Bala Ga’er Gaole, China
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Leach C.R.,Behavioral Research Center Atlanta | Chlebowski R.T.,University of California at Los Angeles | Paskett E.,Ohio State University
The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences | Year: 2016

BACKGROUND: Females 80 years and older comprise 22% of the total U.S. survivor population, yet the impact of cancer on the physical well-being of women is this age group has not been well characterized.METHODS: We compared women, 80 years of age and older in the Women's Health Initiative extension 2, who did (n = 2,270) and did not (n = 20,272) have an adjudicated history of cancer during Women's Health Initiative enrollment; analyses focused on women >2-years postcancer diagnosis. The physical functioning subscale of the RAND-36 was the primary outcome. Demographic, health-status, and psychosocial covariates were drawn from Women's Health Initiative assessments. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the effect of cancer history on physical function, with and without adjustment for covariates.RESULTS: In adjusted models, women with a history of cancer reported significantly lower mean physical functioning (56.6, standard error [SE] 0.4) than those without a cancer history (58.0, SE 0.1), p = .002. In these models, younger current age, lower body mass index, increased physical activity, higher self-rated health, increased reported happiness, and the absence of noncancer comorbid conditions were all associated with higher physical functioning in both women with and without a history of cancer.CONCLUSIONS: Women older than 80 years of age with a cancer history have only a moderately lower level of physical function than comparably aged women without a cancer history. Factors associated with higher levels of physical functioning were similar in both groups. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.


PubMed | Behavioral Research Center Atlanta, Ohio State University and University of California at Los Angeles
Type: | Journal: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences | Year: 2016

Females 80 years and older comprise 22% of the total U.S. survivor population, yet the impact of cancer on the physical well-being of women is this age group has not been well characterized.We compared women, 80 years of age and older in the Womens Health Initiative extension 2, who did (n = 2,270) and did not (n = 20,272) have an adjudicated history of cancer during Womens Health Initiative enrollment; analyses focused on women >2-years postcancer diagnosis. The physical functioning subscale of the RAND-36 was the primary outcome. Demographic, health-status, and psychosocial covariates were drawn from Womens Health Initiative assessments. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the effect of cancer history on physical function, with and without adjustment for covariates.In adjusted models, women with a history of cancer reported significantly lower mean physical functioning (56.6, standard error [SE] 0.4) than those without a cancer history (58.0, SE 0.1), p = .002. In these models, younger current age, lower body mass index, increased physical activity, higher self-rated health, increased reported happiness, and the absence of noncancer comorbid conditions were all associated with higher physical functioning in both women with and without a history of cancer.Women older than 80 years of age with a cancer history have only a moderately lower level of physical function than comparably aged women without a cancer history. Factors associated with higher levels of physical functioning were similar in both groups.

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