Calgary, Canada
Calgary, Canada

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Schulte F.,Alberta Childrens Hospital | Schulte F.,University of Calgary | Wurz A.,University of Ottawa | Reynolds K.,Alberta Childrens Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2016

Objectives: To examine the discrepancy between survivor-parent and sibling-parent reports of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and the level of agreement (i.e., correlation) between child reports (i.e., survivor and sibling) and parent-proxy reports of HRQL. Methods: Fifty-one families participated. Pediatric cancer survivors (49% male; 6-18 years of age) and one sibling (47% male; 9-18 years of age) completed a measure of their HRQL. As well, one parent (14% male; 27-65 years of age) from each family completed a proxy report of their children's (i.e., survivor and sibling) HRQL. Consensus was determined through discrepancy and agreement scores, between parent-proxy and children's (i.e., survivors and siblings) self-reports of total HRQL, and physical, emotional, social, and school functioning subscales. Results: Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant group differences for total HRQL (F = 6.79, P ≤ 0.01). Repeated-measure ANOVAs of subscale discrepancy scores revealed significant group differences for physical functioning scores (F = 6.39, P < 0.01). A significant interaction was also found for social functioning when age at diagnosis was considered as a covariate (F = 10.30, P < 0.01). Zero-order and intraclass correlation coefficients revealed different levels of agreement between parent and child reports. Specifically, there was poorer agreement between parent-proxy and sibling's self-reports, particularly on social and emotional subscales. Conclusions: Discrepancy and agreement are both important indices to consider when examining consensus between parent-proxy and child self-reports. The findings from this study have important implications for future research and suggest that the impact of cancer on siblings should be further investigated. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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