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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2007-2.3-1 | Award Amount: 15.47M | Year: 2008

Angiogenesis underlies almost all biological processes of morphogenesis, including those in tissue repair and regeneration. Physiological angiogenesis is controlled by a complex interplay between cells and their environment: the extracellular matrix (ECM) provides signaling via numerous ECM adhesion molecules and growth factors bound to ECM polysaccharide components; and cells locally degrade and remodel the ECM to create pores into which angiogenic endothelial cells migrate. This observation, that physiological angiogenesis proceeds in response to solid-phase cues motivates our approach, namely creating bioactive resorbable materials as scaffolds that contain bound molecular signals to induce physiological angiogenesis in situations of tissue repair and regeneration. In some of our scaffold materials, porosity is inherent by virtue of fabrication, and in others porosity is created by cell-associated proteolysis as it is in physiological angiogenesis. All materials will be designed so as to be injectable or implantable into the human body. In some work, the final injectable/implantable material will comprise only materials and bioactive biomolecular signals, and in other cases it will also comprise cells. Thus, the concept of ANGIOSCAFF is to create materials that are bioresponsive (to environmental signals including pH and redox potential, and to cellular signals such as proteases), that are bioactive (by virtue of bound peptide or recombinant protein adhesion ligands and bound and releasable growth factors), and that are capable of carrying cellular therapeutics. To realize ANGIOSCAFF, we have assembled a team comprising both industrial and academic expert groups in biomaterials design and development, experts in the science and application of angiogenesis, in imaging in animal models, and in applications demanding biomaterials-based, angiogenesis-demanding tissue engineering therapies, including repair of bone, skin, cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle and nerve.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2010.2.3-1 | Award Amount: 8.02M | Year: 2011

The importance of developing novel approaches for bone repair is underscored by the heavy burden on health care costs and patient suffering caused by traumatic, osteoporotic and osteolytic metastatic bone lesions. To address these health challenges, we will develop optimally performing bioinspired biomaterials mimicking the natural physiological processes underlying bone repair. Our overall approach is to produce smart bioactive 3D scaffolds to fit within bone lesions, which we will then inject with functional, genetically-engineered self-solidifying elastin-like polymers with absolute-controlled molecular architecture and sequences containing specific domains for cell attachment, growth factors and calcium phosphate nanoparticles. The resulting bioactive, biodegradable scaffolds, biogels and regenerated bone will be analysed for biomaterial effects on bone growth, healing, foreign body reactions using cutting-edge in vitro assays, BioMEMS technology, in vivo animal models, non-invasive imaging and gene expression profiling for discovery of biomarkers associated with bone repair. Biomaterials will also be tested with biodynamic assays to assess strength, durability, toxicology, sterilisation reaction, eco-toxicology and risk assessment. Our multidisciplinary consortium with its extensive, state-of-the-art expertise consisting of private and public partners, cellular and molecular biologists, immunologists, physicists, bioengineers, and orthopaedic surgeons will tackle serious bone lesions with a comprehensive work plan to develop a prototype, evaluate it in vivo and in vitro, upscale its production and prepare the final material for clinical phase trials and commercialisation of the dual component product. Our ultimate aims are to ensure strong, healthy bone regeneration, reduce pain and suffering and to become a competitor in the biomaterials market of Europe.


Patent
Baxter Innovations GmbH and Baxter International | Date: 2010-03-31

A quaternary ammonium salt of the formula (1), electrolytic solution containing the salt and electrochemical device using the electrolytic solution.^(1) ~ R^(2) are both methyl, and X^(-) is BF_(1)^(-) or N(CF_(3)SO_(2))2^(-).


Gringeri A.,Baxter Innovations GmbH | Ewenstein B.,Baxter Healthcare Corporation | Reininger A.,Baxter Innovations GmbH
Haemophilia | Year: 2014

Joint bleeding is the hallmark of haemophilia. Increasingly, the pain, restricted movement and anxiety provoked by even a single haemarthrosis are concerns for patients, families and treating physicians. The aims of this study were to determine whether the current paradigm for prophylaxis requires a shift in focus from reducing the frequency of bleeding episodes to a goal of zero bleeding and to review and discuss the published data from in vitro and animal experiments and clinical studies in patients with haemophilia that describe the impact of joint bleeding. More than two to three bleeding into the same joint may cause irreversible and progressive structural damage that compromise health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A goal of zero bleeding episodes - or as close to zero as possible - is key to enhancing joint health and HRQoL in children and adults with haemophilia. Achieving this goal requires individualized, outcome-based, multidisciplinary care to maximize prophylactic efficacy without increasing overall health care costs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Jaki T.,Lancaster University | Wolfsegger M.J.,Baxter Innovations GmbH
Statistics in Medicine | Year: 2012

Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies aim to understand the kinetics of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of a drug. Typically, such studies involve measuring the concentration of the drug in the plasma or blood at several time points after drug administration. In studying the PK behaviour, either the non-compartmental approach or alternatively a modelling approach can be utilized. Traditionally, the non-compartmental approach makes minimal assumptions about the data-generating process but requires the data to be collected in a very structured way. Conversely, the modelling approach depends heavily on assumptions about the data-generating process but does not impose a specific data structure. In this paper, we will discuss non-compartmental methods for estimating the area under the concentration versus time curve and other common PK parameters that use minimal assumptions about the data structure making it applicable to a wide range of PK studies. We will evaluate the methods using simulation and give an illustrative example. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Jaki T.,Lancaster University | Wolfsegger M.J.,Baxter Innovations GmbH
Pharmaceutical Statistics | Year: 2011

The study of the pharmacokinetic (PK) behavior of a compound is crucial to understand the absorbtion, distribution, metabolism and elimination of a drug by the body. PK studies involve measuring the concentration of the drug in the plasma or blood at several time points post drug administration. The classic complete data design samples each subject at all predefined time points. Ethical considerations and restrictions in blood volume, however, lead to incomplete data designs being frequently used instead. In serial sampling designs only one sample is taken from each subject, whereas batch designs take samples more than once from each subject, but not at all time points. In this manuscript the R package PK, which enables the computation of various PK parameters in complete and incomplete data designs, is introduced and some examples are given. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Patent
Baxter Innovations GmbH | Date: 2014-03-31

A medium is described for the protein-free and serum-free cultivation of cells, especially mammalian cells, whereby the medium contains a proportion of soy hydrolysate.


Patent
Baxter Innovations GmbH | Date: 2011-08-04

A medium is described for the protein-free and serum-free cultivation of cells, especially mammalian cells, whereby the medium contains a proportion of soy hydrolysate.


Patent
Baxter Innovations GmbH | Date: 2014-04-29

There is disclosed a method of preparing a plasma protein-containing medicament from citrated plasma or from a citrate-containing plasma fraction, the medicament being substantially free from undesired metals, which method comprises the following steps


The invention relates to vWF cleaving entities having a molecular weight of 180 kD, 170 kD, 160 kD, 120 kD or 110 kD and an N-terminal amino acid sequence of AAGGILHLELLV, vWF cleaving complexes and methods for their production.

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