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News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

According to Stratistics MRC, the Wearable technology market accounted for $11.43 billion in 2015 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 18.4% to reach $37.39 billion by 2022. The factors such as increasing awareness of technologies in smartphone and internet applications, wide applications in healthcare and sensor technologies, growing recognition for wearable fitness & medical devices, emerging urban lifestyle and growing advancements in technologies are some of the factors driving the market growth. However, high power consumption, low battery life, huge initial cost are some of the factors restraining the market. Furthermore, increasing adoption of wearable technology in several applications is one of the biggest opportunities for the market growth over the forecast period. By Application, Enterprise & industrial segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period owing to its rising demand for wearable computing devices and scanners. North America accounted for the largest share however, Asia Pacific is estimated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period, attributed to factors such as rising health awareness, new innovations and advancements in technology and product usage. Some of the key players in global ceramic coating market include Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Xiaomi Technology Co. Ltd., Apple Inc., Qualcomm Inc., Fitbit Inc., 270 Vision, ARA (Applied Research Associates), Acer, 3L Labs, Sony Corp., Abbot Laboratories, Basis (Basis Science), Garmin Ltd. , Pebble Technology Corp., LG Electronics Inc., and Google Inc. Technologies Covered: • Networking Technologies (Bluetooth,RFID, NFC, ANT+, and Wi-Fi) • Speech Recognition Technologies • Computing Technologies (Wearable Computers) • Sensor Technologies (Accelerometers and Mems) • Display Technlogies (HUD, HMD, and Augmented Reality) • Positioning Technologies (Gps and Digital Compass) • Lowed Powered Wireless SoC Technologies • Energy Harvesting Technologies • Ergonomics & Materials Science Technologies Leave a Query @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/enquiry/562720-wearable-technology-global-market-outlook-2015-2022 Products Covered: • Neckwear o Ties and Collars o Fashion and Jewellery • Eyewear o Contact Lenses and Other (HMD, HUD, Augmented) Displays o Smart Glasses and Goggles • Wrist wear o Wrist Bands o Wrist Wear Computers and Watches • Footwear o Special Purpose Footwear o Casual Footwear Body wear o Fashion & Apparel o Arm & Legwear o Clothing and Inner Wear • Head worn devices o Smart caps o Smart headsets o Fit guards o Head Bands • Other wearable technologies o Ring Scanners Applications Covered: • Healthcare o Non-Clinical Applications o Clinical Applications • Enterprise & Industrial Applications o Logistics, Packaging, & Warehouse Applications o Other Industrial Applications o Other Applications • Consumer Electronics o Multi-Function Applications o Fitness & Sports Applications o Garments & Fashion Applications o Infotainment & Multimedia Applications • Other Applications Smart Textile Covered: • Smart Wearable Functions o Luminescence & Aesthetics o Sensing o Energy Harvesting o Thermo-Electricity o Power generation or storage o Radio frequency functioning o Sensing o Other Functions • Smart Textile Type o Ultra-Smart Textiles o Passive Smart Textiles o Active Smart Textiles • Smart Technology o Printing conductive inks o Weaving or knitting o Disposition of conductive polymers • Other Smart Textiles Buy now @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/checkout?currency=one_user-USD&report_id=562720 Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK o Spain o Rest of Europe • Asia Pacific o Japan o China o India o Australia o New Zealand o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/562720-wearable-technology-global-market-outlook-2015-2022


Spanne A.,Basis Science | Jorntell H.,Basis Science
Trends in Neurosciences | Year: 2015

Coding principles are central to understanding the organization of brain circuitry. Sparse coding offers several advantages, but a near-consensus has developed that it only has beneficial properties, and these are partially unique to sparse coding. We find that these advantages come at the cost of several trade-offs, with the lower capacity for generalization being especially problematic, and the value of sparse coding as a measure and its experimental support are both questionable. Furthermore, silent synapses and inhibitory interneurons can permit learning speed and memory capacity that was previously ascribed to sparse coding only. Combining these properties without exaggerated sparse coding improves the capacity for generalization and facilitates learning of models of a complex and high-dimensional reality. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Patent
Basis Science | Date: 2013-10-21

A system and a method are disclosed for identifying and characterizing a stress state of a user based on features of blood flow identified from optical signals. One embodiment of a disclosed system (and method) includes an optical sensing system to detect features of blood flow and identify and characterize a stress state of a user based on those blood flow features. Light transmitted or reflected from tissue of the user is measured by an optical sensor. A processor analyzes the received optical signal to identify features of the blood flow. The stress state of the user is determined based on the identified features. The stress state is characterized according to a type of stress, a level of stress or both. Additionally stress events are identified.


Patent
Basis Science | Date: 2011-12-23

A biometric device configured to be attached to a portion of a body of a user measures biometric data of the user. The device includes an optical emitter, a wavelength filter, an optical sensor and a processor, for sending a light to the body of a user, receiving light received from the user, filtering and processing it to measure biometric data of the user, including for example, heart rate and blood flow rate. In addition, the biometric device may include other sensors, such as a galvanic skin response sensor, an ambient temperature sensor, skin temperature, motion sensor, etc., to enable the biometric device to measure arousal or conductivity changing events, ambient temperature, user temperature and motion associated with the user. Additionally, information from each sensor may be used to further filter noise in one or more signals received by the sensors to provide biometric data to the user.


News Article | January 2, 2015
Site: www.cnet.com

When it comes to wearable technology, more may not always be better. At the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas next week, device makers will tackle this conundrum as they display cutting-edge new devices on the world's stage, discussing what's to come and how we'll get there. Wearable devices are undoubtedly a key new technology. By 2018, wearable shipments are expected to jump to 112 million units, more than five times last year's figure, according to market researcher IDC. Even the fashion magazine Vogue put the Apple Watch, one of the most anticipated devices next year, on one of its covers. Smart glasses and virtual-reality headsets, once reserved for sci-fi fantasies, are at last trickling into the market as consumer products. So what's next? Gadget makers at this year's show will duke it out to see not just who else is in the wearable game, but also whose take is the best fit for the future. Wearable tech's biggest names, from Samsung and LG to Motorola and Intel, are expected to stake out their positions ahead of the Apple Watch's arrival. Other, smaller wearable companies are expected to partner with each other and larger traditional companies, like Adidas and other big names in sports, fitness and apparel, to try to stay in the game. But the real debate playing out at CES and beyond will be much more technical. At hand is a philosophical question: Do customers want to buy one device that can do almost everything? Or do they want to buy a bunch of connected products -- like shoes, shirts and glasses -- that work together toward a common goal. Companies are already choosing sides, but analysts say they aren't convinced there's a clear answer yet. "I think that's going to be one of the real issues in the market," said Wes Henderek, an analyst and director of connected intelligence at the NPD Group. What probably won't work, he said, is any device that tries to do too much, and ends up being good at nothing. Apple is solidly in the do-it-all camp. The Apple Watch, expected this spring, will have a full color screen, heart-rate-reading technology, fitness- and health-tracking software and a host of apps, from productivity to communication. It will cost upward of $350. Apple's approach is not an exception. Google's Android Wear software, which powers smartwatches from Samsung, LG and Motorola, is also designed to do many things. The Moto 360 smartwatch, for instance, can now play games, sport an interactive James Bond-inspired watch face, run note-taking app Evernote and take voice commands to feed walking and driving directions to your wrist. Samsung's Gear S watch even has a cellular radio in it so users can make phone calls, just like Dick Tracy used to in the comics, or even leave their phones behind. But not everyone agrees with this approach. A growing collection of startups are making specialized devices instead. They're outfitting sensors on everything from shirts and skis to assembly plant gloves and 3D-printed prosthetics, and they're generally cheaper than those watches made by the big boys. Because these devices are not trying to do everything for everyone, they're both less expensive and potentially more useful and powerful in performing specific tasks. There's also the promise of a way for these gadgets to talk to one another, creating a network of devices around our bodies. Smart earbuds could read your heart rate and send the information to a wristband that tracks body movements. A smart shirt could collect more sensitive data like perspiration, skin temperature and hydration levels. Then mobile apps can wrap everything in a neat package and display it on your smartphone. There are already signs some customers agree. Forrester surveyed thousands of US consumers in March and found a majority of people want a wearable for their wrist, like a do-it-all Apple Watch. But demand is still growing for specialized devices, like jewelry, clip-on devices and embedded sensors for shirts and shoes. In 2015, industry researcher Gartner expects shipments of smart clothing to jump from 100,000 units to more than 10 million, notching almost a third of the total expected global sales of smartwatches. Even some within Google's ranks say this approach makes sense. When the Internet giant first unveiled its connected headset called Google Glass in 2012, the company thought of it as a head-worn computer. Now, as other devices have proliferated, some Google executives are arguing no one device can do everything. "Glass is meant to be one device of many," said Astro Teller, head of the secretive Google X research lab, where Glass was developed. "You're going to end up wearing lots of things." He said Google's approach can be summed up by looking at another wearable to come out of Google X: the smart contact lens. The product, which is set to be produced by the pharmaceutical giant Novartis, has a small computer processor embedded onto the contact lens. The goal is to help diabetes patients by reading the glucose levels in tears. He said it would be silly to try to load the lens up with different features and uses, especially given how small the product is. "You're not going to want to put everything in the kitchen sink onto a contact lens," he said. So far, that idea of restraint has proved successful, albeit with devices that are quickly becoming outdated. Startups like Fitbit, Jawbone and Withings, alongside traditional device makers like watchmaker Garmin, have long been selling wearables that do just a few things well enough to catch on with consumers. Smart bands and fitness trackers, as they're called, have become the face of wearable tech. Though some of those companies, like Fitbit, have begun packing in more features -- like a display for telling the time and showing steps walked -- these devices have focused on specific fitness-oriented functions like measuring workout activity and tracking sleep. A companion smartphone app lets consumers input calories consumed and other things these devices can't measure. [Google] Glass is meant to be one device of many. You're going to end up wearing lots of things. So far, that approach looks to be working. Sales of the company's products represented 68 percent of the fitness tracker market between April 2013 and March 2014, according to NPD. Yet the explosion of smartwatches, particularly with the effects the Apple Watch may have on the market, will result in a slowdown in fitness band sales next year, says Gartner. Fitbit is expanding its efforts, though. The company in October announced the Surge, a smartwatch of its own. The device isn't meant to compete against Apple though: It doesn't have a color screen or a collection of apps, and it's still geared toward the company's fitness-tracking focus. Jawbone, Fitbit's primary competitor, released its Up3 this fall. The device, which is a successor to the popular Up bands it's been making since 2012, still does not contain a screen either. But, Jawbone says it doesn't need one to perform popular functions, like heart rate monitoring. "I'll probably buy a smartwatch, but the smartwatch is not how I'll track my sleep," Andrew Rosenthal, Jawbone's manager for wellness and fitness, said last month at a wearable roundtable. "We're not trying to build a smartwatch. It's not where we'll win." There are still indications that specialized devices ultimately won't succeed as large tech companies push consumers toward smartwatches. Apparel giant Nike entered wearables in early 2012 with its FuelBand fitness tracker, a no-frills wristband designed for athletes and fitness junkies. Yet barely two years later, the company fired the hardware team responsible for FuelBand development, while Nike CEO Mark Parker confirmed the company's focus was moving to its Nike+ software. Nike, perhaps, saw the writing on the wall -- the company has partnered with Apple in the past and Apple CEO Tim Cook has been a member of Nike's board of directors for almost a decade. A Nike+ app is expected to appear on the Apple Watch next spring. There's a reason to believe wearable devices will ultimately become all-in-one machines: The smartphone market went through the same transition. The first devices were wireless phones, then two-way pagers. But eventually, they added capabilities, replacing fax machines, calculators, handheld cameras, GPS devices and more. "That's usually how these device wars play out: the battle of general purpose versus single purpose or specialized," Tim Chang, a venture capitalist at Mayfield Fund, said. Chang co-founded wearable maker Basis Science in 2010 and earlier this year sold it Intel for about $100 million. Why is it different this time? One challenge is battery life. Marquee smartwatches like the Samsung Gear Live and Moto 360 have been criticized for bad battery usage. (CNET's review of the Gear Live in July called the battery life "terrible.") Apple CEO Tim Cook also suggested the Apple Watch wouldn't last more than a day before needing a charge, saying users would juice it up overnight. There are some exceptions, though. The Pebble smartwatch lasts between five and seven days of use, thanks in part to the company's choice to use buttons instead of touch, and to avoid a color screen. Microsoft's Band, a cross between a fitness wristband and a smartwatch with a color screen and a heart rate reader, has a battery life up of to 48 hours. Simpler devices that don't try to do too many things tend to last longer -- as opposed to something as monolithic as a smartwatch, which can be a power suck. Google's Teller said he thinks wearables will be distributed across our bodies in ways that best suit fashion and battery life. He's not the only one who thinks so. For example, musician Will.i.am launched his own smartband, called the Puls, in October. The device has been panned in reviews, but when he made the announcement, he also talked about other wearables in the pipeline for his company, I.am+. One of the items: a smart jacket that charges your watch when the sleeve touches it. Ultimately, analysts say an all-in-one design will likely win out in the short term, particularly since that's how it's gone for everything else. Laptops, desktops, printers, smartphones -- they all tend to take on extra functions over time. Mayfield's Chang notes TomTom grew successful selling GPS units to car owners only to have its primary product become commonplace software built into mobile phones. "It's the specialized ones that have been around awhile that have to be the most nervous," he said.


News Article | June 18, 2015
Site: www.zdnet.com

Intel has completed its acquisition of smart eyewear designer Recon Instruments. In 2013, Intel Capital -- the investment and venture capital arm of Intel Corp -- invested $4 million in Recon Instruments for its product development, marketing, and global sales expansion. "The growth of wearable technology is creating a new playing field for innovation, and we've made tremendous strides in developing products and technologies to capture this next wave of computing," Josh Walden, senior vice president and general manager of Intel's New Technology Group, said. Recon co-founder and CEO Dan Eisenhardt said the chip giant is an ideal partner for his company. "This is a tremendous opportunity that will lead to amazing things, just as much for us as for our customers. "As part of Intel, we'll have the resources to continue the mission we began with the creation of Recon in 2008, but with a level of efficacy and speed that's beyond the reach of a pioneer in a new market," Eisenhardt said in a blog post. Terms of the deal have not been disclosed by either party, but the smart eyewear CEO said that Recon will stay in Vancouver to retain its talent, brand, and "entrepreneurial spirit". The acquisition of Recon adds to Intel's growing portfolio of wearables, with the microprocessor giant purchasing smartwatch maker Basis Science early last year.


Intel, as always, is hoping to attract more consumer electronic manufacturers to use its chips in their devices. This time around, the company is targeting makers building wearable devices with a new chip and development platform. Intel largely missed the boat on wireless and tablet chips, but is trying to get ahead of the curve in new computing platforms that are emerging. Last year at CES, the company announced an SD-card sized development module called Edison based on its Quark SOC. The company has also worked to acquire and partner with other CE manufacturers to get its chips in their devices. That includes its acquisition of smartwatch maker Basis Science, as well as partnerships with design house Opening Ceremony and Fossil to build more fashionable wearables. But there’s only so much partnering Intel can do to get its chips used in wearables. To convince other companies to build devices based on its chips, the company is introducing a new generation of chip and development platform for wearable device makers. The Quark SE SOC will feature a low-power, 32-bit microcontroller with 384 kB of flash memory and 80 kB SRAM. It also has a combination sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope and Bluetooth Low Energy support. Along with the Quark SE chip, Intel is releasing a development module called Curie. The platform is designed to have all the features that are necessary for developers who are hoping to build their own wearables, including low-power Bluetooth connectivity, motion sensors, and battery charging. The hope is that Curie can help speed up wearable development. That’s held up today by device makers’ need to develop on their own custom boards, according to Mike Bell, VP and GM of Intel’s New Devices Group. While Intel isn’t announcing pricing of its new chips, Bell said they will be shipping later this year and will be competitive to other options out there — mostly old, repurposed mobile chips. But Intel’s chips will have the benefit of being built just for wearables, and will focus a lot on battery management — which, given the fact that wearables are always sensing something, is probably the most important thing.


News Article | May 19, 2015
Site: venturebeat.com

It’s been more than a year since Intel acquired Basis Science, the maker of the Basis Peak fitness-tracking watches. And, just in time to compete with the Apple Watch, Basis is launching a new Titanium Edition of its Basis Peak. In contrast to Apple’s device (which costs anywhere from $350 to $17,000), the Basis Peak Titanium Edition goes on sale today for just $300, while the existing Basis Peak regular edition will continue to sell for $200. That’s a good price, considering that Basis has loaded sensors into its device to track your heart rate, measure your sleep duration and quality, and discern whether you are swimming, walking, running, or biking. “People like dressing up and being fashionable,” said Jef Holove, general manager of the Basis division at Intel, in an interview with VentureBeat. “And we have the combination of features that makes our smartwatch the most useful.” The new Titanium Edition has a titanium steel watch case with a fashionable leather strap. The case has a satin finish Grade II titanium base that resists nicks, scratches, and corrosion. It has a black (Onyx) SportVent silicone strap and a caramel brown (Cognac) leather strap. Basis is also launching a series of leather straps in a variety of colors as accessories for its existing Basis Peak fitness trackers. Those strap colors include Noir, Fog, Saddle, Khaki and Blush, in addition to the five colors of SportVent straps already available. The new leather straps cost $50 each, while the silicone SportVent straps are $30. “People have begun to think of us in their mind as a smartwatch,” said Holove. “We have features in common with notifications, but we are not in the same category as general-purpose devices like Samsung and Apple watches. We are squarely focused on the premium health and fitness space. We intend to give you the most comprehensive view of your health. That is what we do deep.” Basis is also announcing today another big feature: You’ll be able to export your fitness data to Google Fit or Apple Health apps. You can sync your Peak data easily with popular health and diet tracking apps for a more comprehensive view of activity, fitness, diet, and sleep. “We take the approach that your data belongs to you,” Holove said. Basis will share the number of steps you take in a day as well as calculations such as calories burned; heart rate; start/stop time; durations of runs, walks, and bike rides; and sleep duration. Holove said the Apple Health and Google Fit integrations have been among the most requested customer features. The features are available in an app update that is launching today. The new app update gives you access to a new feature called Basis Peak Playground. The playground allows users to provide feedback on experimental features, including Photo Finish, or the ability to take annotated “selfies” of yourself just after you complete a workout. You can share that selfie with friends on social networks such as Facebook or Twitter. I haven’t tried the latest Titanium edition yet. But I’ve had hands-on experience with Basis watches since they debuted for the first time in 2012 and then again with the launch of the Basis Peak in 2014. The bands had occasional problems. The first one wasn’t that waterproof. But the watch itself proved to be very accurate at measuring data such as your heart rate. The Basis Peak broke down on me a couple of times and I had to get some help rebooting it. The Peak also had problems connecting via Bluetooth on my Apple iPhone 5S after the iOS 8 update appeared. While these problems showed that it isn’t that easy to put a computing technology in a watch, I was impressed with the continuous improvement that the San Francisco-based Basis team has shown in upgrading the quality and look of its products and services. It has a battery life of four days and water resistance up to five times the ordinary atmospheric pressure (ATM). Basis also gives you a great picture of how much time you spend in a day doing activities such as sleeping, walking, running, swimming, or biking. It can come up with a more accurate view of the calories you burn in a day as a result. Basis has done seven updates for the Peak that have added features such as smartwatch notifications for text messages, phone calls, and calendar events. Holove said Basis added those features because the team knows that you won’t have more than one smart device on your wrist, and smartwatch owners want those features in addition to fitness data. On May 20, Basis is launching a firmware update that will address some of the problems I had with reliability. The new update improves the accuracy of the Basis Peak’s measurements, and it also addresses problems that arose with the iOS 8 updates from Apple when it comes to Bluetooth connectivity. On top of that, the firmware update adds a new feature in the form of a stopwatch. You can tap the screen to start the stopwatch and tap it again to stop it. “We constantly measure how accurate the watch is at capturing your heart rate, and we have done more work on that algorithm,” Holove said. But Holove said the company is not seeking federal approval as a medical device, since it is targeting the mainstream consumer market. Other devices such as Vital Connect claim to have more accurate heart rate data via chest straps, but Holove believes most consumers won’t strap something to their chests. As for working under Intel, Holove said the past year has been good. Intel has better supply chain relationships, as a big company. And it has a bunch of teams working on research that is directly relevant to wearable devices such as the Basis Peak, he said. “On top of that, we get much better visibility under Intel,” he said.


News Article | January 7, 2015
Site: www.theverge.com

Intel spent most of 2014 shifting its focus to wearables by buying fitness band company Basis Science and creating partnerships with fashion companies. But CEO Brian Krzanich just announced a major extension of that focus at the company's CES keynote presentation with the Intel Curie Module. It's a low-power hardware module that could be used to build wearables out of things like rings, bags, pendants, or glasses. The module uses a new version of Intel's Quark chip — the Quark SE — to enable such compact wearable technologies. It's capable of being integrated into such small form factors that Krzanich even showed it off in a coat button on stage. Curie uses Bluetooth LE and includes a low-power sensor hub, a pattern-matching accelerator that allows for accurate gesture recognition, and a six-axis combination accelerometer and gyroscope, all crucial ingredients for making compact wearables. On top of all that Curie runs Viper, an open-source software that can take the information gathered by those internals and use it for things like activity recognition or step tracking. Intel did most of the work for you The hope is that companies use Curie to bypass difficult developmental steps like designing circuitboards or tweaking Bluetooth radios, according to Mike Bell, VP and GM of Intel's New Devices Group. As he told me a few hours before the press conference, "[Curie] essentially gets you pretty far along towards a product, you really just have to add your secret sauce on top of this and you’d have a pretty great wearable product." Bell used the breadth of creative ideas being spawned by the company's Edison platform — the more broadly-focused predecessor to Curie — as a reference point for why he believes Curie is important. "We saw all these people had all these great ideas, but the barrier to entry to this stuff is pretty high because the technology is very small and very integrated." The Intel Curie Module will be available in the second half of 2015.


The global wearable medical devices market is teeming with small private players and their innovative product offerings. As a result, the market is highly fragmented and competition is stiff. Maximum number of companies operating in the market are focused on popular segments such as heart rate monitors and activity monitors. A few of the better known companies operating in the industry are Basis Science Inc., Corventis Inc., Draeger, Everist Genomics, Inc., Fitbit Inc., Nuubo, and LifeWatch AG. Transparency Market Research finds that the wearable medical devices market is in a nascent stage and is poised to explode in the near future with the unveiling of breakthrough products at a rapid pace. In fact, a noticeable trend in the market has been the rapid emergence of innovative technologies, even for the smallest of applications. Take for instance the product called Instabeat, which is meant to cater to a small group of people who are professional swimmers and is specifically designed for use in wet weather conditions and water. Such launches bear testimony to the fact that companies are lapping up every opportunity to target consumers with various tailor-made wearable technologies. The latest trend in the market has been a shift towards making healthcare wearable devices from sports and fitness devices. On account of stiff competition, the global wearable medical devices market is expected to reach a value of US$5.827 bn by 2019, exhibiting a very strong growth rate in the coming years. Depending upon its various applications, wearable medical devices can be segmented into sports and fitness, remote patient monitoring, and home care. Many of the products have overlapping uses. Wearable devices in sports and fitness, which include heartbeat monitors and activity monitors, measure heart rate, calories burned, distance walked, etc. using embedded sensors. The segment held a dominant market share amounting to US$1.82 bn in 2015 and is slated to maintain its position in the years to come. By the type of diagnostic devices used, the global market for wearable medical devices can be segmented broadly into wearable vital sign monitors, wearable fetal monitors, and wearable neuromonitors. Among them, vital sign monitors have been leading the market with a dominant share. From a geographical standpoint, North America has held a sway over the market, beating Europe, which comes a close second. The two continents are considered manufacturing hubs for wearable devices. This has resulted from a substantial focus on research and development by both small and large players in the regions. In terms of market size, North America was worth US$1.05 in 2015. Asia Pacific is slated to demonstrate maximum growth in the coming years on account of a massive uptick in demand. A massive pool of innovators and early adopters has been one of the main drivers of growth in the global wearable medical devices market.  Further, the rising prevalence of chronic pain and diabetes is also driving market growth. Explains the lead analyst of the TMR report, “The demand for wearable therapeutic devices such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and electromagnetic stimulation (PEMF) among several others has increased significantly due to a rise in the cases of chronic pain. Other therapeutic devices such as Pancreum’s Vigil and Omnipod are a boon for people requiring continuous glucose monitoring devices.” Given the cost of such devices, however, most middle and low income groups in emerging economies consider it to be an unnecessary luxury. Another factor restraining the growth of the market is reimbursement issues. “Trackers and activity monitors are not reimbursed like other medical devices. This may prove to be a restraint for remote patient monitoring and telemedicine since most of these devices tend to be priced higher than the average cost. Conventionally, the mHealth market has always faced issues with reimbursement and this is expected to continue in the coming years as well,” elaborates the analyst of the report. Transparency Market Research (TMR) is a market intelligence company, providing global business information reports and services. Our exclusive blend of quantitative forecasting and trends analysis provides forward-looking insight for thousands of decision makers. We have an experienced team of Analysts, Researchers, and Consultants, who us e proprietary data sources and various tools and techniques to gather, and analyze information. Our business offerings represent the latest and the most reliable information indispensable for businesses to sustain a competitive edge. Each TMR Syndicated Research report covers a different sector - such as pharmaceuticals, chemical, energy, food & beverages, semiconductors, med-devices, consumer goods and technology. These reports provide in-depth analysis and deep segmentation to possible micro levels. With wider scope and stratified research methodology, our syndicated reports thrive to provide clients to serve their overall research requirement.

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