Bee Research Institute at Dol

Libčice nad Vltavou, Czech Republic

Bee Research Institute at Dol

Libčice nad Vltavou, Czech Republic
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

PubMed | Bee Research Institute at Dol, CNR Institute of Sciences of Food Production, Czech Institute of Organic Chemistry And Biochemistry, Charles University and Crop Research Institute
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2015

We investigated pathogens in the parasitic honeybee mite Varroa destructor using nanoLC-MS/MS (TripleTOF) and 2D-E-MS/MS proteomics approaches supplemented with affinity-chromatography to concentrate trace target proteins. Peptides were detected from the currently uncharacterized Varroa destructor Macula-like virus (VdMLV), the deformed wing virus (DWV)-complex and the acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV). Peptide alignments revealed detection of complete structural DWV-complex block VP2-VP1-VP3, VDV-1 helicase and single-amino-acid substitution A/K/Q in VP1, the ABPV structural block VP1-VP4-VP2-VP3 including uncleaved VP4/VP2, and VdMLV coat protein. Isoforms of viral structural proteins of highest abundance were localized via 2D-E. The presence of all types of capsid/coat proteins of a particular virus suggested the presence of virions in Varroa. Also, matches between the MWs of viral structural proteins on 2D-E and their theoretical MWs indicated that viruses were not digested. The absence/scarce detection of non-structural proteins compared with high-abundance structural proteins suggest that the viruses did not replicate in the mite; hence, virions accumulate in the Varroa gut via hemolymph feeding. Hemolymph feeding also resulted in the detection of a variety of honeybee proteins. The advantages of MS-based proteomics for pathogen detection, false-positive pathogen detection, virus replication, posttranslational modifications, and the presence of honeybee proteins in Varroa are discussed.


Erban T.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | Petrova D.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | Harant K.,Charles University | Jedelsky P.L.,Charles University | And 2 more authors.
Apidologie | Year: 2014

Apis mellifera Linnaeus is a holometabolous insect that undergoes complete metamorphosis in its nonfeeding pupal stage before transitioning to the adult stage. Its pupal stages are classifiable by the unique color pigmentation of its compound eyes and thorax; notably, there is a red-eye stage involving an unpigmented body that has a relatively short duration and is easy to recognize. The aim of the current study was to create a proteomic reference map of the worker red-eye pupa hemolymph. Hemolymph was collected from dorsal vessels using glass capillary tubes and was examined using pI 3-10 two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE; 10 and 14 %) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF protein identification. This experimental approach allowed us to identify 129 different proteins organized into orthologous groups. Overall, the predominant category was post-translational modifications, protein turnover and chaperones (23.3 % of the identified proteins). In addition, we identified proteins in the non-orthologous groups of olfaction (2.3 % of the identified proteins) and storage hexamerins (3.1 % of the identified proteins). Quantitatively, the major protein isoforms that were accurately identified via 10 % 2DE were four forms of storage hexamerin: the 110, 70a, 70b, and 70c forms. The most abundant enzymes identified were short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases with pivotal developmental roles in ecdysteroidogenesis and a sigma class glutathione-S-transferase that most likely serves as a major protectant against the by-products of oxidative stress. Many of the identified proteins are known to be involved in the mechanisms of metamorphosis. All of the identified proteins are useful as markers for future comparative physiological and developmental studies. © 2013 INRA, DIB and Springer-Verlag France.


Kamler M.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Kamler M.,Bee Research Institute at Dol | Nesvorna M.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | Stara J.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Experimental and Applied Acarology | Year: 2016

The parasitic mite Varroadestructor is a major pest of the western honeybee, Apis mellifera. The development of acaricide resistance in Varroa populations is a global issue. Discriminating concentrations of acaricides are widely used to detect pest resistance. Two methods, using either glass vials or paraffin capsules, are used to screen for Varroa resistance to various acaricides. We found the glass vial method to be useless for testing Varroa resistance to acaridices, so we developed a polypropylene vial bioassay. This method was tested on tau-fluvalinate-, acrinathrin-, and amitraz-resistant mite populations from three apiaries in Czechia. Acetone was used as a control and technical grade acaricide compounds diluted in acetone were applied to the polypropylene vials. The solutions were spread on the vial surface by rolling the vial, and were then evaporated. Freshly collected Varroa females were placed in the vials and the mortality of the exposed mites was measured after 24 h. The Varroa populations differed in mortality between the apiaries and the tested compounds. Mites from the Kyvalka site were resistant to acrinathrin, tau-fluvalinate, and amitraz, while mites from the Postrizin site were susceptible to all three acaricides. In Prelovice apiary, the mites were susceptible to acrinathrin and amitraz, but not to tau-fluvalinate. The calculated discriminating concentrations for tau-fluvalinate, acrinathrin, and amitraz were 0.66, 0.26 and 0.19 µg/mL, respectively. These results indicate that polyproplyne vial tests can be used to determine discriminating concentrations for the early detection of acaricide resistant Varroa. Finally, multiple-resistance in Kyvalka may indicate metabolic resistance. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland


Erban T.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | Jedelsky P.L.,Charles University | Titera D.,Bee Research Institute at Dol
Apidologie | Year: 2013

Honeybee (Apis mellifera Linnaeus) colonies in temperate zones produce either summer bees, which have a lifespan of 15 to 48 days, or winter bees, which emerge in late summer and live up to 8 months. Winter bees develop unique physiological conditions characterized by changes in protein composition that appear to be major determinants of honeybee lifespan. We analyzed winter honeybee worker hemolymph using a proteomic approach for the first time. Hemolymph collected from the dorsal vessel of winter honeybees using a glass capillary tube was analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI TOF/TOF protein identification. Overall, 93 spots were assigned significance (P < 0.05). Many identified proteins corresponded well with extended lifespan. Vitellogenin subunits (mainly ∼180 and ∼100 kDa) comprised the major portion of the proteins; however, vitellogenin dominance repressed the signals of the lower-abundance proteins. Future physiological studies related to overwintering bees, including health, immunity, longevity, nutrition, and/or colony losses, can benefit from these results. © 2013 INRA, DIB and Springer-Verlag France.


Hubert J.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | Kamler M.,Bee Research Institute at Dol | Nesvorna M.,Czech Republic Crop Research Institute | Ledvinka O.,Czech Hydrometeorological Institute | And 2 more authors.
Microbial Ecology | Year: 2016

The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major pest of the honeybee Apis mellifera. In a previous study, bacteria were found in the guts of mites collected from winter beehive debris and were identified using Sanger sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes. In this study, community comparison and diversity analyses were performed to examine the microbiota of honeybees and mites at the population level. The microbiota of the mites and honeybees in 26 colonies in seven apiaries in Czechia was studied. Between 10 and 50 Varroa females were collected from the bottom board, and 10 worker bees were removed from the peripheral comb of the same beehive. Both bees and mites were surface sterilized. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the Varroa and honeybee microbiota. The Varroa microbiota was less diverse than was the honeybee microbiota, and the relative abundances of bacterial taxa in the mite and bee microbiota differed. The Varroa mites, but not the honeybees, were found to be inhabited by Diplorickettsia. The relative abundance of Arsenophonus, Morganella, Spiroplasma, Enterococcus, and Pseudomonas was higher in Varroa than in honeybees, and the Diplorickettsia symbiont detected in this study is specific to Varroa mites. The results demonstrated that there are shared bacteria between Varroa and honeybee populations but that these bacteria occur in different relative proportions in the honeybee and mite bacteriomes. These results support the suggestion of bacterial transfer via mites, although only some of the transferred bacteria may be harmful. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Ryba S.,Charles University | Ryba S.,Bee Research Institute at Dol | Titera D.,Bee Research Institute at Dol | Titera D.,Czech University of Life Sciences | And 3 more authors.
Biologia | Year: 2012

Six bee viruses, which occur in Apis mellifera, were monitored in the Czech Republic between 2006 and 2009. Samples of larvae and pupae collected from hives where American foulbrood was detected were screened for bee viruses and in the 125 samples of larvae, there was no confirmed case of a larva infected with both American foulbrood and a bee virus. Of 145 samples infected with the protozoan Nosema apis, there were 23 cases of coinfections with the BQCV virus, 18 with the DWV virus and 11 with the ABPV virus. All coinfections with three or four viruses were also statistically significant apart from the one between ABPV with CBPV and DWV. The PCA ordination diagram indicates that BQCV occurs mainly with Nosema apis and DWV mainly with ABPV. © 2012 © Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien.


Kloucek P.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Smid J.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Flesar J.,Czech University of Life Sciences | Havlik J.,Czech University of Life Sciences | And 4 more authors.
Natural Product Communications | Year: 2012

This work evaluates the in vitro inhibitory activity of 70 essential oils (EOs) in the vapor phase for the control of Chalkbrood disease caused by Ascosphaera apis Maassen ex Claussen (Olive et Spiltoir). Two wild strains isolated from infected honey bee colonies together with one standard collection strain were tested by the microatmosphere method. From 70 EOs, 39 exhibited an antifungal effect against A. apis standard and wild strains. The greatest antifungal action was observed for EO vapors from Armoracia rusticana, followed by Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon flexosus, Origanum vulgare and Allium sativum. An investigation of chemical composition by GC-MS revealed, that the most active EOs contained allyl isothiocyanate, citral, carvacrol and diallyl sulfides as the main constituents. The chemical composition plays a key role, as activities of different EOs from the same botanical species were different according to their composition.


PubMed | Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Bee Research Institute at Dol and Crop Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Microbial ecology | Year: 2016

The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major pest of the honeybee Apis mellifera. In a previous study, bacteria were found in the guts of mites collected from winter beehive debris and were identified using Sanger sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes. In this study, community comparison and diversity analyses were performed to examine the microbiota of honeybees and mites at the population level. The microbiota of the mites and honeybees in 26 colonies in seven apiaries in Czechia was studied. Between 10 and 50 Varroa females were collected from the bottom board, and 10 worker bees were removed from the peripheral comb of the same beehive. Both bees and mites were surface sterilized. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the Varroa and honeybee microbiota. The Varroa microbiota was less diverse than was the honeybee microbiota, and the relative abundances of bacterial taxa in the mite and bee microbiota differed. The Varroa mites, but not the honeybees, were found to be inhabited by Diplorickettsia. The relative abundance of Arsenophonus, Morganella, Spiroplasma, Enterococcus, and Pseudomonas was higher in Varroa than in honeybees, and the Diplorickettsia symbiont detected in this study is specific to Varroa mites. The results demonstrated that there are shared bacteria between Varroa and honeybee populations but that these bacteria occur in different relative proportions in the honeybee and mite bacteriomes. These results support the suggestion of bacterial transfer via mites, although only some of the transferred bacteria may be harmful.


PubMed | Czech University of Life Sciences, Bee Research Institute at Dol and Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Social honey bees, Apis mellifera, host a set of distinct microbiota, which is similar across the continents and various honey bee species. Some of these bacteria, such as lactobacilli, have been linked to immunity and defence against pathogens. Pathogen defence is crucial, particularly in larval stages, as many pathogens affect the brood. However, information on larval microbiota is conflicting. Seven developmental stages and drones were sampled from 3 colonies at each of the 4 geographic locations of A. mellifera carnica, and the samples were maintained separately for analysis. We analysed the variation and abundance of important bacterial groups and taxa in the collected bees. Major bacterial groups were evaluated over the entire life of honey bee individuals, where digestive tracts of same aged bees were sampled in the course of time. The results showed that the microbial tract of 6-day-old 5th instar larvae were nearly equally rich in total microbial counts per total digestive tract weight as foraging bees, showing a high percentage of various lactobacilli (Firmicutes) and Gilliamella apicola (Gammaproteobacteria 1). However, during pupation, microbial counts were significantly reduced but recovered quickly by 6 days post-emergence. Between emergence and day 6, imago reached the highest counts of Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria, which then gradually declined with bee age. Redundancy analysis conducted using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis identified bacterial species that were characteristic of each developmental stage. The results suggest that 3-day 4th instar larvae contain low microbial counts that increase 2-fold by day 6 and then decrease during pupation. Microbial succession of the imago begins soon after emergence. We found that bacterial counts do not show only yearly cycles within a colony, but vary on the individual level. Sampling and pooling adult bees or 6th day larvae may lead to high errors and variability, as both of these stages may be undergoing dynamic succession.


PubMed | Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, Victoria University of Wellington, Bee Research Institute at Dol and Crop Research Institute
Type: | Journal: Microbial ecology | Year: 2016

The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is a globally important species that suffers from a variety of pathogens and parasites. These parasites and pathogens may have sublethal effects on their bee hosts via an array of mechanisms, including through a change in symbiotic bacterial taxa. Our aim was to assess the influence of four globally widespread parasites and pathogens on the honey bee bacteriome. We examined the effects of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, the fungal pathogens Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, and the trypanosome Lotmaria passim. Varroa was detected by acaricidal treatment, Nosema and L. passim by PCR, and the bacteriome using MiSeq 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Overall, the 1,858,850 obtained sequences formed 86 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% dissimilarity. Location, time of year, and degree of infestation by Varroa had significant effects on the composition of the bacteriome of honey bee workers. Based on statistical correlations, we found varroosis more important factor than N. ceranae, N. apis, and L. passim infestation influencing the honey bee bacteriome and contributing to the changes in the composition of the bacterial community in adult bees. At the population level, Varroa appeared to modify 20 OTUs. In the colonies with high Varroa infestation levels (varroosis), the relative abundance of the bacteria Bartonella apis and Lactobacillus apis decreased. In contrast, an increase in relative abundance was observed for several taxa including Lactobacillus helsingborgensis, Lactobacillus mellis, Commensalibacter intestini, and Snodgrassella alvi. The results showed that the normal bacterial community is altered by eukaryotic parasites as well as displaying temporal changes and changes associated with the geographical origin of the beehive.

Loading Bee Research Institute at Dol collaborators
Loading Bee Research Institute at Dol collaborators