South West, United Kingdom
South West, United Kingdom

Bath Spa University is a university based in, and around, Bath, England. The institution was previously known as Bath College of Higher Education, and later Bath Spa University College. It gained full university status in August 2005. It is the UK's sixth biggest provider of Teacher Education. In 2006 it was voted the 5th best modern university in the UK by The Sunday Times University Guide. The university has been consistently ranked as one of the best creative universities in the UK by Which? every year since 2012. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.11M | Year: 2017

The overall objective of the project is to establish a top-level scientific network of several institutions and research groups from Europe and Africa on the field of slavery studies. It aims at focusing mutual efforts of 13 partners with extended and complementary competences in their respective research fields and at gathering multidisciplinary expertise in slavery-related issues by encouraging the exchange of young and senior researchers from both continents. This network will be the first of its kind in the world. Our goal is to conduct research on both historical and contemporary slavery and forced labour and to emphasize its international dimension. One of the main goals of this project is to bridge disciplinary and regional area studies or initiatives, to encourage dialogue and to engage in collaborative research. It will involve African and European researchers from various disciplines from different parts of the world with complementary skills. It will enrich the analysis of the underlying local situations and address the impact of slavery and slave trade on population histories in Europe and Africa. This project is composed of three components (training, research, diffusion) and aims to address the main objectives of the RISE programme such as: - The promotion and support scientific and technological cooperation between African and European researchers working in research institutions and universities; - The development of new collaborative linkages that will result in innovative ideas; - The building of the capacities of junior researchers; - The encouragement of exchanges and synergy between researchers, by supporting their mobility and establishing a sustainable network and reach out various communities within and outside academia.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2014 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2015

For composers in Turkey today, the urge to integrate the beauties of Turkeys rich musical heritage into contemporary concert music has become almost an imperative. But differences in tuning, texture, and between oral and notated orientations to performance have presented seemingly intractable obstacles. This project systematises practical processes essential for the creation of a new, East-West strand of contemporary music and opera. It initiates cutting-edge research workshops in Istanbul, Holland and the UK to: 1. Train top-level traditional instrumentalists and singers in Turkey effectively to perform a new repertoire; 2. Train top professional Western singers in non-Western techniques and nuances of vocal production; 3. Develop approaches for modelling such musics impacts on Turkish and Western musicians adaptive processes in rehearsal and performance, and diverse audiences perceptions of such music; 4. Create an ensemble interface (including newly designed instruments) to increase capacity for merging sounds beyond levels now achievable; 5. Produce groundbreaking studies on timbre to provide new insights into how sound is produced; 6. Establish a new template for mapping Eastern and Western tuning systems onto one another. This research, together with an orchestration manual for Turkish sounds will comprise the core of a published (CUP) team-authored e-book, Integrating Turkish Instruments and Voices into Contemporary Music (ITI), with included audio and visual examples linked as an online resource. Looking further, this projects multi-modal, transdisciplinary approach also suggests a model for probing how the free play of the imagination (Kant) possible within processes of art and its creation can provide metaphors towards understanding one of the most urgent and compelling issues of our time: how to transcend cultural barriers (real or imagined) that exist today.


Nicholls J.,Bath Spa University
Alcohol and Alcoholism | Year: 2012

Aims: To provide a snapshot content analysis of social media marketing among leading alcohol brands in the UK, and to outline the implications for both regulatory policies and further research. Methods: Using screengrab technology, the complete Facebook walls and Twitter timelines for 12 leading UK alcohol brands in November 2011 were captured and archived. A total of 701 brand-authored posts were identified and categorized using a thematic coding frame. Key strategic trends were identified and analysed in the light of contextual research into recent developments in marketing practice within the alcohol industry. Results: A number of dominating trends were identified. These included the use of real-world tie-ins, interactive games, competitions and timespecific suggestions to drink. These methods reflect a strategy of branded conversation-stimulus which is favoured by social media marketing agencies. Conclusion: A number of distinct marketing methods are deployed by alcohol brands when using social media. These may undermine policies which seek to change social norms around drinking, especially the normalization of daily consumption. Social media marketing also raises questions regarding the efficacy of reactive regulatory frameworks. Further research into both the nature and impact of alcohol marketing on social media is needed.© The Author 2012. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Fellowship | Award Amount: 131.11K | Year: 2016

The connection between human wellbeing and the natural environment is a pervasive theme in C.20th and C.21st literature. However, there has been no significant scholarship that addresses nature-wellbeing connections in modern writing. Current campaigning by the Wildlife Trusts for a Nature and Wellbeing Act suggests that now is an opportune moment to consider what C.20th and 21st century literature reveals about the role that engagements with nature play in enhancing wellbeing. What new perspectives can literature offer on subjective experiences of nature? Can policy debates about natures value be enhanced by insights into how nature and wellbeing connections have been understood and expressed in literary culture? This project examines literature that reflects on human-nature relations at several key moments between 1914 and the present, beginning with post-WW1 accounts of warfare as devastating to nature and the human and including New Nature Writing focused on relations between nature and health and popular science accounts of childhood experiences of nature. This latter period corresponds with the rise of green care approaches in health and the growth of scientific studies of nature-wellbeing relations. Green care has emerged in the context of worsening environmental crisis, which environmentalists have linked to disconnection from first-hand experiences of nature. This project explores links between literature, health and environmentalism over the last century. Its aim is to inform research and policymaking at a moment when human-nature relations are of increasingly urgent local, national and global significance, both in current wellbeing initiatives, and manifold environmental crises. Cultures of Nature and Wellbeing brings literary research into direct dialogue with other perspectives on nature-wellbeing relations in ways that will impact on campaigning by The Wildlife Trusts (WT) as they build a case a Nature and Wellbeing Act. While the WT have numerous scientific partners, this project offers unique cultural and historical insights that add new layers of understanding to research linking nature and wellbeing, showing the dynamic role that humanities research can play in public life.The project also offers an original contribution to humanities scholarship by pioneering new research methods. Using a citizens science model for the humanities, its interactive website allows readers to share literary examples of nature-wellbeing relations. This forms the basis of an online Nature and Wellbeing Library. Three Nature and Wellbeing Forums will involve experts with backgrounds in health, environment and public policy in the discussion of different perspectives on nature and wellbeing. These methods are geared to collecting evidence and expanding perspectives on the key questions and themes of the project. For example, how do the public and experts from different areas understand the terms nature and wellbeing, and how have these understandings been shaped culturally? By combining collaborative and interdisciplinary research methods with textual analysis and archival research, the project explores how nature and wellbeing relations have changed over the last century and reveals how this history shapes current human-nature relations. Finally, the project brings the fields of health and environmental humanities into dialogue. This involves overcoming the human-centred and ecocentric biases of the respective fields to examine literary responses to green care, first person accounts of recovery in encounters with nature, and the medicalisation of environmentalism, particularly the controversial notion of nature deficit disorder. How can collaboration between health practitioners and environmentalists be reproduced in new fields in the humanities? What new perspectives on the question of what it means to be human, and to be in health, might be opened up by a combined health-environmental humanities approach?


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: BBSRC | Program: | Phase: Training Grant | Award Amount: 20.00K | Year: 2015

Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 766.26K | Year: 2014

This project investigates how different ideas of the past, in particular imagined past relationships between people and nature, are conditioning the futures being urgently created now in pursuit of sustainability and the avoidance of environmental crisis. It explores tensions between traditional, indigenous and local conceptions of human/nature relationships, on the one hand, and new conceptions underlying modern market-based methods for creating green futures, on the other. We will do this through in-depth field research in western Namibia - where three of our team members have long-term research experience - and in collaboration with our local institutional partner, the National Museum of Namibia. Problems such as environmental change and sustainability are complex and require analysis that crosses disciplinary boundaries. Our research, therefore, applies methods and theory from Cultural Geography, Ethnomusicology, Environmental History, Philosophy and Social Anthropology. Our field location encapsulates tensions present in many contemporary circumstances. Here, old and new conceptions of human/nature relationships are colliding spectacularly as resources such as uranium are extracted from land which is home to some of the oldest cultures on earth, as well as to highly valued (and endangered) animal and plant species. Through engaging with diverse actors in corporate, state, NGO and local contexts, we will explore the environmental change understandings informing a range of new green entities that are being created, marketed and exchanged so as to generate sustainability. We will juxtapose these sustainability objects with ways that landscape and other species are conceived and remembered in local indigenous culture, as encoded in stories, song, dance and healing rituals. Our selected, interconnected and commodified green things are, i) green uranium (so-called because of its alleged contribution to low-carbon generation but also because the impacts of its extraction are to be offset), ii) biodiversity offsets (in which environmental harm arising from development in one location is offset by conservation activity elsewhere), iii) natural products derived from indigenous plant knowledge, iv) animal hunting trophies, and v) KhoeSan rock art heritage. This research will enhance humanities understandings of how new green objects act, and are perceived to act, to perform sustainability, and thereby to transfer past social and environmental health forwards into the future. We will complement this by in-depth analysis of perceptions regarding environmental change, assisted by the collation and exhibiting of repeat landscape photographs. In these, contemporary photographs reveal how landscapes have changed (or not) since early archival images, dating back to the late 1800s, were made. A key and iterative component of our project is the exhibiting of images, audio and video material from our research, both at the Museum in Windhoek and as mobile exhibitions in varied field contexts within Namibia. We intend this to stimulate open discussion regarding ideas of environmental change and sustainable futures, and thereby generate further research data. We will also foster public engagement through a project website with the URL www.futurepasts.net. Results from these interconnected research strands will be synthesised and theorised in a further strand. This will examine the philosophical and ethical issues arising at the interfaces between different culturally-bound understandings of human/nature relations. Our work here will flesh-out a new cross-disciplinary domain of ecocultural ethics that considers sustainability imaginaries as entwined with the cultural production of particular pasts, presents and futures. This juxtaposition of competing ethical principles underlying different sustainability perspectives will draw together the empirical material analysed in the rest of the project.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2014

We aim to investigate and develop what we are calling hydrocitizenship:- the extent to which hydrocitizenship is emerging in local areas and how it can be enhanced by arts and humanities centred interdisciplinary research (AHIR) conducted with community groups. Hydrocitizenship implies an awareness of, and responsibility for, water as a vital social and environmental resource at both the individual (citizen) and community level. Being a hydrocitizen means recognizing the complex and interconnected nature of water issues in modern society; that choices and conflicts arise from the differing demands we put on water resources; and that climate change presents added sets of challenges to future water resilience. We seek to move beyond single issue foci of water (e.g. flooding, drought, water supply security, waste disposal security, water related biodiversity, water as amenity and cultural asset) to a more holistic approach which sees these issues as interdependent and operating in catchment and engineered systems which connect communities in numerous way (upstream, downstream, across the rural urban divide, across local and even national legislative boundaries). At the same time as addressing these water-community issues we will ask a series of questions about what (local) communities are (networks/place based); how they are formed/practiced internally; how they are connected to other communities around them, and if, through thinking about environmental (water) based resources communities inevitably share (and are sometimes in conflict over), we can contribute to community and environmental resilience in interconnected ways. The detailed aims are to identify and study how local communities (and other agencies) are re-assessing their relationships with water assets and issues help enhance (or establish) local community connections to local water assets and issues consider water in a holistic, joined up way, rather than in a series of single issues (such as flooding, supply security, pollution) use water as a means of rethinking how local communities are formed and practiced consider how thinking about various water networks and issues, connect differing communities; for example up and down stream, conflicting uses of water course seek win-win synergies through addressing community/social challenges and environmental challenges in tandem place the above in national and local water focused policy initiatives reflect upon and share how arts based interdisciplinary participatory research with communities can make a significant impact in key social-environmental challenges A matrix of activities will take place across four study areas in England and wales. The overall academic team of 15 researchers from 9 universities will work with selected arts practitioners and community groups to conduct a series of participatory research project elements which will include performance, film, historical narratives. The exact form and direction of the activities will be the outcome of the preparatory co-working conducted with arts consultant and community partners. The interdisciplinary academic research linked to these elements will not only bring approaches and methods from related social science disciplines but aloes allow the research to be relevant in a range of disciplines and policy arenas.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 79.96K | Year: 2016

We value our heritage most when it seems at risk; threats of loss spur owners to stewardship. (David Lowenthal, 1996) Climate change is the greatest challenge of our times, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and combating its impacts is one of the key UN Sustainable Development Goals. One symptom of our rapidly warming world is accelerated sea level rise. With 150 million people across the world living within 3 feet of todays water levels, the consequences will affect each of us directly or indirectly. Former president of Kiribati, Anote Tong, describes the relationship between sustainable development and climate change as inseparable. For Small Island Developing States, addressing development challenges while planning for climate change is a constant struggle. Kiribati is a low-lying island nation in the Pacific Ocean, and is often defined by the grim prognosis for its future. Yet there are pressing development challenges which affect peoples lives in Kiribati today, such as access to clean water, and dealing with increasing amounts of waste. As Claire Anterea from the environmental organisation Kirican has said we will drown in rubbish before we drown in water. This project team will work with Kirican, in Kiribati, to co-design a community-level programme towards sustainable development. This grassroots approach will inform the broader development field about the specific challenges facing Kiribati, and Small Islands Developing States more generally. If heritage in its most fundamental sense is about what we value collectively, and want to preserve for the future, then it is entirely logical that academics and practitioners in the heritage field should care about the environment and sustainable development. According to a recent UNESCO report, climate change poses the greatest risk to world heritage, yet heritage concerns are not as prominent as they should be in this field. One of Kiribatis adaptation strategies is to plan for migration with dignity for its population of over 110,000. We will consult with heritage organisations in Kiribati to find out how and whether they are planning for climate change and even potential displacement. This responds to more general concerns amongst global preservation professionals, such as archivists, about their own role within climate adaptation. Should the relocation of cultural resources and archives of climate-vulnerable nations be planned? How could such an enterprise could be managed practically and ethically, and by whom? The research team will also collaborate with the artist and cultural expert Natan Itonga to make a film evoking the rich cultures of Kiribati. This is part of a creative process that aims to understand the local meaning of heritage in Kiribati, and promote awareness of what is at stake. Overall, this project explores both the scope and limitations of attempts to preserve heritage in face of rapid environmental change or when the natural environment itself is heritage at risk. What can be saved at all when the impacts of climate change are so catastrophic for nations like Kiribati, and is it still meaningful to talk about sustainable development? This project works through ideas of loss but focuses on connections; specifically, finding enduring connections to potentially lost objects to carry us into the future, caring for our current connections to land, water and non-human life, and accepting moral connections between the most polluting- and vulnerable- countries. As Anote Tong said to participants at the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit in 2013: Are we here to secure the future of each others children or just our own? Within this project, heritage is positioned as a pivotally important field of expertise for understanding that global challenges of magnitude will nonetheless be felt locally, everywhere.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 67.89K | Year: 2017

This projects plans for positive social impact follows on from earlier research, the interdisciplinary project Troubled Waters, Stormy Futures: Heritage in Times of Accelerated Climate Change. The original research project focused on ways in which coastal communities in the UK and in the low-lying island nation Kiribati were affected by coastal flooding and inundation. We sought to more fully recognise the ways in which heritage, whether built or natural, tangible or intangible, was directly affected by current or projected climate change. National and international discussion of climate adaptation was failing to fully acknowledge the ways in which climate change was affecting heritage, sense of self and place, and contributing to peoples vulnerabilities. This project respond directly to the short, medium and long-term needs identified by diverse communities and partners, and plans to address these in collaborative and empowering ways. There will be continued community-level engagement at two sites with our community partners. In the Durgan area in Cornwall, we will continue to facilitate dialogue within and between the local community, the National Trust, and the visitors who often form deep attachments to such coastlines. To support this endeavour in an enjoyable and meaningful way, an artist will be commissioned to helps those involved express their attachments to their coastal and cultural heritage, and to reflect upon their feelings about the future. The resulting work will be made available to the general public. This approach is based on the research finding that building relationships at a community level may contribute to social cohesion, resilience, feelings of belonging and effective co-stewardship of a better understood, dynamic coastline. A different approach will be used in Kiribati. Here, we found that despite the long term threat of displacement, communities were focused on the everyday challenges of regular coastal inundation and various environmental problem directly affecting health and wellbeing. We encountered researcher-fatigue in Kiribati, and a feeling that constant external fascination nonetheless fails to produce direct benefits at a community level. Consequently, we will work with the local environmental organisation, Kirican, to deliver and resource a program of community-led initiatives, education and outreach. By working with Pelenise Alofa, affiliated with both Kirican and the Pacific Centre for Environment and Sustainable Development at the University of the South Pacific, we will also be supporting her ongoing effort to establish a locally managed climate change adaptation network. This is in keeping with one of the general principles of long-term community resilience: that this is something which needs to happen concretely and proactively at a local level, and with the support of local or regional organisations. Within and between communities and heritage organisations, there is frustration at the challenges of communicating climate change. A number of our partners, including the International National Trusts Organisation and the Museum of World Culture, Sweden, also want a more pivotal role for heritage organisations in the arena of climate change and adaptation, public education and advocacy. Manchester Museum will host a workshop to combine expertise, and we will create a freely available toolkit to help heritage organisations with climate change communication in future. This project respond to a clear demand for heritage concerns to be mainstreamed in international climate change negotiation, by utilising partner networks and disseminating the multi-media resources created in the original project, which amplify urgent voices from Kiribati. There will be a cultural exchange opportunity, hosting a heritage specialist from Kiribati at UK museums to enhance capacity and networks for medium and long-term heritage management including, potentially, for a post-displacement future.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 79.79K | Year: 2016

Disrupted Histories, Recovered Pasts proposes a cross-disciplinary analysis and cross-case synthesis of experience and memory in post-conflict and postcolonial contexts. Case-research, conducted from disciplinary bases in anthropology and history, will interrogate relationships between oral histories and amateur histories with more formal written archives and historiography in a series of disrupted settings (evictions in colonial and apartheid west Namibia; memories and historical interpretations of the Egyptian Jewish diaspora; war-time evacuation in Vichy, France; recent maritime exodus of migrants from Africa; and Portuguese migrant subjectivities in post-colonial Angola). This will be complemented by systematic cross-case engagement, synthesis, theorisation and communication of case-study research, conducted through regular meetings of our core research team, a larger research workshop, and presentation to the broader AHRC-LABEX Pasp network. In the postconflict and colonial contexts of our cases, disruption is present in three senses: as the productive ways in which multiple experiences retrieved through oral histories may refract and revise historical analysis; as the happening histories of objectively disruptive events break the flow of individual and collective experience; and as a strategy for cross-disciplinary research to disrupt and democratise conventional understanding by drawing attention to occluded experiences. Recovery is also polysemic, invoking retrieval of past experiences, and the possibility for enhanced well-being, through voicing memories that may have been suppressed and attending to mismatches between public discourse about displaced groups and individual experience. We will publish our findings in a bespoke collection (the Palgrave Studies in Oral History is a possible outlet) and in peer reviewed journals such as Oral History, and make our research available in English and French to wider publics at http://disruptedhistories.net.

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