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— Global Gunshot Detection Systems Market report covers product scope, market overview, opportunities, risk, and driving force. It analyzes the top manufacturers of Gunshot Detection Systems, with sales, revenue, and price in 2016 and 2017. It also display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017. Companies profiled in this research report are Raytheon Company, Thales Group, Battelle Memorial Institute , Rafael, SST, Safran Electronics & Defense, Rheinmetall AG , ELTA Systems Ltd, Acoem Group , Databuoy Corporation, CILAS, Qinetiq North America, Microflown Avisa B.V., Shooter Detection Systems LLC and Safety Dynamics Inc. Access this report at https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-gunshot-detection-systems-market-by-manufacturers-countries-type-and-application-forecast-to-2022 To provide the historical development this report includes global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Gunshot Detection Systems, for each region, from 2012 to 2017 and market analysis by type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2012 to 2017. This report also analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, and Middle East and Africa. Later, this report provides Gunshot Detection Systems Market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2017 to 2022. In addition to above this report includes Gunshot Detection Systems sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, and sum up with research findings and conclusion. Purchase this premium report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/447847 Market Analysis by Regions • North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) • Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) • Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) • South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) • Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa) Inquire about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/447847 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-gunshot-detection-systems-market-by-manufacturers-countries-type-and-application-forecast-to-2022


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A recent scientific paper by a University of Maryland-led international team of distinguished scientists, including five members of the National Academies, argues that there are critical two-way feedbacks missing from current climate models that are used to inform environmental, climate, and economic policies. The most important inadequately-modeled variables are inequality, consumption, and population. In this research, the authors present extensive evidence of the need for a new paradigm of modeling that incorporates the feedbacks that the Earth system has on humans, and propose a framework for future modeling that would serve as a more realistic guide for policy making and sustainable development. The large, interdisciplinary team of 20 coauthors are from a number of universities (University of Maryland, Northeastern University, Columbia University, George Mason University, Johns Hopkins University, and Brown University) and other institutions (Joint Global Change Research Institute, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Institute for Global Environment and Society, Japan’s RIKEN research institute, and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center). The study explains that the Earth System (e.g., atmosphere, ocean, land, and biosphere) provides the Human System (e.g., humans and their production, distribution, and consumption) not only the sources of its inputs (e.g., water, energy, biomass, and materials) but also the sinks (e.g., atmosphere, oceans, rivers, lakes, and lands) that absorb and process its outputs (e.g., emissions, pollution, and other wastes). Titled "Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems", the article describes how the recent rapid growth in resource use, land-use change, emissions, and pollution has made humanity the dominant driver of change in most of the Earth’s natural systems, and how these changes, in turn, have critical feedback effects on humans with costly and serious consequences, including on human health and well-being, economic growth and development, and even human migration and societal conflict. However, the paper argues that these two-way interactions ("bidirectional coupling") are not included in the current models. The Oxford University Press's multidisciplinary journal National Science Review, which published the paper, also highlighted the paper in a separate "Research Highlight", pointing out that "the rate of change of atmospheric concentrations of CO2, CH4, and N2O [the primary greenhouse gases] increased by over 700, 1000, and 300 times (respectively) in the period after the Green Revolution when compared to pre-industrial rates." See attached figure. "Many datasets, for example, the data for the total concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases, show that human population has been a strong driver of the total impact of humans on our planet Earth. This is seen particularly after the two major accelerating regime shifts: Industrial Revolution (~1750) and Green Revolution (~1950)" said Safa Motesharrei, UMD systems scientist and lead author of the paper. "For the most recent time, we show that the total impact has grown on average ~4 percent between 1950 and 2010, with almost equal contributions from population growth (~1.7 percent) and GDP per capita growth (~2.2 percent). This corresponds to a doubling of the total impact every ~17 years. This doubling of the impact is shockingly rapid." "However, these human impacts can only truly be understood within the context of economic inequality,” pointed out political scientist and co-author Jorge Rivas of the Institute for Global Environment and Society. "The average per capita resource use in wealthy countries is 5 to 10 times higher than in developing countries, and the developed countries are responsible for over three quarters of cumulative greenhouse gas emissions from 1850 to 2000." "The disparity is even greater when inequality within countries is included," added University of Maryland geographer and coauthor Klaus Hubacek. "For example, about 50 percent of the world’s people live on less than $3 per day, 75 percent on less than $8.50, and 90 percent on less than $23. One effect of this inequality is that the top 10 percent produce almost as much total carbon emissions as the bottom 90 percent combined." The study explains that increases in economic inequality, consumption per capita, and total population are all driving this rapid growth in human impact, but that the major scientific models of Earth-Human System interaction do not bidirectionally couple Earth System Models with the primary Human System drivers of change such as demographics, inequality, economic growth, and migration. Instead of two-way coupling with these primary human drivers of change, the researchers argue that current models usually use independent, external projections of those drivers. "This lack of two-way coupling makes current models likely to miss critical feedbacks in the combined Earth-Human system", said National Academy of Engineering member and co-author Eugenia Kalnay, a Distinguished University Professor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland. "It would be like trying to predict El Niño with a sophisticated atmospheric model but with the Sea Surface Temperatures taken from external, independent projections by, for example, the United Nations. Without including the real feedbacks, predictions for coupled systems cannot work; the model will get away from reality very quickly," said Kalnay In this new scientific research, the authors present extensive evidence of the need for a new paradigm of modeling that incorporates the feedbacks that the Earth System has on humans, and propose a framework for future modeling that would serve as a more realistic guide for policymaking and sustainable development. "Ignoring this bidirectional coupling of the Earth and Human Systems can lead to missing something important, even decisive, for the fate of our planet and our species," said co-author Mark Cane, G. Unger Vetlesen Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who recently won the Vetlesen Prize for creating the first coupled ocean–atmosphere model with feedbacks that successfully predicted El Niño. "The result of not dynamically modeling these critical Human-Earth System feedbacks would be that the environmental challenges humanity faces may be significantly underestimated. Moreover, there’s no explicit role given to policies and investments to actively shape the course in which the dynamics unfold. Rather, as the models are designed now, any intervention — almost by definition — comes from the outside and is perceived as a cost," said co-author Matthias Ruth, Director and Professor at the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University. "Such modeling, and the mindset that goes with it, leaves no room for creativity in solving some of the most pressing challenges." ''The paper correctly highlights that other human stressors, not only the climate ones, are very important for long-term sustainability, including the need to reduce inequality'', said Carlos Nobre (not a co-author), one of the world’s leading Earth System scientists, who recently won the prestigious Volvo Environment Prize in Sustainability for his role in understanding and protecting the Amazon. ''Social and economic equality empowers societies to engage in sustainable pathways, which includes, by the way, not only the sustainable use of natural resources but also slowing down population growth, to actively diminish the human footprint on the environment.'' Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor and Director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University, who is not a co-author of the paper, commented: "We cannot separate the issues of population growth, resource consumption, the burning of fossil fuels, and climate risk. They are part of a coupled dynamical system, and, as the authors show, this has dire potential consequences for societal collapse. The implications couldn’t be more profound." This work was supported by the University of Maryland Council on the Environment 2014 Seed Grant (1357928). The authors would like to acknowledge the following grants and institutions: SM, KF, and KH: National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC)--US National Science Foundation (NSF) award DBI-1052875; JR: The Institute of Global Environment and Society (IGES); GRA: Laboratory Directed Research and Development award by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is managed by the Battelle Memorial Institute for the US Department of Energy; MAC: Office of Naval Research, research grant MURI N00014-12-1-0911; FMW: NSF award CBET-1541642; VMY: The Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET). "Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems" is available at: https://academic.oup.com/nsr/article/doi/10.1093/nsr/nww081/2669331/Modeling-Sustainability-Population-Inequality and https://doi.org/10.1093/nsr/nww081; or PDF https://academic.oup.com/nsr/article-pdf/3/4/470/10325470/nww081.pdf


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - A new scientific paper by a University of Maryland-led international team of distinguished scientists, including five members of the National Academies, argues that there are critical two-way feedbacks missing from current climate models that are used to inform environmental, climate, and economic policies. The most important inadequately-modeled variables are inequality, consumption, and population. In this research, the authors present extensive evidence of the need for a new paradigm of modeling that incorporates the feedbacks that the Earth System has on humans, and propose a framework for future modeling that would serve as a more realistic guide for policymaking and sustainable development. Twelve of the interdisciplinary team of 20 coauthors are from the University of Maryland, with multiple other universities (Northeastern University, Columbia University, George Mason University, Johns Hopkins University, and Brown University) and other institutions (Joint Global Change Research Institute, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Institute for Global Environment and Society, Japan's RIKEN research institute, and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center) also represented. The study explains that the Earth System (e.g., atmosphere, ocean, land, and biosphere) provides the Human System (e.g., humans and their production, distribution, and consumption) not only the sources of its inputs (e.g., water, energy, biomass, and materials) but also the sinks (e.g., atmosphere, oceans, rivers, lakes, and lands) that absorb and process its outputs (e.g., emissions, pollution, and other wastes). Titled "Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems", the paper describes how the rapid growth in resource use, land-use change, emissions, and pollution has made humanity the dominant driver of change in most of the Earth's natural systems, and how these changes, in turn, have critical feedback effects on humans with costly and serious consequences, including on human health and well-being, economic growth and development, and even human migration and societal conflict. However, the paper argues that these two-way interactions ("bidirectional coupling") are not included in the current models. The Oxford University Press's multidisciplinary journal National Science Review, which published the paper, has highlighted the work in its current issue, pointing out that "the rate of change of atmospheric concentrations of CO2, CH4, and N2O [the primary greenhouse gases] increased by over 700, 1000, and 300 times (respectively) in the period after the Green Revolution when compared to pre-industrial rates." See Figure 1 from the Highlights article, reproduced below. "Many datasets, for example, the data for the total concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases, show that human population has been a strong driver of the total impact of humans on our planet Earth. This is seen particularly after the two major accelerating regime shifts: Industrial Revolution (~1750) and Green Revolution (~1950)" said Safa Motesharrei, UMD systems scientist and lead author of the paper. "For the most recent time, we show that the total impact has grown on average ~4 percent between 1950 and 2010, with almost equal contributions from population growth (~1.7 percent) and GDP per capita growth (~2.2 percent). This corresponds to a doubling of the total impact every ~17 years. This doubling of the impact is shockingly rapid." "However, these human impacts can only truly be understood within the context of economic inequality," pointed out political scientist and co-author Jorge Rivas of the Institute for Global Environment and Society. "The average per capita resource use in wealthy countries is 5 to 10 times higher than in developing countries, and the developed countries are responsible for over three quarters of cumulative greenhouse gas emissions from 1850 to 2000." University of Maryland geographer and co-author Klaus Hubacek added: "The disparity is even greater when inequality within countries is included. For example, about 50 percent of the world's people live on less than $3 per day, 75 percent on less than $8.50, and 90 percent on less than $23. One effect of this inequality is that the top 10 percent produce almost as much total carbon emissions as the bottom 90 percent combined." The study explains that increases in economic inequality, consumption per capita, and total population are all driving this rapid growth in human impact, but that the major scientific models of Earth-Human System interaction do not bidirectionally (interactively) couple Earth System Models with the primary Human System drivers of change such as demographics, inequality, economic growth, and migration. The researchers argue that current models instead generally use independent, external projections of those drivers. "This lack of two-way coupling makes current models likely to miss critical feedbacks in the combined Earth-Human system," said National Academy of Engineering member and co-author Eugenia Kalnay, a Distinguished University Professor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science at the University of Maryland. "It would be like trying to predict El Niño with a sophisticated atmospheric model, but with the Sea Surface Temperatures taken from external, independent projections by, for example, the United Nations," said Kalnay. "Without including the real feedbacks, predictions for coupled systems cannot work; the model will get away from reality very quickly." "Ignoring this bidirectional coupling of the Earth and Human Systems can lead to missing something important, even decisive, for the fate of our planet and our species," said co-author Mark Cane, G. Unger Vetlesen Professor of Earth and Climate Sciences at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who recently won the Vetlesen Prize for creating the first coupled ocean-atmosphere model with feedbacks that successfully predicted El Niño. Co-author Matthias Ruth, Director and Professor at the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University, said: "The result of not dynamically modeling these critical Human-Earth System feedbacks would be that the environmental challenges humanity faces may be significantly underestimated. Moreover, there's no explicit role given to policies and investments to actively shape the course in which the dynamics unfold. Rather, as the models are designed now, any intervention -- almost by definition -- comes from the outside and is perceived as a cost. Such modeling, and the mindset that goes with it, leaves no room for creativity in solving some of the most pressing challenges." "The paper correctly highlights that other human stressors, not only the climate ones, are very important for long-term sustainability, including the need to reduce inequality'', said Carlos Nobre (not a co-author), one of the world's leading Earth System scientists, who recently won the prestigious Volvo Environment Prize in Sustainability for his role in understanding and protecting the Amazon. "Social and economic equality empowers societies to engage in sustainable pathways, which includes, by the way, not only the sustainable use of natural resources but also slowing down population growth, to actively diminish the human footprint on the environment." Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor and Director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University, who was not a co-author of the paper, commented: "We cannot separate the issues of population growth, resource consumption, the burning of fossil fuels, and climate risk. They are part of a coupled dynamical system, and, as the authors show, this has dire potential consequences for societal collapse. The implications couldn't be more profound." This work was supported by the University of Maryland Council on the Environment 2014 Seed Grant (1357928). The authors would like to acknowledge the following grants and institutions: SM, KF, and KH: National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC)--US National Science Foundation (NSF) award DBI-1052875; JR: The Institute of Global Environment and Society (IGES); GRA: Laboratory Directed Research and Development award by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is managed by the Battelle Memorial Institute for the US Department of Energy; MAC: Office of Naval Research, research grant MURI N00014-12-1-0911; FMW: NSF award CBET-1541642; VMY: The Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET). "Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems" is available at: https:/ and https:/ or PDF https:/


SMi Group will return to London with their 6th annual Pharmaceutical Microbiology conference taking place on the 18-19 January 2017. London, United Kingdom, November 26, 2016 --( With water being used within the manufacturing process of pharmaceutical products, it is a necessity to analyse the water to ensure there is no microbial contamination as this could lead to corruption of the end product. Mettler-Toledo Thornton and Public Health England have recently been added to the 2017 agenda to discuss this vital topic. James Cannon, Head of OEM and Markets from Mettler-Toledo Thornton will be providing a session on ‘Real Time Microbial Detection for Pharmaceutical Water Systems’. He will touch upon the current pharmacopeia and regulatory position on adoption and implementation of alternative microbial technology and discuss how the combined technologies of Light Induced Fluorescence and Mie Scattering detect microbial contamination in pharmaceutical water. He will also present a case study on real time microbial detection systems that are installed on WFI and PW systems as well as provide validation guidance for utilization of alternative microbial detection technology. Also discussing pharmaceutical water systems is Bharat Patel, Consultant Microbiologist from Public Health England. Bharat will provide a presentation on ‘Pseudomonas and water: A practical insight from PHE (Public Health England)’. This session will look at: water sources and potential pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination, pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical infections and how to protect the patient. For the full two day programme with all speakers and their topics visit the event website on www.pharma-microbiology.com/prcom Two CPD certified pre-conference workshops will also be hosted alongside the conference by Sanofi and STERIS Corporation and Battelle Memorial Institute. There is currently an early bird offer available; book by 30th of November to save £100 off the conference price. Register at www.pharma-microbiology.com/prcom Pharmaceutical Microbiology 2017 is sponsored by: Lonza, Mettler-Toledo and PMT (GB) For sponsorship packages: Contact Alia Malick on +44 (0)20 7827 6168 or email amalick@smi-online.co.uk For delegate enquiries: Contact Matthew Apps on +44 (0)20 7827 6093 or email mapps@smi-online.co.uk For media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.uk 6th annual Pharmaceutical Microbiology 18-19 January 2017 London, UK Sponsored by: Lonza, Mettler-Toledo and PMT (GB) www.pharma-microbiology.com/prcom Contact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.uk Contact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6093 #smimicrobiology About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk London, United Kingdom, November 26, 2016 --( PR.com )-- In its 6th successive year, Pharmaceutical Microbiology 2017 will bring together MHRA, Paul Ehrilch Institut, Sanofi, Lonza, Steris, Pfizer and many more to explore the topics of contamination and endotoxins, quality assurance and control, environmental monitoring, new mechanisms of detection and the newly added topic of pharmaceutical water systems.With water being used within the manufacturing process of pharmaceutical products, it is a necessity to analyse the water to ensure there is no microbial contamination as this could lead to corruption of the end product. Mettler-Toledo Thornton and Public Health England have recently been added to the 2017 agenda to discuss this vital topic.James Cannon, Head of OEM and Markets from Mettler-Toledo Thornton will be providing a session on ‘Real Time Microbial Detection for Pharmaceutical Water Systems’. He will touch upon the current pharmacopeia and regulatory position on adoption and implementation of alternative microbial technology and discuss how the combined technologies of Light Induced Fluorescence and Mie Scattering detect microbial contamination in pharmaceutical water. He will also present a case study on real time microbial detection systems that are installed on WFI and PW systems as well as provide validation guidance for utilization of alternative microbial detection technology.Also discussing pharmaceutical water systems is Bharat Patel, Consultant Microbiologist from Public Health England. Bharat will provide a presentation on ‘Pseudomonas and water: A practical insight from PHE (Public Health England)’. This session will look at: water sources and potential pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination, pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical infections and how to protect the patient.For the full two day programme with all speakers and their topics visit the event website on www.pharma-microbiology.com/prcomTwo CPD certified pre-conference workshops will also be hosted alongside the conference by Sanofi and STERIS Corporation and Battelle Memorial Institute.There is currently an early bird offer available; book by 30th of November to save £100 off the conference price. Register at www.pharma-microbiology.com/prcomPharmaceutical Microbiology 2017 is sponsored by: Lonza, Mettler-Toledo and PMT (GB)For sponsorship packages: Contact Alia Malick on +44 (0)20 7827 6168 or email amalick@smi-online.co.ukFor delegate enquiries: Contact Matthew Apps on +44 (0)20 7827 6093 or emailmapps@smi-online.co.ukFor media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.uk6th annual Pharmaceutical Microbiology18-19 January 2017London, UKSponsored by: Lonza, Mettler-Toledo and PMT (GB)www.pharma-microbiology.com/prcomContact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.ukContact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6093#smimicrobiologyAbout SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

The agenda has been released and registration is now open for SMi’s Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA show. The seventh in its series, this event will take place in San Diego, on the 8th and 9th June 2017. San Diego, CA, February 16, 2017 --( Through a series of presentations from handpicked industry experts, two pre-conference workshops and an additional interactive training session, the agenda will discuss hot topics such as rapid microbiology methods (RMM), risk assessment, challenges in endotoxin recovery, environmental monitoring, sterility assurance, data integrity and much more. Chairs for 2017: - Donald Singer, GSK Fellow, Steriles Microbiology, R&D, GSK - John Duguid, Senior Director, Research & Development, Vericel Corporation Expert Speaker Line-Up: - Ron Smith, Director, External Supply Integration Quality, Janssen - Ren-Yo Forng, Scientific Director, Amgen - Kevin Luongo, QC Sr. Scientist (Microbiology), Takeda - Elizabeth Hulanick, Microbiologist, Renaissance Pharmaceuticals - Paul Ricciatti, Sterility Assurance Manager, Bimeda - Jeanne Moldenhauer, Vice President, Excellent Pharma Consulting - Akua Gilbert-Arthur, Principal Scientist, Roche Molecular Systems - Jarett Scalzo, QC, Microbiology Manager, Kite Pharma Benefits of attending: - Discuss the challenges involved with microbial control with Takeda - Following the path to efficient sterility assurance with GSK - Bimeda highlight the importance of environmental modelling - Delve into the latest developments in rapid microbial methods with Janssen - Hear the latest on data integrity and compliance with Roche - Take part in an interactive extended training session with Microrite Running alongside the conference will be two pre-conference workshops held on the 7th June. Workshop A: Technologies for Monitoring Contamination Control and Case Studies on Contamination Control. Hosted by Jim Polarine Jr, Senior Technical Service Manager, STERIS Corporation and Andrew Bartko, Research Leader, Battelle Memorial Institute. Workshop B: Microbial Required Use for Terminal Sterilization. Hosted by Jerry Dalfors, Principal, JD Technologies For those wanting to attend, there is currently an early bird offer available; book by 28th February to save $300 off the conference price. Register at www.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcom Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA is sponsored by Charles River and Rapid Microbiosytems For sponsorship packages: Contact Alia Malick +44 (0) 207 827 6168 or e-mail amalick@smi-online.co.uk. For delegate enquiries: Contact Fateja Begum on +44 (0) 20 7827 6184 or email fbegum@smi-online.co.uk For media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 (0) 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.uk Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA 8 - 9 June 2017 San Diego, California, USA www.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcom Contact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.uk Contact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6184 #smimicrobiology About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk San Diego, CA, February 16, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Aimed at Microbiologists, Quality Control and Quality Assurance Managers, Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA 2017 will address the current challenges and developing trends of the pharmaceutical microbiology field.Through a series of presentations from handpicked industry experts, two pre-conference workshops and an additional interactive training session, the agenda will discuss hot topics such as rapid microbiology methods (RMM), risk assessment, challenges in endotoxin recovery, environmental monitoring, sterility assurance, data integrity and much more.Chairs for 2017:- Donald Singer, GSK Fellow, Steriles Microbiology, R&D, GSK- John Duguid, Senior Director, Research & Development, Vericel CorporationExpert Speaker Line-Up:- Ron Smith, Director, External Supply Integration Quality, Janssen- Ren-Yo Forng, Scientific Director, Amgen- Kevin Luongo, QC Sr. Scientist (Microbiology), Takeda- Elizabeth Hulanick, Microbiologist, Renaissance Pharmaceuticals- Paul Ricciatti, Sterility Assurance Manager, Bimeda- Jeanne Moldenhauer, Vice President, Excellent Pharma Consulting- Akua Gilbert-Arthur, Principal Scientist, Roche Molecular Systems- Jarett Scalzo, QC, Microbiology Manager, Kite PharmaBenefits of attending:- Discuss the challenges involved with microbial control with Takeda- Following the path to efficient sterility assurance with GSK- Bimeda highlight the importance of environmental modelling- Delve into the latest developments in rapid microbial methods with Janssen- Hear the latest on data integrity and compliance with Roche- Take part in an interactive extended training session with MicroriteRunning alongside the conference will be two pre-conference workshops held on the 7th June.Workshop A: Technologies for Monitoring Contamination Control and Case Studies on Contamination Control. Hosted by Jim Polarine Jr, Senior Technical Service Manager, STERIS Corporation and Andrew Bartko, Research Leader, Battelle Memorial Institute.Workshop B: Microbial Required Use for Terminal Sterilization. Hosted by Jerry Dalfors, Principal, JD TechnologiesFor those wanting to attend, there is currently an early bird offer available; book by 28th February to save $300 off the conference price. Register at www.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcomPharmaceutical Microbiology USA is sponsored by Charles River and Rapid MicrobiosytemsFor sponsorship packages: Contact Alia Malick +44 (0) 207 827 6168 or e-mail amalick@smi-online.co.uk.For delegate enquiries: Contact Fateja Begum on +44 (0) 20 7827 6184 or emailfbegum@smi-online.co.ukFor media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 (0) 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.ukPharmaceutical Microbiology USA8 - 9 June 2017San Diego, California, USAwww.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcomContact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.ukContact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6184#smimicrobiologyAbout SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


Interactive Training Session on Cleanrooms and Environmental Monitoring at Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA SMi Group presents the seventh in its series, Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA will take place in San Diego, on the 8th and 9th June 2017. San Diego, CA, March 01, 2017 --( Morgan Polen the Subject Matter Expert on Contamination Control from Microrite will be hosting the training session on 'Effects of cleanrooms and barrier systems on environmental monitoring data'. Recent warning letters show that manufacturers of aseptic products are receiving the most 483s; many are related to smoke studies. Smoke / Airflow Visualization tests are often performed by third party certifiers. However, per FDA guidance, dynamic in-situ air pattern analysis is more complex. These studies should be investigative and effective at identifying design flaws or airflow issues. They should be performed using the correct type of smoke, smoke density, and camera angles. Therefore this exclusive one hour interactive training session will cover: • Regulations and guidelines related to smoke studies • Types of smoke (and equipment) used for smoke studies-pros and cons • Execution of an investigative smoke study • Case studies with videos of bad airflows and barrier system flaws • Practical demonstration of smoke vs fog • Discussions on 483s related to smoke studies • Mistakes made during environmental monitoring in barriers with inadequate laminar flow that lead to excursions. Alongside hosting the extended training sessions, Microrite will be providing a presentation throughout the two day conference where they will be joined by GSK, Bimeda, Sanofi, Amgen, Excellent Pharma Consulting, Renaissance Pharmaceuticals, Takeda, Vericel Corporation, Roche, Merck and more. All of the speakers have been carefully handpicked to provide insightful presentations from industry experts who will share recent case studies and discuss the developing trends in the field of pharmaceutical microbiology. Running alongside the conference will be two pre-conference workshops held on the 7th June. Workshop A: Technologies for Monitoring Contamination Control and Case Studies on Contamination Control. Hosted by Jim Polarine Jr, Senior Technical Service Manager, STERIS Corporation and Andrew Bartko, Research Leader, Battelle Memorial Institute. Workshop B: Microbial Required Use for Terminal Sterilization. Hosted by Jerry Dalfors, Principal, JD Technologies For those wanting to attend, there is currently an early bird offer available; book by 31st March to save $200 off the conference price. Register at www.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcom Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA is sponsored by Charles River and Rapid Microbiosytems For sponsorship packages: Contact Alia Malick +44 (0) 207 827 6168 or e-mail amalick@smi-online.co.uk. For delegate enquiries: Contact Fateja Begum on +44 (0) 20 7827 6184 or email fbegum@smi-online.co.uk For media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 (0) 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.uk Pharmaceutical Microbiology USA 8 - 9 June 2017 San Diego, California, USA www.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcom Contact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.uk Contact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6184 #smimicrobiology About SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk San Diego, CA, March 01, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The 2017 agenda will provide, 16 thought provoking presentations, 17 leading expert speakers, 2 pre-conference workshops and an extended interactive training session.Morgan Polen the Subject Matter Expert on Contamination Control from Microrite will be hosting the training session on 'Effects of cleanrooms and barrier systems on environmental monitoring data'.Recent warning letters show that manufacturers of aseptic products are receiving the most 483s; many are related to smoke studies. Smoke / Airflow Visualization tests are often performed by third party certifiers. However, per FDA guidance, dynamic in-situ air pattern analysis is more complex. These studies should be investigative and effective at identifying design flaws or airflow issues. They should be performed using the correct type of smoke, smoke density, and camera angles. Therefore this exclusive one hour interactive training session will cover:• Regulations and guidelines related to smoke studies• Types of smoke (and equipment) used for smoke studies-pros and cons• Execution of an investigative smoke study• Case studies with videos of bad airflows and barrier system flaws• Practical demonstration of smoke vs fog• Discussions on 483s related to smoke studies• Mistakes made during environmental monitoring in barriers with inadequate laminar flow that lead to excursions.Alongside hosting the extended training sessions, Microrite will be providing a presentation throughout the two day conference where they will be joined by GSK, Bimeda, Sanofi, Amgen, Excellent Pharma Consulting, Renaissance Pharmaceuticals, Takeda, Vericel Corporation, Roche, Merck and more. All of the speakers have been carefully handpicked to provide insightful presentations from industry experts who will share recent case studies and discuss the developing trends in the field of pharmaceutical microbiology.Running alongside the conference will be two pre-conference workshops held on the 7th June.Workshop A: Technologies for Monitoring Contamination Control and Case Studies on Contamination Control. Hosted by Jim Polarine Jr, Senior Technical Service Manager, STERIS Corporation and Andrew Bartko, Research Leader, Battelle Memorial Institute.Workshop B: Microbial Required Use for Terminal Sterilization. Hosted by Jerry Dalfors, Principal, JD TechnologiesFor those wanting to attend, there is currently an early bird offer available; book by 31st March to save $200 off the conference price. Register at www.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcomPharmaceutical Microbiology USA is sponsored by Charles River and Rapid MicrobiosytemsFor sponsorship packages: Contact Alia Malick +44 (0) 207 827 6168 or e-mail amalick@smi-online.co.uk.For delegate enquiries: Contact Fateja Begum on +44 (0) 20 7827 6184 or emailfbegum@smi-online.co.ukFor media enquiries, contact Zoe Gale on +44 (0) 20 7827 6138 or zgale@smi-online.co.ukPharmaceutical Microbiology USA8 - 9 June 2017San Diego, California, USAwww.pharma-microbiology-usa.com/prcomContact e-mail: zgale@smi-online.co.ukContact tel: +44 (0) 207 827 6184#smimicrobiologyAbout SMi Group: Established since 1993, the SMi Group is a global event-production company that specializes in Business-to-Business Conferences, Workshops, Masterclasses and online Communities. We create and deliver events in the Defence, Security, Energy, Utilities, Finance and Pharmaceutical industries. We pride ourselves on having access to the world’s most forward thinking opinion leaders and visionaries, allowing us to bring our communities together to Learn, Engage, Share and Network. More information can be found at http://www.smi-online.co.uk Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SMi Group


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An Ohio man paralyzed in an accident while diving in waves can now pick up a bottle or play the video game Guitar Hero thanks to a small computer chip in his brain that lets his mind guide his hands and fingers, bypassing his damaged spinal cord. Scientists on Wednesday described accomplishments achieved by 24-year-old quadriplegic Ian Burkhart using an implanted chip that relays signals from his brain through 130 electrodes on his forearm to produce muscle movement in his hands and fingers. Burkhart first demonstrated the "neural bypass" technology in 2014 when he was able simply to open and close his hand. But the scientists, in research published in the journal Nature, said he can now perform multiple useful tasks with more sophisticated hand and finger movements. The technology, which for now can only be used in the laboratory, is being perfected with an eye toward a wireless system without the need for a cable running from the head to relay brain signals. "This study marks the first time that a person living with paralysis has regained movement by using signals recorded from within the brain," said bioelectronic medicine researcher Chad Bouton of the New York-based Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, who worked on the study at the Battelle Memorial Institute in Ohio. Burkhart said the technology lets him function like "a normal member of society." The technology potentially could help people not only after spinal cord injuries but after strokes or traumatic brain injuries, Bouton added. Burkhart, a former lacrosse goalie, suffered a broken neck and spinal cord damage at age 19 diving into a wave at North Carolina's Outer Banks in 2010, causing paralysis of his arms and legs. Such injuries disrupt nervous system signal pathways between the brain and muscles. Surgeons implanted the pea-sized chip into his motor cortex, which controls voluntary muscular activity. The chip, connected to a cable running from his head to a sleeve containing the electrodes wrapped around his forearm, sends brain signals that stimulate muscles controlling the hands and fingers. Burkhart, with six wrist and hand motions, could rotate his hand, make a fist, pinch his fingers together, grasp objects like a bottle, spoon and telephone, swipe a credit card and play the video game simulating guitar strumming. Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center neurosurgeon Ali Rezai called the results a "milestone in the evolution of brain-computer interface technology." "Things are kind of moving along better than I imagined," Burkhart said.


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: news.mit.edu

Koichi Masubuchi, professor emeritus of ocean engineering, passed away on April 1 at the age of 92 in Concord, Massachusetts. Masubuchi was a leading expert in welding science and fabrication technology whose work helped to progress the understanding of welding and the important role it plays in marine and aerospace structures. Born in Otaru, Japan, in 1924, Masubuchi served in the Japanese Navy during World War II as a ship fitter in a naval shipyard. He earned a bachelor's degree and a master’s degree from the University of Tokyo, both in naval architecture, and received a PhD in engineering from Tokyo University. He worked for five years as the chief of design and fabrication in the welding division of the Transportation Technical Research Institute in Tokyo before taking leave to serve in several different positions at the Battelle Memorial Institute in Ohio until 1962. In 1963, he moved back to Ohio to serve at Battelle Memorial Institute once again until 1968, when he started as an associate professor of naval architecture at MIT.  In 1971, he was promoted to professor in the Department of Ocean Engineering, which later became part of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He retired from MIT in 2001. Masubuchi was interested in welding from a young age and spent most of his career at Batelle and MIT dedicated to progressing the science and engineering of welding fabrication. He spent his first 10 years at MIT focused on solving welding problems NASA was having with its Apollo project. During his 50 years conducting research on welding technology, Masubuchi authored or co-authored more than 220 papers and supervised more than 130 theses. His main areas of expertise were in the heat flow, residual stresses, and distortion in weldments; the fracture of welded structures; and the welding technologies for underwater and space applications. Masubuchi served as president of the Japanese Association of Greater Boston from 1972 until 1981, and he started the Japanese Language School in 1975. He was a fellow of the American Welding Society and received the Order of Sacred Treasure Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon from the Government of Japan for advancing welding technology and promoting friendship between Japan and the United States. Masubuchi was also a member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASM International, the Marine Technology Society, the Society of Experimental Stress Analysis, and the Society of Naval Architects of Japan. Individuals wanting to make a donation in Masubuchi’s memory may send gifts to the Masubuchi Fund c/o Japanese Language School of Greater Boston at 792 Massachusetts Ave., Arlington, MA 02476. The fund was established to support the Japanese Language School of Greater Boston in honor of Masubuchi.


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

With the help of a neural prosthesis, a quadriplegic man used his paralyzed right hand to grab a bottle, swipe a credit card and play a guitar video game. Bypassing his damaged spinal cord, the system restored his ability to use his thoughts to command his hand to move. Other neural prosthetic systems have allowed paralyzed people to use their brain activity to move computer cursors, robotic limbs and wheelchairs (SN: 11/16/13, p. 22). But the new approach, described online April 13 in Nature, is the first to use brain activity to control a person’s own limb. “We literally are reconnecting the brain to the body,” study coauthor Chad Bouton of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, N.Y., said April 12 in a news briefing. Decoding brain signals and correctly stimulating muscles are “really hard things to do individually,” says biomedical engineer Levi Hargrove of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Putting those together in a human subject is “very impressive,” he says. “There’s more work to be done, of course, but this is very positive and should excite people.” In 2010, college student Ian Burkhart dived into a shallow wave and struck sand. The accident severed his spinal cord, leaving him paralyzed from the shoulders down. Burkhart volunteered to undergo brain surgery in which doctors implanted a patch of electrodes directly into his brain. These electrodes eavesdropped on the activity of nerve cells that control hand movements. Scientists listened to these cells’ behavior as Burkhart watched a range of hand and finger movements on a screen and attempted to copy the motions. A computer system then learned to recognize the neural signals that accompanied each type of movement, and an algorithm translated those signals into movement commands. A flexible sleeve of electrodes strapped to Burkhart’s forearm delivered those instructions directly by stimulating hand muscles. In 2014, Bouton and colleagues announced that Burkhart could open and close his hand using the system. Since then, Burkhart has been able to command more complex hand movements, such as wiggling his thumb in and out and flexing his wrist. The Nature paper describes how this bypass system now allows him to pick up a cup, pour and even pinch his thumb and forefinger together to pluck a skinny stir stick. “The first time when I was able to open and close my hand, it really kind of gave me that sense of hope again for the future,” Burkhart said in the briefing. The technology isn’t ready for life outside of the lab. In its current form, the system must be calibrated each time Burkhart uses it, and the electrodes in the brain may not perform as well with time. And bulky cables connect the brain electrodes to the computer system and forearm sleeve. Scientists are working on making the technology smaller, wireless and easier to use, study coauthor Nick Annetta of Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio, said in the briefing. Neural engineer José Contreras-Vidal of the University of Houston points out that technology that can translate neural activity into electrical impulses may ultimately restore other types of muscle activity, such as walking. “What we need to do is provide solutions and options,” he says.


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: www.nytimes.com

Ian Burkhart, who is paralyzed, playing a guitar video game as Nick Annetta, an electrical engineer at Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio, watches.

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