Weimar, Germany
Weimar, Germany

The Bauhaus University is a university located in Weimar, Germany and specializes in the artistic and technical fields. Established in 1860 as the Great Ducal Saxon Art School, it gained collegiate status on 3 June 1910. In 1919 the school was renamed Bauhaus by its new director Walter Gropius and it received its present name in 1996. Approximately 4,000 students are enrolled at the university today.Along with the University of Erfurt, the University of Jena and the Ilmenau University of Technology, the Weimar Bauhaus University is one of the four universities in the Free State of Thuringia. In 2010 the Bauhaus University commemorated its 150th anniversary as an art school and college in Weimar. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.9.6 | Award Amount: 2.72M | Year: 2013

We will design and fabricate a distributed biomorphic computing device built and operated by slime mould Physarum polycephalum. A Physarum chip is a network of processing elements made of the slime moulds protoplasmic tubes coated with conductive substances; the network is populated by living slime mould. A living network of protoplasmic tubes acts as an active non-linear transducer of information, while templates of tubes coated with conductor act as fast information channels.\n\nThe Physarum chip will have parallel inputs (optical, chemo- and electro-based) and outputs (electrical and optical). The Physarum chip will solve a wide range of computation tasks, including optimisation on graphs, computational geometry, robot control, logic and arithmetical computing. The slime mould-based implementation is a bio-physical model of future nano-chips based on biomorphic mineralisation.\n\nWe envisage that research and development centred on novel computing substrates, as self-assembled and fault-tolerant fungal networks will lead to a revolution in the bio-electronics and computer industry. Combined with conventional electronic components in a hybrid chip, Physarum networks will radically improve the performance of digital and analog circuits.\n\nTaking into account the enormous and growing interest of research centres and commercial laboratories in the recent experimental implementations of chemical, molecular and biological computers, we can predict that in the next 20-30 years, networks of slime mould mineralised and/or coated with compound substances will become a widespread commodity and a very promising component of novel information processing circuits.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: EeB-01-2014 | Award Amount: 8.10M | Year: 2015

An important target of Europe 2020 is climate change and energy sustainability. To reach the ambitious aims, it is necessary to improve the energy performance of buildings in operation. Embodied energy in materials presents a high percentage of the energy spent in the whole life cycle of a building, so new materials are needed. Therefore we will develop within this project a novel material solution for ultra-efficient solar energy harvesting and heat exchange through an active building envelope. We thereby address the two technical applications of windows and facades, into which we will implement LARGE AREA FLUIDIC WINDOWS (LaWin). LaWin represents the vision of large-area microfluidic windows and facade elements which are based on four types of new materials: low-cost thin and strong cover glasses, microstructured rolled glasses of architectural quality, a glass-glass compound comprising microfluidic channels and a heat storage liquid designed for transparency and/or active functionality in facade and window implementation. LaWin devices will be designed to build on existing platforms and geometries used in triple glazing and facade elements to enable rapid market access and acceptance. Expected impacts: - Reduction of embodied energy and CO2 to 0 for window surfaces after four months of using (possible because of using regenerative energy with windows for climatisation of buildings, high insulation) - Reduction of at least 123 000 t CO2 per year for heating (goal: at least 2% of window furnaces in Europe) - Improving thermal insulation figures for window surfaces by at least 20% - Reduction of total costs-Purchase price is higher, but running costs are really low - Demonstration of at least a 10% reduction of the energy spent during the whole life cycle of a building; - strengthen competitiveness for all project partners - Clear and transparent information to facilitate better decision making - High quality and environmentally friendly alternative for the build


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.93M | Year: 2017

This research brings together the complementary expertise of our consortium members to gain a better understanding of the physics in hydraulic fracturing (HF) with the final goal to optimize HF practices and to assess the environmental risks related to HF. This requires the development and implementation of reliable models for HF, scaled laboratory tests and available on-site data to validate these models. The key expertise in our consortium is on modelling and simulation of HF and all partners involved pursue different computational approaches. However, we have also some partners in our consortium which focus on scaled laboratory tests and one company which can provide on-site data. The choice of the best model for HF still remains an open question and this research promises to quantify uncertainties in each model and finally provide a guideline how to choose the best model with respect to a specific output parameter. The final objective is to employ these models in order to answer some pressing questions related to environmental risks of HF practices, including 1. How does HF interact with the natural fractures that intersect the shale seam? 2. How does the fracture network from a previous stage of HF treatment affect the fracture network evolution in succeeding, adjacent stages? 3. What are the requirements to constrain fractures from propagating to the adjacent layers of confining rock? The exchange and training objectives are to: 4. Enhance the intersectoral and interdisciplinary training of ERs and ESRs in Computational Science, Mining Geotechnics, Geomechanics, Modeling and Simulation 5. Strengthen, quantitatively and qualitatively, the human potential in research and technology in Europe 6. Advance the scientific contribution of women researchers in this area dominated by male 7. Create synergies with other EU projects 8. Enable and support all ESRs/ERs to keep contact with international community in the sense of training and transfer of knowledge


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 4.34M | Year: 2014

This world-leading Centre for Doctoral Training in Bioenergy will focus on delivering the people to realise the potential of biomass to provide secure, affordable and sustainable low carbon energy in the UK and internationally. Sustainably-sourced bioenergy has the potential to make a major contribution to low carbon pathways in the UK and globally, contributing to the UKs goal of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 and the international mitigation target of a maximum 2 degrees Celsius temperature rise. Bioenergy can make a significant contribution to all three energy sectors: electricity, heat and transport, but faces challenges concerning technical performance, cost effectiveness, ensuring that it is sustainably produced and does not adversely impact food security and biodiversity. Bioenergy can also contribute to social and economic development in developing countries, by providing access to modern energy services and creating job opportunities both directly and in the broader economy. Many of the challenges associated with realising the potential of bioenergy have engineering and physical sciences at their core, but transcend traditional discipline boundaries within and beyond engineering. This requires an effective whole systems research training response and given the depth and breadth of the bioenergy challenge, only a CDT will deliver the necessary level of integration. Thus, the graduates from the CDT in Bioenergy will be equipped with the tools and skills to make intelligent and informed, responsible choices about the implementation of bioenergy, and the growing range of social and economic concerns. There is projected to be a large absorptive capacity for trained individuals in bioenergy, far exceeding current supply. A recent report concerning UK job creation in bioenergy sectors concluded that there may be somewhere in the region of 35-50,000 UK jobs in bioenergy by 2020 (NNFCC report for DECC, 2012). This concerned job creation in electricity production, heat, and anaerobic digestion (AD) applications of biomass. The majority of jobs are expected to be technical, primarily in the engineering and construction sectors during the building and operation of new bioenergy facilities. To help develop and realise the potential of this sector, the CDT will build strategically on our research foundation to deliver world-class doctoral training, based around key areas: [1] Feedstocks, pre-processing and safety; [2] Conversion; [3] Utilisation, emissions and impact; [4] Sustainability and Whole systems. Theme 1 will link feedstocks to conversion options, and Themes 2 and 3 include the core underpinning science and engineering research, together with innovation and application. Theme 4 will underpin this with a thorough understanding of the whole energy system including sustainability, social, economic public and political issues, drawing on world-leading research centres at Leeds. The unique training provision proposed, together with the multidisciplinary supervisory team will ensure that students are equipped to become future leaders, and responsible innovators in the bioenergy sector.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.8.2 | Award Amount: 3.70M | Year: 2013

There is ancient rock-art in most European countries and it is more common than cave art, with pictures and geometric shapes cut into rather than painted onto rock. This art exists in open-air surfaces exposed to the weather rather than inside caves. This wealth of Europes cultural heritage is inaccessible, difficult to study but provides profound stories from our ancient past. Valcamonica, in the Lombardy region of northern Italy, has some of the best rock art in the world. These Pitoti (meaning little puppet in the local dialect) are on the UNESCO list of world heritage. Tens of thousands of Pitoti images span a period from about 4000 BC into medieval times. They show hunting, duelling and dancing scenes, as well as Europes first map. However, the evolution of the wonderful Pitoti graphics is omitted from our standard history story. 3D-PITOTI provides the opportunity to set the record straight and give all Europeans a chance to enjoy this, hitherto underestimated, part of their common European heritage. Pitoti are 3-dimensional as they have depth because they are carved into the rock. But this third dimension has never been recorded or studied in detail. 3D-PITOTI will provide the step change needed by researching and developing:\n An affordable and portable multi-scale 3D scanning toolkit for the high resolution acquisition of Pitoti figures and their natural context;\n Intelligent data processing technologies to enrich the scanned 3D data by classification, clustering and retrieval techniques; and\n Interactive 3D visualization and presentation techniques to provide access to the enriched high resolution digital rock-art for scientists, museum visitors, school children and web users.\nThe 3D-PITOTI project will significantly advance the state of the art in rock-art research methodology and will not only take the rock-art to people for the first time but will convey Pitoti knowledge to a much wider audience in interactive and engaging ways.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 909.00K | Year: 2016

EXCHANGE-Risk is an Intersectoral/International Research and Innovation staff exchange scheme between academia and the industry in Europe and North America focusing on mitigating Seismic Risk of buried steel pipeline Networks that are subjected to ground-imposed permanent deformations. It also aims at developing a Decision Support System for the Rapid Pipeline Recovery to minimize the time required for inspection and rehabilitation in case of a major earthquake. EXCHANGE-Risk involves novel hybrid experimental and numerical work of the soil-pileline system at a pipe, pipeline and network level integrated with innovative technologies for rapid pipe inspection. The outcome of the project is a series of well targeted exchanges between the partners (involving more than 30 early stage and experienced researchers) within a well defined framework of innovation that ensures transfer of knowledge between the academia and the industry, Europe and North America as well wide dissemination of the methodologies and tools developed to the engineering community.

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