BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver

Canada

BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver

Canada
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Miller S.D.,BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver | Juricic M.,BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver | Hesketh K.,Closing the Gap Health Care Group Barrie | Mclean L.,Sunny Hill Health Center for Children Vancouver | And 5 more authors.
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology | Year: 2017

Aim: To conduct a systematic review and evaluate the quality of evidence for interventions to prevent hip displacement in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A systematic review was performed using American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology. Searches were completed in seven electronic databases. Studies were included if participants had CP and the effectiveness of the intervention was reported using a radiological measure. Results of orthopaedic surgical interventions were excluded. Results: Twenty-four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria (4 botulinum neurotoxin A; 2 botulinum neurotoxin A and bracing; 1 complementary and alternative medicine; 1 intrathecal baclofen; 1 obturator nerve block; 8 positioning; 7 selective dorsal rhizotomy). There was significant variability in treatment dosages, participant characteristics, and duration of follow-up among the studies. Overall, the level of evidence was low. No intervention in this review demonstrated a large treatment effect on hip displacement. Interpretation: The level and quality of evidence for all interventions aimed at slowing or preventing hip displacement is low. There is currently insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of the identified interventions to prevent hip displacement or dislocation in children and young people with CP. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.


Jimenez-Triana C.A.,Hospital Infantil Of Mexico Federico Gomez | Castelan-Martinez O.D.,Hospital Infantil Of Mexico Federico Gomez | Rivas-Ruiz R.,Coordinacion de Investigacion en Salud | Rivas-Ruiz R.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 13 more authors.
Medicine (United States) | Year: 2015

Cisplatin, a major antineoplastic drug used in the treatment of solid tumors, is a known nephrotoxin. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the prevalence and severity of cisplatin nephrotoxicity in 54 children and its impact on height and weight. We recorded the weight, height, serum creatinine, and electrolytes in each cisplatin cycle and after 12 months of treatment. Nephrotoxicity was graded as follows: normal renal function (Grade 0); asymptomatic electrolyte disorders, including an increase in serum creatinine, up to 1.5 times baseline value (Grade 1); need for electrolyte supplementation <3 months and/or increase in serum creatinine 1.5 to 1.9 times from baseline (Grade 2); increase in serum creatinine 2 to 2.9 times from baseline or need for electrolyte supplementation for more than 3 months after treatment completion (Grade 3); and increase in serum creatinine ≥3 times from baseline or renal replacement therapy (Grade 4). Nephrotoxicity was observed in 41 subjects (75.9%). Grade 1 nephrotoxicity was observed in 18 patients (33.3%), Grade 2 in 5 patients (9.2%), and Grade 3 in 18 patients (33.3%). None had Grade 4 nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity patients were younger and received higher cisplatin dose, they also had impairment in longitudinal growth manifested as statistically significant worsening on the height Z Score at 12 months after treatment. We used a multiple logistic regression model using the delta of height Z Score (baseline-12 months) as dependent variable in order to adjust for the main confounder variables such as: germ cell tumor, cisplatin total dose, serum magnesium levels at 12 months, gender, and nephrotoxicity grade. Patients with nephrotoxicity Grade 1 where at higher risk of not growing (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.07-24.3, P=0.04). The cisplatin total dose had a significant negative relationship with magnesium levels at 12 months (Spearman r=-0.527, P=<0.001). © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Alfadhel M.,BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver | Alfadhel M.,King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences | Lillquist Y.P.,BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver | Davis C.,BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver | And 2 more authors.
American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A | Year: 2011

Cobalamin F disease (cblF) is a rare disorder of intracellular cobalamin metabolism resulting in failure to thrive, recurrent stomatitis, skin rash, megaloblastic anemia, hypotonia, seizures, and intellectual disability. Data on long-term outcomes are not available. We report on the outcome of a patient with cblF disease with a frameshift mutation in the LMBRD1 gene after 18 years of intramuscular hydroxycobalamin treatment. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.


PubMed | BC Childrens Hospital Vancouver
Type: Case Reports | Journal: American journal of medical genetics. Part A | Year: 2011

Cobalamin F disease (cblF) is a rare disorder of intracellular cobalamin metabolism resulting in failure to thrive, recurrent stomatitis, skin rash, megaloblastic anemia, hypotonia, seizures, and intellectual disability. Data on long-term outcomes are not available. We report on the outcome of a patient with cblF disease with a frameshift mutation in the LMBRD1 gene after 18 years of intramuscular hydroxycobalamin treatment.

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