Entity

Time filter

Source Type

San Francisco, CA, United States

Young A.,Bay Area Air Quality Management District
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2014

Many local and regional climate planning efforts in the San Francisco Bay Area focus on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, however, there is a growing realization that communities must begin responding to the threats of climate change impacts. The Bay Conservation and Development Commission has launched Adapting to Rising Tides- the ART Project- a collaborative planning effort to help San Francisco Bay Area communities adapt to sea level rise and storm event flooding. A discussion on the different elements of regional climate action planning, using the San Francisco Bay Area as a model covers a history of regional climate action and planning in the Bay Area, including efforts at the city, county and regional levels, regional policy collaborations to reduce GHG emissions, and regulatory approaches; future of regional climate action planning, based on the Air District's current efforts to develop a regional climate action strategy; an approach to developing standardized methodologies and tools to facilitate widespread climate action planning among the 23 cities and towns in the County; multi-jurisdictional, collaborative approach to staffing climate protection work among the County's 10 cities; and the ART project that addresses climate impact adaptation through multi-jurisdictional vulnerability assessments and impact mitigation planning. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AWMA's 107th Annual Conference & Exhibition (Long Beach, CA 6/24-27/2014). Source


Tao L.,University of California at Berkeley | Fairley D.,Bay Area Air Quality Management District | Kleeman M.J.,University of California at Davis | Harley R.A.,University of California at Berkeley
Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2013

Ocean-going vessels burning high-sulfur heavy fuel oil are an important source of air pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide and particulate matter. Beginning in July 2009, an emission control area was put into effect at ports and along the California coastline, requiring use of lower sulfur fuels in place of heavy fuel oil in main engines of ships. To assess impacts of the fuel changes on air quality at the Port of Oakland and in the surrounding San Francisco Bay area, we analyzed speciated fine particle concentration data from four urban sites and two more remote sites. Measured changes in concentrations of vanadium, a specific marker for heavy fuel oil combustion, are related to overall changes in aerosol emissions from ships. We found a substantial reduction in vanadium concentrations after the fuel change and a 28-72% decrease in SO2 concentrations, with the SO2 decrease varying depending on proximity to shipping lanes. We estimate that the changes in ship fuel reduced ambient PM2.5 mass concentrations at urban sites in the Bay area by about 3.1 ± 0.6% or 0.28 ± 0.05 μg/m3. The largest contributing factor to lower PM mass concentrations was reductions in particulate sulfate. Absolute sulfate reductions were fairly consistent across sites, whereas trace metal reductions were largest at a monitoring site in West Oakland near the port. © 2013 American Chemical Society. Source


Bostick M.S.,Bay Area Air Quality Management District
Air and Waste Management Association - Greenhouse Gas Strategies in a Changing Climate Conference 2011 | Year: 2011

As the planet continues to warm and the effects of climate change become increasingly real and unequivocal, public pressure to take action is likely to continue to mount, and both the staff and Boards of Directors at many California air districts will be compelled to find new ways to assert their climate protection relevancy. 3 rd party GHG verification remains available as a means to apply an air district's considerable knowledge and skills toward programs that will result in actual reductions. While each eligible District has to decide for itself whether investing in the verification program is in its best interest, it's possible that, in the long term, air districts could assume a dominant role in assuring high quality GHG accountability. Source


Fairley D.,Bay Area Air Quality Management District
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2010

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District has prepared the Bay Area 2010 Clean Air Plan (CAP) to update its current ozone plan as required by the California Health & Safety Code. The District broadened the scope of this effort to maximize reductions in four types of pollutants, i.e., ground-level ozone, particulate matter, air toxics, and greenhouse gases (GHG). In addition to attaining air quality standards, the District identified protecting public health and protecting the climate as key objectives for the 2010 CAP. A discussion covers a multi-pollutant evaluation method to help analyze and compare potential emission control measures on a multi-pollutant basis for the 2010 CAP; negative health impacts and economic costs associated with air pollution, e.g., diesel particulate matter, PM 2.5, NO x, and SO 2, in the Bay Area; effect of pollutants on human health and/or the earth's climate; monetizing the value of total health benefits and GHG reductions for all pollutants that would be reduced by each control measure; how reductions of various pollutants will affect ambient concentrations, population exposures, and health outcomes; and previous health benefit analyses. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 103rd AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 6/22-25/2010). Source


Burch D.B.,Bay Area Air Quality Management District
Air and Waste Management Association - Greenhouse Gas Strategies in a Changing Climate Conference 2011 | Year: 2011

The Bay Area 2010 Clean Air Plan represents the BAAQMD's initial effort to develop a multi-pollutant plan. Innovative aspects of 2010 Plan include: • A broad multi-pollutant scope, including an integrated control strategy to reduce ozone, PM2.5, key air toxics, and the "Kyoto Six" greenhouse gases • An emphasis on ultimate outcomes - i.e., protecting public health and protecting the climate - rather than simply attaining ambient air quality standards • Development of the multi-pollutant evaluation method (MPEM) to estimate the health and climate protection benefits of control measures, and express those benefits in monetary terms A broad range of stakeholders expressed support for the BAAQMD's decision to develop a multi-pollutant plan, and to focus on protecting public health and protecting the climate. Developing a multi-pollutant plan was a learning experience, and forced BAAQMD staff to grapple with a variety of technical and policy issues. Although the 2010 Plan attempted to break new ground, it was never intended to serve as the final word in multi-pollutant planning. Rather, the 2010 Plan was intended to inform future multi-pollutant planning efforts in the Bay Area, as well as to provide an example that air quality agencies in other regions can build and improve upon. Source

Discover hidden collaborations