Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Pessoa V.N.K.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | Rodacki M.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro | Negrato C.A.,Baurus Diabetics Association | Zajdenverg L.,Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Journal of Clinical Lipidology | Year: 2016

Background Insulin resistance, a key factor in the pathophysiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), is associated with an atherogenic lipid profile. Lipid metabolism is altered during normal pregnancy, but it is still unknown how the treatment of GDM affects lipoprotein concentrations. Objective To evaluate maternal lipids at GDM diagnosis, after treatment, and in the puerperium and analyze the influence of BMI, insulin requirement, and glycemic control on lipoproteins. Methods In this observational prospective study, total cholesterol (TC), HDL, and triglycerides (TG) were measured, and LDL was calculated at diagnosis (Dx), at 3-6 weeks after GDM treatment initiation (PI, post initiation) and 6-week postpartum (PP). Subgroups analyses were performed according to categories of maternal BMI, insulin requirement, and quality of glucose control. Results TC and TG increased from Dx to PI and decreased in PP (TC: 213.6 mg/dL, 223.9 mg/dL, and 195.5 mg/dL; TG: 181.5 mg/dL, 203.5 mg/dL, and 100.5 mg/dL, at Dx, PI, and PP, respectively; P <.0001). HDL declined in the puerperium (Dx = 60 mg/dL, PI = 60.8 mg/dL, PP = 51.8 mg/dL; P <.0001 for Dx-PP and PI-PP, respectively). Insulin-treated patients showed an increase in LDL from Dx to PP, whereas LDL declined in the diet-only group (12 vs -11.1 mg/dL, P =.010). TC and TG increased from Dx to PI in patients with adequate glycemic control and decreased in the uncontrolled subgroup (TC: 15.5 vs -1.2 mg/dL, P =.041; TG: 29.7 vs -12.5 mg/dL, P =.07). No significant differences in lipids variation were observed according to BMI. Conclusions Insulin requirement and glycemic control status directly affected the variation of lipid profile in women with GDM. © 2016 National Lipid Association.


Negrato C.A.,Baurus Diabetics Association | Montenegro Jr. R.M.,Federal University of Ceara | Von Kostrisch L.M.,University of Sao Paulo | Guedes M.F.,Baurus Diabetics Association | And 2 more authors.
Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia e Metabologia | Year: 2012

Pregnancy affects both maternal and fetal metabolism, and even in non-diabetic women, it exerts a diabetogenic effect. Among pregnant women, 2% to 14% develop gestational diabetes. Pregnancy can also occur in women with preexisting diabetes, which may predispose the fetus to many alterations in organogenesis, restrict growth, and the mother, to some diabetes-related complications, such as retinopathy and nephropathy, or to acceleration of the course of these complications, if they are already present. Women with gestational diabetes generally start their treatment with diet and lifestyle changes; when these changes are not enough for optimal glycemic control, insulin therapy must then be considered. Women with type 2 diabetes using oral hypoglycemic agents are advised to change to insulin therapy. Those with preexisting type 1 diabetes should start intensive glycemic control. As basal insulin analogues have frequently been used off-label in pregnant women, there is a need to evaluate their safety and efficacy. The aim of this review is to report the use of both short- and long-acting insulin analogues during pregnancy and to enable clinicians, obstetricians, and endocrinologists to choose the best insulin treatment for their patients.© ABE&M todos os direitos reservados.


Negrato C.A.,Baurus Diabetics Association | Mattar R.,Federal University of Sao Paulo | Gomes M.B.,State University of Rio de Janeiro
Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome | Year: 2012

Pregnancy affects both the maternal and fetal metabolism and even in nondiabetic women exerts a diabetogenic effect. Among pregnant women, 2 to 17.8% develop gestational diabetes. Pregnancy can also occur in women with preexisting diabetes, that can predispose the fetus to many alterations in organogenesis, growth restriction and the mother to some diabetes-related complications like retinopathy and nephropathy or accelerate the course of these complications if they are already present. Women with gestational diabetes generally start their treatment with diet and lifestyle modification; when these changes fail in keeping an optimal glycemic control, then insulin therapy must be considered. Women with type 2 diabetes in use of oral hypoglycemic agents are advised to change to insulin therapy. Those with preexisting type 1 diabetes must start an intensive glycemic control, preferably before conception. All these procedures are performed aiming to keep glycemic levels normal or near-normal as possible to avoid the occurrence of adverse perinatal outcomes to the mother and to the fetus. The aim of this review is to reinforce the need to improve the knowledge on reproductive health of women with diabetes during gestation and to understand what are the reasons for them failing to attend for prepregnancy care programs, and to understand the underlying mechanisms of adverse fetal and maternal outcomes, which in turn may lead to strategies for its prevention. © 2012 Negrato et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Negrato C.A.,Baurus Diabetics Association | Gomes M.B.,State University of Rio de Janeiro
Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome | Year: 2013

During our phylogenetic evolution we have selected genes, the so called thrifty genes, that can help to maximize the amount of energy stored from every consumed calorie. An imbalance in the amount of stored calories can lead to many diseases. In the early 80's the distinguished English epidemiologist David Barker, formulated a hypothesis suggesting that many events that occur during the intrauterine life and early in infancy can influence the occurrence of many diseases that will develop in adulthood. This theory proposes that under-nutrition and other insult or adverse stimulus in utero and during infancy can permanently change the body's structure, physiology and metabolism. The lasting or lifelong effects of under-nutrition will depend on the period in the development at which it occurs. The clues that led Barker to his conclusions started to be discovered when he was studying the temporal trends in the incidence of ischemic heart disease in England and Wales. Examining data found in The Hertfordshire records, collected in the beginning of the last century, he found that the rates of mortality by ischemic heart disease was much higher in children born in less affluent counties and mostly in those with low birth weight. After his initial findings a myriad of diseases have been found to be linked to low birth weight and under-nutrition in utero and in the neonatal period. These diseases were then nominated adult diseases with fetal origin. Epidemiological studies that led to these findings suggest that in utero and early postnatal life have critical importance for long-term programming of health and disease, opening unique chances for primary prevention of chronic diseases. © 2013 Negrato and Gomes.


Negrato C.A.,Baurus Diabetics Association | Gomes M.B.,State University of Rio de Janeiro
Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome | Year: 2013

Diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder affecting pregnancy. Its prevalence seems to be growing in parallel with the epidemics of overweight and obesity. Recognizing and treating diabetes or any degree of glucose intolerance in pregnancy results in lowering maternal and fetal complications. These patients present higher risk for excessive weight gain, preeclampsia, cesarean sections, a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the future. Infants born to these mothers are at higher risk for macrosomia and birth trauma, and after delivery, these infants have a higher risk of developing hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hyperbilirubinemia, respiratory distress syndrome, polycythemia and subsequent obesity and type 2 diabetes. Despite several international workshops and a lot of research there is still no unique approach to diagnose and treat diabetes in pregnancy. Who, when and how to screen and diagnose diabetes in pregnancy has been debated in the literature for so many decades and this debate seems to be endless. We present the evolution that screening and diagnosing diabetes in pregnancy has had over time. Besides many evidence of the benefits these procedures bring, health care providers still often prefer to use alternate criteria for this purpose. The myriad of maternal and fetal complications that could be avoided with an appropriate and simple screening procedure are ignored. Robust clinical trials such as the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study have shown how harmful can even slightly altered blood glucose levels be, but it has been found a resistance in the adoption of the new criteria proposed after this and other trials by many diabetes organizations. These organizations state that these new criteria would increase the incidence of diabetes in pregnancy, would imply in longer term follow-up of these patients and would pose an economic problem; they also state that alerting too many people in order to benefit a relatively few potential diabetics would arise psychologic ill-effects. We think that health care providers should look for an uniformity in the screening and diagnosing diabetes in pregnancy based on evidence based medicine and not on specialists consensus. © 2013 Negrato and Gomes; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Discover hidden collaborations