1.6 seconds) were applied in 6 patients, and a single postlabeling delay (1 second) was applied in the remainder. Perfusion-weighted images were decoded into individual vascular territories with standard and relative tagging efficiencies, respectively. The supply fraction of each feeding artery to theAVMwas calculated. The within-subjectANOVAwas applied to compare supply fractions acquired across 3 postlabeling delays. Receiver operating characteristic analysis curves were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling for identifying the feeding arteries of AVMs. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in supply fractions of the 3 major arteries to AVMs acquired with 3 postlabeling delays (P > .05). For vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling with standard labeling efficiencies, the area under the receiver operating characteristic analysis curve was 0.942. The optimal cutoff of the supply fraction for identifying feeding arteries was 15.17%, and the resulting sensitivity and specificity were 84.62% and 93.33%, respectively. For vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling with relative labeling efficiencies, the area under the receiver operating characteristic analysis curve was 0.957. The optimal cutoff of the supply fraction was 11.73%, which yielded an 89.74% sensitivity and 93.33% specificity. CONCLUSIONS: The contribution fraction of each feeding artery of the AVM can be reliably estimated by using vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling. Vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling with either standard or relative labeling efficiencies offers a high level of diagnostic accuracy compared with DSA for identifying feeding arteries.


Liu D.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Liu D.,Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging | Liu D.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Liu D.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 11 more authors.
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine | Year: 2013

Purpose This study aimed to quantitatively investigate two main magnetization transfer effects at low B1: the nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) and amide proton transfer in the human brain at 7 T. Methods The magnetization transfer effects in the human brain were characterized using a four-pool proton model, which consisted of bulk water, macromolecules, an amide group of mobile proteins and peptides, and NOE-related protons resonating upfield. The pool sizes, exchange rates, and relaxation times of these proton pools were investigated quantitatively by fitting, and the net signals of amide proton transfer and NOE were simulated based on the fitted parameters. Results The results showed that the four-pool model fitted the experimental data quite well, and the NOE effects in human brain at 7 T had a broad spectrum distribution. The NOE effects peaked at a B1 of ∼ 1-1.4 μT and were significantly stronger in the white matter than in the gray matter, corresponding to a pool-size ratio ∼ 2:1. As the amide proton transfer effect was relatively small compared with the NOE effects, magnetization transfer asymmetry analysis yielded an NOE-dominated contrast in the healthy human brain in this range of B1. Conclusion These findings are important to identify the source of NOE effects and to quantify amide proton transfer effects in human brain at 7 T. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Zuo Z.,CAS Institute of Biophysics | Zuo Z.,Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging | Wang R.,CAS Institute of Biophysics | Wang R.,Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Motivations of arterial spin labeling (ASL) at ultrahigh magnetic fields include prolonged blood T1 and greater signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, increased B0 and B1 inhomogeneities and increased specific absorption ratio (SAR) challenge practical ASL implementations. In this study, Turbo-FLASH (Fast Low Angle Shot) based pulsed and pseudo-continuous ASL sequences were performed at 7T, by taking advantage of the relatively low SAR and short TE of Turbo-FLASH that minimizes susceptibility artifacts. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the experimental data showed that Turbo-FLASH based ASL yielded approximately 4 times SNR gain at 7T compared to 3T. High quality perfusion images were obtained with an in-plane spatial resolution of 0.85×1.7 mm2. A further functional MRI study of motor cortex activation precisely located the primary motor cortex to the precentral gyrus, with the same high spatial resolution. Finally, functional connectivity between left and right motor cortices as well as supplemental motor area were demonstrated using resting state perfusion images. Turbo-FLASH based ASL is a promising approach for perfusion imaging at 7T, which could provide novel approaches to high spatiotemporal resolution fMRI and to investigate the functional connectivity of brain networks at ultrahigh field. © 2013 Zuo et al.


Wang R.,CAS Institute of Biophysics | Wang R.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Wang R.,Beijing Joint Center for Advanced Brain Imaging | Wang R.,University of California at Los Angeles | And 15 more authors.
European Radiology | Year: 2014

Objectives: To present a multi-delay pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) protocol that offers simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial transit time (ATT), and to study correlations between multi-delay pCASL and CT perfusion in moyamoya disease. Methods: A 4 post-labeling delay (PLD) pCASL protocol was applied on 17 patients with moyamoya disease who also underwent CT perfusion imaging. ATT was estimated using the multi-delay protocol and included in the calculation of CBF. ASL and CT perfusion images were rated for lesion severity/conspicuity. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated across voxels between the two modalities in grey and white matter of each subject respectively and between normalized mean values of ASL and CT perfusion measures in major vascular territories. Results: Significant associations between ASL and CT perfusion were detected using subjective ratings, voxel-wise analysis in grey and white matter and region of interest (ROI)-based analysis of normalized mean perfusion. The correlation between ASL CBF and CT perfusion was improved using the multi-delay pCASL protocol compared to CBF acquired at a single PLD of 2 s (P<0.05). Conclusions: There is a correlation between perfusion data from ASL and CT perfusion imaging in patients with moyamoya disease. Multi-delay ASL can improve CBF quantification, which could be a prognostic imaging biomarker in patients with moyamoya disease. Key Points: • Simultaneous measurements of CBF and ATT can be achieved using multi-delay pCASL. • Multi-delay ASL was compared with CT perfusion in patients with moyamoya disease. • Statistical analyses showed significant associations between multi-delay ASL and CT perfusion. • Multi-delay ASL can improve CBF quantification in moyamoya disease. © 2014 European Society of Radiology.

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