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Highland Park, IL, United States

Hamilton R.,Basler Electrical Company
Record of Conference Papers - Annual Petroleum and Chemical Industry Conference | Year: 2012

Security is of concern in differential protection during transformer energization. Inrush current occurs mostly in only one side of the transformer and could cause a false differential trip. A common restraint method is to use the second harmonic information in the inrush current to secure differential protection when energizing transformers. © 2012 IEEE. Source


Ransom D.L.,Basler Electrical Company
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2014

There are many advantages to upgrading old electromechanical (EM), solid-state, and first-generation numeric relays with modern numeric relays. Reliability increases because there is less direct wiring and interconnec-tion wiring, and the reliability and security of multifunction logic and settings are improved with the next-generation user interface software. Remote input-output modules, remote analog/digital inputs, and thermal measurement capabilities have expanded protection, control, and monitoring. New pro-tection and monitoring features improve power system equipment life and increase personnel safety. Maintenance costs are reduced, while internal watchdogs alert the user if the relay has a problem. Settings groups can be changed instantaneously to adapt to varying power-system require-ments. Modern second-generation numeric relays offer a vari-ety of secure communications capabilities for interfacing with smart-grid controls, supervisory control and data-acquisition systems, and business networks. Event memory is larger for more onboard, standardized oscillographs and event reporting. Relay security is in accord with the latest North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) standards. © 2014 IEEE. Source


Ransom D.L.,Basler Electrical Company
Conference Record - Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Technical Conference | Year: 2013

There are many advantages to upgrading old electromechanical, solid-state, and first-generation numeric relays with modern numeric relays. Reliability increases because there is less direct wiring and interconnection wiring. Reliability and security of multifunction logic and settings are improved with next-generation user interface software. Remote I/O modules, remote analog/digital inputs, and thermal measurement capabilities have expanded the protection, control, and monitoring. New protection and monitoring features improve power system equipment life and increase personnel safety. Maintenance costs are reduced, while internal watchdogs alert the user if the relay has a problem. Settings groups can be changed instantaneously to adapt to varying power system requirements. Modern, second-generation numeric relays offer a variety of secure communications capabilities for interfacing with Smart Grid controls, SCADA systems, and business networks. Event memory is larger for more on-board, standardized oscillographs and event reporting. Relay security is in accord with the latest NERC standards. Initially, every relay upgrade seems simple and straight forward; then come the details. Operating personnel have expectations for reading targets, resetting trips, ease of interface for settings and events, motor restarting, synch closing, etc. Regulator requirements (NERC-CIP, for example) must be implemented while maintaining smooth operations. Relay engineers must assure that operational ease is maintained with the new upgrade relay. Accurate one-line drawings and connection drawings, as well as good wiring documentation, are essential. Escutcheon plates might be necessary, or perhaps switchgear will need modification (panel cutting, new doors, relocation, etc). Also, this is an opportunity to reevaluate arc-flash hazards and possibly reduce the risks. These and other considerations are taken from actual relay replacement projects. This paper provides guidance for your next replacement or upgrade project, resulting in reducing cost, saving time, and minimizing unexpected or unplanned complications. © 2013 IEEE. Source


Schaefer R.C.,Basler Electrical Company
IEEE Conference Record of Annual Pulp and Paper Industry Technical Conference | Year: 2013

In the 1960s, many generator manufacturers began providing large scale brushless rotating exciters for use on a variety of turbine generator applications. The brushless exciters became increasingly popular in the 1970s through the present. Prior to brushless excited generators, rotating exciters were all rotating brush type which required brushes and commutators to rectify the voltage from ac to dc. Slip rings then apply the rectified dc voltage to the main field of the generator via the brushes, springs and holders. Today, in some applications, the brushless rotating exciter is being removed and a static exciter installed because of issues with the brushless exciter. This paper will discuss the retrofit process of a brushless rotating exciter to a static exciter main field system © 2013 IEEE. Source


Ransom D.L.,Basler Electrical Company
2014 67th Annual Conference for Protective Relay Engineers, CPRE 2014 | Year: 2014

This paper presents a review of powersystem synchronization. When two sources are paralleled, it is crucial to close the interconnecting circuit breaker when both sources are in voltage, frequency, and phase coincidence. © 2014 IEEE. Source

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