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Mack J.K.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Remler H.P.,Bayerisches Haupt und Landgestut Schwaiganger | Senckenberg E.,Bayerisches Haupt und Landgestut Schwaiganger | Kienzle E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Tierarztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Grosstiere - Nutztiere | Year: 2012

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a different energy supply on the development of Warmblood foals with a focus on examining the recommended allowances of the German Society for Nutrition Physiology (6). Material and methods: Two groups of foals received different amounts of concentrates from the 1st until the 6th month of life. With regards to the total energy content, the rations were composed to either comply with the recommendations (6) (group "Norm", n = 15) or to exceed those by approximately 20% (group "Zulage", n = 16). The supply with concentrates of the group "Norm" aimed for a total energy intake of 73 MJ DE/animal/day, the intake of the group "Zulage" of 87 MJ DE/animal/day. Both groups were provided with the same amount of foal starter feed, but different amounts of oats. Both groups were supplied with 1.0, 1.2, 2.0, 2.0 and 2.35 kg foal starter feed per animal and day from the 2nd until the 6th month of life. Additionally, 0.6, 0.7, 0.5, 0.8 and 0.45 kg oats per animal and day (group "Norm") and 1.8, 2.0, 1.75, 2.0 and 1.75 kg (group "Zulage") were offered during months 2 to 6. The animals were fed twice daily. The roughage consisted of a late first cut of haylage. The animals were out to pasture for several hours/day. Individual concentrate intake, body mass and body condition score (BCS) as well as several other growth parameters were recorded. The total amount of haylage consumed by all animals was documented. Results: The daily average intake of concentrates lay between 0.4 ("Norm") and 0.5 kg ("Zulage") in the 2nd month and between 2.8 ("Norm") and 3.7 kg ("Zulage") in the 6th month. The groups did not differ in any recorded parameter. The amount of concentrates offered was entirely eaten for the first time at an age of approximately 180 days. Conclusion: The results suggest that the energy requirements of foals are approximately 10-20% lower than the re commendations (6). © Schattauer 2012. Source


Mack J.K.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Remler H.P.,Bayerisches Haupt und Landgestut Schwaiganger | Senckenberg E.,Bayerisches Haupt und Landgestut Schwaiganger | Kienzle E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Tierarztliche Praxis Ausgabe G: Grosstiere - Nutztiere | Year: 2014

Objective: This study investigated the energy requirements of Warmblood foals with a change of the stud at weaning. Material and methods: Nine colts purchased at weaning participated in the study aged approximately 6 months to 1 year. They were transported to the stud by their breeders either having been separated from their dams in their home stable or upon arrival at the stud. The foals were offered a late first cut of haylage, oats and foal starter feed. To ensure individual feeding of concentrates, the foals were tethered twice daily. The total combined haylage intake of all foals per day was recorded. Individual concentrate intake, body weight and body condition score (BCS) were documented at 4-week intervals. Results: The total energy intake was 74 MJ digestible energy (68 MJ metabolisable energy) per animal per day. The foals had been delivered at the stud with a comparably low body weight (285 ± 30 kg) and BCS (4.2 ± 0.4 on a scale from 1 to 9). At the end of the study, aged 319 ± 22 days, they attained an average body weight of 326 ± 24 kg and a BCS of 4.2 ± 0.4. The energy intake of the foals of this study was higher and their body weight development slower than in foals of a parallel study, which were born and raised in the stud and therefore exposed to less stressful weaning conditions. Conclusion and clinical relevance: Foals with a comparatively low body weight and BCS at weaning in combination with further stressors need considerably more energy than foals that undergo less stressful weaning conditions. © Schattauer 2014. Source

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