Kenmore, WA, United States
Kenmore, WA, United States

Bastyr University is a natural health arts and science university located in Kenmore, Washington and San Diego, California. It offers degrees in naturopathic medicine, acupuncture and Oriental medicine, nutrition, herbal science, ayurvedic science, exercise science, psychology, midwifery and other programs. Its main campus is on a forested property just north of Seattle, and its second campus opened in San Diego in September 2012.Bastyr is the largest of seven accredited naturopathic medical schools in North America.Bastyr also operates a teaching clinic, Bastyr Center for Natural Health, in Seattle's Fremont/ Wallingford neighborhood. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Today, with the stroke of his pen, Governor Tom Wolf adds Pennsylvania to the list of states that acknowledge the value of alternative healthcare from a qualified professional. Pennsylvania becomes the 21st U.S. jurisdiction to regulate naturopathic medicine. The new law HB516 regulates naturopathic doctors; ensuring patients can trust that their wellness professional holds a graduate degree from an accredited naturopathic medical school. Heidi Weinhold, N.D. and Legislative Chair of the Pennsylvania Association of Naturopathic Physicians (PANP), says, “This is a historic day for naturopathic medicine. The governor’s approval will throw open the doors for more Pennsylvania students to choose this academic course of study. Then, they can return home from a four-year graduate program to set up a practice as a naturopathic doctor.” The PANP members worked for the last 16 years with the state legislature to advance the much-needed recognition of this growing medical field. Their goal was to increase the credibility and minimize the confusion between professionals with an advance degree and the self-study practitioner. “Naturopathic professionals also seek to better coordinate and collaborate with medical professionals across the spectrum. We believe in integrative care, and this law gives us the stature we need to work peer-to-peer with other disciplines,” explains Dr. Weinhold. Under the new law, the terms Naturopathic Doctor and ND will be reserved exclusively for those who have attended four-year, post-graduate level programs at institutions recognized by the United States Department of Education. “This protects the scope-of-work and title for graduates from an accredited N.D. program,” offers Dr. JoAnn Yanez, executive director of the Association of Accredited Naturopathic Colleges. Naturopathic Doctors are currently practicing at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia, as well as the University of Pittsburgh Medical Centers, where they work side by side with medical doctors in an integrative setting. More patients could be served in this manner once naturopathic doctors are registered in this state. Both Penn State Hershey Medical Center and West Penn Allegheny General Hospital have indicated that they would hire Naturopathic Doctors if they were registered in the state. “The PANP will be working over the next year on implementation of the legislation in order that NDs can begin to register with the Board of Medicine. A number of Representatives and Senators have encouraged us to come back to the legislature next session in order to expand the scope of this bill. We are very encouraged about the future of naturopathic medicine in Pennsylvania,” says Dr. Marie Winters, manager of the Naturopathic Medicine Department of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America and president of PANP. The law will go into effect January 1, 2018. Pennsylvania joins these other jurisdictions which regulate naturopathic medicine: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands, and these provinces in Canada: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Saskatchewan. The Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges supports the work of its seven member colleges and promotes the naturopathic medical profession. The AANMC website is a clearinghouse for information about this growing health field and serves as a resource for prospective students of naturopathic medicine. Request Info on our colleges. AANMC’s member schools are:  Bastyr University (Seattle, Washington and San Diego, California), The Boucher Institute (British Columbia, Canada), Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (Toronto, Canada), National University of Natural Medicine (Portland, Oregon), National University of Health Sciences (Chicago, Illinois), Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences (Phoenix, Arizona), University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine (Bridgeport, Connecticut). The Association of Accredited Naturopathic Colleges is comprised of 7 colleges with 8 campuses across the U.S. and Canada. Their recent study, 2016 Graduate Success and Compensation Study found the vast majority (74 percent) of naturopathic physicians are satisfied or very satisfied with their career choice. Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary health care profession that combines the wisdom of nature with the rigors of modern science, focusing on whole-patient wellness. The study also shows that a strong majority (77 percent) of naturopathic medical professionals overall feel successful in their careers. For professionals using their degree full-time, the mean salary after graduating from naturopathic medical school is about $90,000 in the U.S. and $74,000 in Canada – more than double their annual pay prior to entering school, according to the study. More than nine out of ten (92 percent) are using their naturopathic degrees, and in a wide variety of positions, including primary care physicians, specialists, medical/health/wellness consultants, writers, public speakers, natural products industry, medical faculty and administrators. To learn more about becoming a naturopathic doctor, visit http://aanmc.org.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Today, with the stroke of his pen, Governor Tom Wolf adds Pennsylvania to the list of states that acknowledge the value of alternative healthcare from a qualified professional. Pennsylvania becomes the 21st U.S. jurisdiction to regulate naturopathic medicine. The new law HB516 regulates naturopathic doctors; ensuring patients can trust that their wellness professional holds a graduate degree from an accredited naturopathic medical school. Heidi Weinhold, N.D. and Legislative Chair of the Pennsylvania Association of Naturopathic Physicians (PANP), says, “This is a historic day for naturopathic medicine. The governor’s approval will throw open the doors for more Pennsylvania students to choose this academic course of study. Then, they can return home from a four-year graduate program to set up a practice as a naturopathic doctor.” The PANP members worked for the last 16 years with the state legislature to advance the much-needed recognition of this growing medical field. Their goal was to increase the credibility and minimize the confusion between professionals with an advance degree and the self-study practitioner. “Naturopathic professionals also seek to better coordinate and collaborate with medical professionals across the spectrum. We believe in integrative care, and this law gives us the stature we need to work peer-to-peer with other disciplines,” explains Dr. Weinhold. Under the new law, the terms Naturopathic Doctor and ND will be reserved exclusively for those who have attended four-year, post-graduate level programs at institutions recognized by the United States Department of Education. “This protects the scope-of-work and title for graduates from an accredited N.D. program,” offers Dr. JoAnn Yanez, executive director of the Association of Accredited Naturopathic Colleges. Naturopathic Doctors are currently practicing at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Philadelphia, as well as the University of Pittsburgh Medical Centers, where they work side by side with medical doctors in an integrative setting. More patients could be served in this manner once naturopathic doctors are registered in this state. Both Penn State Hershey Medical Center and West Penn Allegheny General Hospital have indicated that they would hire Naturopathic Doctors if they were registered in the state. “The PANP will be working over the next year on implementation of the legislation in order that NDs can begin to register with the Board of Medicine. A number of Representatives and Senators have encouraged us to come back to the legislature next session in order to expand the scope of this bill. We are very encouraged about the future of naturopathic medicine in Pennsylvania,” says Dr. Marie Winters, manager of the Naturopathic Medicine Department of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America and president of PANP. The law will go into effect January 1, 2018. Pennsylvania joins these other jurisdictions which regulate naturopathic medicine: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands, and these provinces in Canada: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Saskatchewan. The Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges supports the work of its seven member colleges and promotes the naturopathic medical profession. The AANMC website is a clearinghouse for information about this growing health field and serves as a resource for prospective students of naturopathic medicine. Request Info on our colleges. AANMC’s member schools are:  Bastyr University (Seattle, Washington and San Diego, California), The Boucher Institute (British Columbia, Canada), Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (Toronto, Canada), National University of Natural Medicine (Portland, Oregon), National University of Health Sciences (Chicago, Illinois), Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences (Phoenix, Arizona), University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine (Bridgeport, Connecticut). The Association of Accredited Naturopathic Colleges is comprised of 7 colleges with 8 campuses across the U.S. and Canada. Their recent study, 2016 Graduate Success and Compensation Study found the vast majority (74 percent) of naturopathic physicians are satisfied or very satisfied with their career choice. Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary health care profession that combines the wisdom of nature with the rigors of modern science, focusing on whole-patient wellness. The study also shows that a strong majority (77 percent) of naturopathic medical professionals overall feel successful in their careers. For professionals using their degree full-time, the mean salary after graduating from naturopathic medical school is about $90,000 in the U.S. and $74,000 in Canada – more than double their annual pay prior to entering school, according to the study. More than nine out of ten (92 percent) are using their naturopathic degrees, and in a wide variety of positions, including primary care physicians, specialists, medical/health/wellness consultants, writers, public speakers, natural products industry, medical faculty and administrators. To learn more about becoming a naturopathic doctor, visit http://aanmc.org.


Dr. Jamine Blesoff has recently become an instructor of Naturopathic Medicine at National University of Health Sciences in Lombard, IL. She brings with her years of experience in providing infants, children and women with natural preventative care. Dr. Blesoff looks forward to bringing her experience into the classroom to educate the next generation of naturopathic healthcare providers, and further increase the quality of care she provides her clients by being in an open, integrative environment. Dr. Jamine Blesoff received her BA from the University of Connecticut. While enrolled there, she developed the Community Health major program. This program encompasses multiple disciplines including sociology, cultural anthropology, Latino studies and pre-med sciences. Dr. Blesoff went on to graduate from Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington with a doctorate in Naturopathic Medicine. During her studies, she focused on botanical medicine, craniosacral therapy and homeopathy. She is a licensed Primary Care provider in Washington State. She is also bilingual in English and Spanish. She worked with Natural Doctors International to provide health care to individuals on the island of Ometepe in Nicaragua. She is a member of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, Illinois Association of Naturopathic Physicians, and Pediatric Association of Naturopathic Physicians. Before moving to the Chicago area, Dr. Blesoff built a successful private practice in Seattle, Washington. She currently sees patients out of Balance Health & Wellness and Serenity Acupuncture. For more information on Dr. Jamine Blesoff, please visit her website http://jamineblesoffnd.com. About the National University of Health Sciences Founded in 1906, National University of Health Sciences sets the standard of training for careers in health care and integrative medicine. The university is a champion of research, accreditation, academic excellence and high admission standards.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Joseph Pizzorno, the founder of Bastyr University and “The Father of Evidence-Based Natural Medicine,” has found the one-link causing the epidemic proportion increase of type 2 diabetes, and many other chronic conditions, and a way to reverse them. With prediabetes now approaching 37% of the U.S. population, and diabetes, once a rare condition just 50 years ago, plaguing over 9% of adults in America, this is ground-breaking news. This brings life-changing hope to what Dr. Pizzorno calls “The Sick Generation,” those in all age groups who are now trying to cope with ill-health and chronic conditions. “In my practice, lectures and teaching of future health leaders, I became concerned with the conditions that have become common-place in adults in the prime of their lives. Over the past two years, my team has reviewed thousands of studies for clues that matched with the epidemic rise of chronic conditions, symptoms and ill-health. The findings were conclusive, unnerving, and overwhelming. While diet, exercise and genetics play a role in health, toxin overload is the one common link to these conditions,” says Dr. Pizzorno. Pizzorno concluded that Toxins are the primary cause of chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes, auto-immune disease, obesity, heart disease, dementia, and many others. There are hundreds of toxins that we’re exposed to in our everyday activities, and they aren’t what you might think. This includes 60 well-researched toxins that are silent disruptors of our health including: environmental toxins, pesticides, heavy metals, plastics, food packaging, fabrics, household products, beauty products, and a shocking long list of items we commonly eat or use. This daily toxin exposure results in an accumulation of toxins in our bodies, particularly when toxin clearance is impaired or limited. Toxins build-up overtime, and many take permanent residence, like a house guest that won’t leave. This overload of toxins disrupts the endocrine system, overtaxes the liver and overwhelms the kidneys. “The impact toxins are having on our health is devastating, but the reversals have been equally astounding. Thousands of case studies have shown the body’s amazing ability to bounce-back, reverse course, and return to its normal healthy state,” says Pizzorno. Now everyone has access to the same personalized approach that Dr. Pizzorno has successfully and safely used with his patients through his new book, The Toxin Solution, How Hidden Poisons in the Air, Water, Food, and Products We Use Are Destroying Our Health – AND WHAT WE CAN DO TO FIX IT…available at http://www.thetoxinsolution.com . On this site, when ordering the book, you will be given access to an assessment of your own level of toxin exposure, and even go deeper for a personalized medically compliant 60 question review, including a free individualized Toxin Report, and a 90-day premium access to a Science-based Smart Tool used by thousands of corporate wellness clients to reduce disease risks by over 50% and improve health. Now this HIPAA health compliant tool integrates your labs and even DNA with your lifestyle information including medications, diet, toxins and more to deliver a one in a million solution, unique for you. Health leaders from around the world are praising Dr. Pizzorno’s work including Dr. Mark Hyman, Director of The Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine, “This book should be a mandatory part of all medical school curriculums. And for any human living in the 21st century seeking to improve their health, this book is the essential reading.” About The Toxin Solution Information is available at http://www.thetoxinsolution.com including a toxic risk quiz as well as links for ordering The Toxin Solution. Interviews and press inquiries can be directed to: Brooke Greenwald at: brooke(at)cornerstonepr(dot)net


Neuraxial analgesia is here to stay, yet, spirited debate continues over potential harms and the quality of research that fails to identify them. This paper proposes moving beyond the debate and examining holistically the impact of neuraxial analgesia on the psychophysiology of mother and baby. A review of alterations in functioning of many systems is followed by a suggested four-part protocol to partially restore normal physiology and emotional well-being, and improve outcomes of neuraxial analgesia. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Goldenberg J.Z.,Bastyr University
The Cochrane database of systematic reviews | Year: 2013

Antibiotics are widely prescribed; however they can cause disturbances in gastrointestinal flora which may lead to reduced resistance to pathogens such as Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Probiotics are live organisms thought to balance the gastrointestinal flora. The 45%. These results proved robust to sensitivity analyses of plausible and worst-plausible assumptions regarding missing outcome data and were similar whether considering trials in adults versus children, lower versus higher doses, different probiotic species, or higher versus lower risk of bias. Our judgment is that the overall evidence warrants moderate confidence in this large relative risk reduction. We downgraded the overall quality of evidence for CDAD to 'moderate' due to imprecision. There were few events (154) and the calculated optimal information size (n = 8218) was more than the total sample size. With respect to the incidence of C. difficile infection, a secondary outcome, pooled complete case results from 13 trials (961 participants) did not show a statistically significant reduction. The incidence of C. difficile infection was 12.6% in the probiotics group compared to 12.7% in the placebo or no treatment control group (RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.64 to 1.24). Adverse events were assessed in 26 studies (3964 participants) and our pooled complete case analysis indicates probiotics reduce the risk of adverse events by 20% (RR 0.80; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.95). In both treatment and control groups the most common adverse events included abdominal cramping, nausea, fever, soft stools, flatulence, and taste disturbance. For the short-term use of probiotics in patients that are not immunocompromised or severely debilitated, we consider the strength of this evidence to be moderate. Based on this systematic review and meta-analysis of 23 randomized controlled trials including 4213 patients, moderate quality evidence suggests that probiotics are both safe and effective for preventing Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.


Rosen D.C.,Bastyr University
Journal of counseling psychology | Year: 2012

The study examined which socio-demographic differences between clients and providers influenced interpersonal complementarity during an initial intake session; that is, behaviors that facilitate harmonious interactions between client and provider. Complementarity was assessed using blinded ratings of 114 videotaped intake sessions by trained observers. Hierarchical linear models were used to examine how match between client and provider in race/ethnicity, sex, and age were associated with levels of complementarity. A qualitative analysis investigated potential mechanisms that accounted for overall complementarity beyond match by examining client-provider dyads in the top and bottom quartiles of the complementarity measure. Results indicated significant interactions between client's race/ethnicity (Black) and provider's race/ethnicity (Latino) (p = .036) and client's age and provider's age (p = .044) on the Affiliation axis. The qualitative investigation revealed that client-provider interactions in the upper quartile of complementarity were characterized by consistent descriptions between the client and provider of concerns and expectations as well as depictions of what was important during the meeting. Results suggest that differences in social identities, although important, may be overcome by interpersonal variables early in the therapeutic relationship. Implications for both clinical practice and future research are discussed, as are factors relevant to working across cultures.


Background: The fetal occiput posterior position poses challenges in every aspect of intrapartum care - prevention, diagnosis, correction, supportive care, labor management, and delivery. Maternal and newborn outcomes are often worse and both physical and psychological traumas are more common than with fetal occiput anterior positions. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine prevailing concepts that guide labor and birth management with an occiput posterior fetus, and summarize evidence to clarify the state of the science. Methods: A search was conducted of the databases of PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Additional valuable information was obtained from obstetric and midwifery textbooks, books and websites for the public, conversations with maternity care professionals, and years of experience as a doula. Results: Nine prevailing concepts are as follows: (1) prenatal maneuvers rotate the occiput posterior fetus to occiput anterior; (2) it is possible to detect the occiput posterior fetus prenatally; (3) a fetus who is occiput anterior at the onset of labor will remain in that position throughout labor; (4) back pain in labor is a reliable sign of an occiput posterior fetus; (5) the occiput posterior fetus can be identified during labor by digital vaginal examination; (6) an ultrasound scan is a reliable way to detect fetal position; (7) maternal positions facilitate rotation of the occiput posterior fetus; (8) epidural analgesia facilitates rotation; (9) manual rotation of the fetal head to occiput anterior improves the rate of occiput anterior deliveries. Concepts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 have little scientific support whereas concepts 6, 7, and 9 are supported by promising evidence. Conclusions: Many current obstetric practices with respect to the occiput posterior position are unsatisfactory, resulting in failure to identify and correct the problem and thus contributing to high surgical delivery rates and traumatic births. The use of ultrasound examination to identify fetal position is a method that is far superior to other methods, and has the potential to improve outcomes. Research studies are needed to examine the efficacy of midwifery methods of identification, and the effect of promising methods to rotate the fetus (simple positional methods and digital or manual rotation). Based on the findings of this review, a practical approach to care is suggested. © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Lamson D.W.,Bastyr University
Alternative Medicine Review | Year: 2010

Eucalyptus oil (EO) and its major component, 1,8-cineole, have antimicrobial effects against many bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), viruses, and fungi (including Candida). Surprisingly for an antimicrobial substance, there are also immune-stimulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, analgesic, and spasmolytic effects. Of the white blood cells, monocytes and macrophages are most affected, especially with increased phagocytic activity. Application by either vapor inhalation or oral route provides benefit for both purulent and non-purulent respiratory problems, such as bronchitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is a long history of folk usage with a good safety record. More recently, the biochemical details behind these effects have been clarified. Although other plant oils may be more microbiologically active, the safety of moderate doses of EO and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial action make it an attractive alternative to pharmaceuticals. EO has also been shown to offset the myelotoxicity of one chemotherapy agent. Whether this is a general attribute that does not decrease the benefit of chemotherapy remains to be determined. This article also provides instruction on how to assemble inexpensive devices for vapor inhalation.


Patrick L.,Bastyr University
Alternative Medicine Review | Year: 2011

Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), a common disorder in the Western world, can lead to complications that include esophageal stricture and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Multiple challenges are associated with GERD treatment. First, lack of symptoms does not correlate with the absence of or the healing of esophageal lesions. Second, proton pump inhibitors, the current standard of care for GERD, are ineffective for the majority of GERD patients who have non-erosive disease. This article discusses these challenges, investigates the mechanisms of damage in GERD, and explores the existing data on unconventional forms of treatment, including melatonin, acupuncture, botanicals, and dietary interventions. Copyright © 2011 Alternative Medicine Review, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Loading Bastyr University collaborators
Loading Bastyr University collaborators