Bee Research and Development Center

Hanoi, Vietnam

Bee Research and Development Center

Hanoi, Vietnam
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Beaurepaire A.L.,Martin Luther University of Halle Wittenberg | Truong T.A.,Bee Research and Development Center | Fajardo A.C.,University of the Philippines at Los Baños | Dinh T.Q.,Bee Research and Development Center | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major global threat to the Western honeybee Apis mellifera. This mite was originally a parasite of A. cerana in Asia but managed to spill over into colonies of A. mellifera which had been introduced to this continent for honey production. To date, only two almost clonal types of V. destructor from Korea and Japan have been detected in A. mellifera colonies. However, since both A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies are kept in close proximity throughout Asia, not only new spill overs but also spill backs of highly virulent types may be possible, with unpredictable consequences for both honeybee species. We studied the dispersal and hybridisation potential of Varroa from sympatric colonies of the two hosts in Northern Vietnam and the Philippines using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers. We found a very distinct mtDNA haplotype equally invading both A. mellifera and A. cerana in the Philippines. In contrast, we observed a complete reproductive isolation of various Vietnamese Varroa populations in A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies even if kept in the same apiaries. In light of this variance in host specificity, the adaptation of the mite to its hosts seems to have generated much more genetic diversity than previously recognised and the Varroa species complex may include substantial cryptic speciation. Copyright: © 2015 Beaurepaire et al.


PubMed | Martin Luther University of Halle Wittenberg, University of Pretoria, University of the Philippines at Los Baños and Bee Research and Development Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is a major global threat to the Western honeybee Apis mellifera. This mite was originally a parasite of A. cerana in Asia but managed to spill over into colonies of A. mellifera which had been introduced to this continent for honey production. To date, only two almost clonal types of V. destructor from Korea and Japan have been detected in A. mellifera colonies. However, since both A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies are kept in close proximity throughout Asia, not only new spill overs but also spill backs of highly virulent types may be possible, with unpredictable consequences for both honeybee species. We studied the dispersal and hybridisation potential of Varroa from sympatric colonies of the two hosts in Northern Vietnam and the Philippines using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers. We found a very distinct mtDNA haplotype equally invading both A. mellifera and A. cerana in the Philippines. In contrast, we observed a complete reproductive isolation of various Vietnamese Varroa populations in A. mellifera and A. cerana colonies even if kept in the same apiaries. In light of this variance in host specificity, the adaptation of the mite to its hosts seems to have generated much more genetic diversity than previously recognised and the Varroa species complex may include substantial cryptic speciation.


Forsgren E.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | Wei S.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Guiling D.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | Zhiguang L.,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | And 5 more authors.
Apidologie | Year: 2015

Populations of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana in China and Vietnam were surveyed in order to study possible pathogen spill-over from European to Asian honeybees. This is the first survey of the prevalence of honeybee pathogens in apiaries in Vietnam, including pathogen prevalence in wild A. cerana colonies never in contact with A. mellifera. The bee samples were assayed for eight honeybee viruses: deformed wing virus (DWV); black queen cell virus (BQCV); sac brood virus (SBV); acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV); Kashmir bee virus (KBV); Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV); chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV); and slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV), for two gut parasites (Nosema ssp.) and for the causative agent for European foulbrood (Melissococcus plutonius). The Vietnamese samples were assayed for Acarapis woodi infestation. No clear evidence of unique inter-specific transmission of virus infections between the two honeybee species was found. However, in wild A. cerana colonies, the only virus infection detected was DWV. With findings of IAPV infections in Chinese samples of A. cerana colonies in contact with A. mellifera, inter-specific transmission of IAPV cannot be ruled out. BQCV was the most prevalent virus in managed colonies irrespective of bee species. We did not detect the causative agent of European foulbrood, M. plutonius in wild or isolated colonies of A. cerana in Vietnam or China; however, low incidence of this pathogen was found in the Asian host species when in contact with its European sister species. No evidence for the presence of A. woodi was found in the Vietnamese samples. © 2014, The Author(s).

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