Rancho Cucamonga, CA, United States
Rancho Cucamonga, CA, United States

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Ongley E.D.,Basin Water | Ongley E.D.,Beijing Normal University | Xiaolan Z.,Beijing Normal University | Tao Y.,Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences
Environmental Pollution | Year: 2010

Estimates of non-point source (NPS) contribution to total water pollution in China range up to 81% for nitrogen and to 93% for phosphorus. We believe these values are too high, reflecting (a) misuse of estimation techniques that were developed in America under very different conditions and (b) lack of specificity on what is included as NPS. We compare primary methods used for NPS estimation in China with their use in America. Two observations are especially notable: empirical research is limited and does not provide an adequate basis for calibrating models nor for deriving export coefficients; the Chinese agricultural situation is so different than that of the United States that empirical data produced in America, as a basis for applying estimation techniques to rural NPS in China, often do not apply. We propose a set of national research and policy initiatives for future NPS research in China. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Chino Basin Water Conservation District is now offering a new certification for professionals interested in advancing their careers by designing, building and maintaining sustainable and water efficient landscapes. The Watershed Wise Landscape Professional (WWLP) certification training, taught by CBWCD’s partners from the Green Gardens Group (G3), is targeted toward irrigation, landscape contracting, parks and public works professionals and landscape consultants. G3 designed the certification to build a proficiency in evaluating and retrofitting irrigation systems and incorporating rainwater harvesting features into landscapes. The Watershed Wise Landscape Professional program has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense certification for irrigation system auditing. “With the ongoing drought and increasing constraints on our water supply, there is a huge demand for professionals who can help property owners reduce water use while maintaining attractive, useful, and biodiverse landscapes,” said Drew Ready, CBWCD’s Conservation Program Manager. “This training develops understanding and a skillset that will lead to significant water conservation in the urban landscape.” A certified Watershed Wise Landscape Professional or WWLP will be able to evaluate sites and manage landscapes using what is known as the “Watershed Approach.” This means treating each yard, parkway or landscape like a mini-watershed and includes building healthy soil, capturing rainwater, selecting climate-appropriate plants and using highly efficient irrigation only as needed. As part of the course, participants will learn how to conduct an irrigation audit, design a landscape using a water budget, remove turf without chemicals and build a rain garden to capture stormwater. Following completion of the course, participants interested in earning the certification will need to pass the WWLP certification exam, submit a landscape site evaluation and maintain annual continuing education unit (CEU) requirements. “Individuals who earn this certification will play a crucial role in helping to change the climate through landscapes,” said Pamela Berstler, G3 founder. “They’ll gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between plants, soil and water and learn how even small gardens can improve the health of our local ecosystems, all without sacrificing the beauty we expect in our landscapes.” The two-day, 16-hour workshop will next be offered at CBWCD’s Water Conservation Campus in Montclair on Wednesday, December 7 and Thursday, December 8, from 8 am to 5 pm each day. The California Dept. of Water Resources and the Building Industry Association of Southern California’s Baldy View Chapter contributed funding for this certification as part of their efforts to reduce outdoor water use. The course fee is $150 (a $600 value) and participants can register online. Founded in 1949, Chino Basin Water Conservation District owns and maintains groundwater recharge basins and offers water conservation education, demonstration and training programs through its Water Conservation Campus and demonstration garden. Chino Basin Water Conservation District’s state-of-the-art facility and garden are a hub for community members interested in learning how to conserve water. Every month, the district offers landscape and irrigation workshops – many of them free – for beginners and professionals alike interested in reducing water use and creating sustainable, climate-appropriate outdoor spaces. The district’s workshop and event schedule is available online.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

ANAHEIM, CA--(Marketwired - December 01, 2016) - The Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) today presented its Huell Howser Best in Blue Award to the Joshua Basin Water District for its innovative outreach program encouraging the public to plant water-saving native plants. The award was presented during the annual ACWA Fall Conference & Exhibition in Anaheim, where more than 1,600 local water officials are gathered through Friday for programs and panel discussions on California's critical water issues. Joshua Basin Water District was among six finalists for the award that honors stellar communications and outreach programs developed and run by California water agencies. "Joshua Basin Water District's creative and collaborative campaign to educate the public about the water savings inherent in native plants is a stellar example of the many local programs being offered by water agencies throughout the state to help California survive this multi-year drought," said ACWA President Kathy Tiegs. "The district reached out to partners throughout its community to collaborate on an educational and results-driven program to `Save Water…Grow Native.'" Other finalists for this year's award were: ACWA is a statewide association of public agencies whose 430+ members are responsible for about 90% of the water delivered in California. For more information, visit www.acwa.com


Trademark
Basin Water, Washington County Water Conservancy District, Central Utah Water Conservancy District and Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District | Date: 2016-07-01

Downloadable electronic newsletters in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues. Printed materials, namely, newsletters in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues. Promoting public awareness and providing information in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues. Utility services, namely, providing, supplying and distributing water. Educational services, namely, classes, workshops, seminars, demonstrations, water-usage checks, and educational consultation in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental.


Trademark
Basin Water, Washington County Water Conservancy District, Central Utah Water Conservancy District and Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District | Date: 2016-07-01

Downloadable electronic newsletters in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues. Printed materials, namely, newsletters in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues. Promoting public awareness and providing information in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues. Utility services, namely, providing, supplying and distributing water. Educational services, namely, classes, workshops, seminars, demonstrations, water-usage checks, and educational consultation in the fields of water supply, water treatment, water use, the efficient use of water, water preservation, water conservation, and related environmental issues.


News Article | August 23, 2016
Site: www.sej.org

"A group of mayors from Canada and the U.S. is trying to challenge a recent decision allowing an American city to draw water from the Great Lakes, arguing that it sets a dangerous precedent. The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative asked Monday for a hearing with the group of eight states that make up what's known as the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Council. In June, the council gave the Wisconsin city of Waukesha the green light to divert water from Lake Michigan, making it the first exception to an agreement banning diversions of water away from the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin." The Canadian Press had the story August 22, 2016.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Inland Empire – Researchers and water conservation specialists from the Chino Basin Water Conservation District and University of California Cooperative Extension have partnered on a study to identify climate-appropriate shade trees that both conserve water and thrive in a hotter and drier Inland Empire. They hope to learn more about which trees are best for the region and its changing climate. In total, the team planted 28 trees alongside the District’s groundwater retention site known as the “Montclair 4 Basin” behind its popular Water Conservation Campus in Montclair. The trees planted for the study include desert museum palo verde, the maverick mesquite, red push pistache, and the bubba desert willow. Frankie Sotomayor, CBWCD Facilities Manager, provided the trees and installation of the irrigation system for the study. “We’ve planted many great low-water trees in the demonstration landscapes adjacent to our percolation basins, but with an ongoing drought and record high temperatures, we have been asking if there are trees better suited for our changing climate. This project will help provide answers to that question so that we can continue to demonstrate best practices for our region,” Sotomayor said. The study will also examine the impact of organic mulch on the drought tolerance and tree health of four species of landscape trees, according to Cooperative Extension environmental horticulture advisor Janet Hartin. “CBWCD is a great partner for us in San Bernardino County. They share our mission of creating community-based educational programs about urban gardening, horticulture and the environment,” Hartin said. The Water Conservation District’s water conservation campus in Montclair is not only a state-of-the-art demonstration and education facility, but also a living laboratory for environmental and horticultural science. “Research and demonstration projects like this are key to ensuring our region is on the pathway to sustainability and resiliency,” said Drew Ready, arborist and District Conservation Program Manager. “The findings of this study will result in a healthier urban forest and a greener, cooler Inland Empire. Chino Basin Water Conservation District is pleased to be a part of it.” To learn more about this and other District conservation efforts, visit the Chino Basin Water Conservation District’s website at http://www.cbwcd.org or call 909-626-2711. Better yet drop their Water Conservation Campus at 4594 San Bernardino Street in Montclair to see just how beautiful water conservation can be!


Investigations regarding the influence of design parameters in low head axial flow turbines like blade profiles, blade height and blade number for micro-hydro application continue to be inadequate, even though there is a need and potential for the application of such turbines. This inadequacy provides a good ground to make a detailed experimental study to characterize these influences. The paper presents a holistic theoretical model that attempts to bring out a functionality of the internal performance parameters of the runner and attempts to establish a physical relationship between the two design parameters (blade height and blade number) and the performance parameters. The experimental results on 3 runners showed that with an increase in the number of blades, the efficiency of the runner dropped drastically due to the change in direction of the relative flow vector at the runner exit, which decreased the net rotational momentum and increased the axial flow velocity. The decrease of blade height on the other hand decreased the overall runner loss coefficient quite drastically but this could not result in major performance gains. The study concluded that the influence of blade number is more dominating compared to that of the blade height and that choice of blade number should be carefully made. On the hydraulic level, the study found interesting effects like the slip phenomenon and loss mechanisms within the runner. The paper also looks into the possible errors within the theoretical model developed and the extent of their influence on the conclusions. The paper suggests more experimental studies to separately study the effects of blade number and blade height. It further makes a strong case to initiate a computational work to validate all the experimental findings, fill the gaps in the theoretical model and use it as an optimization and standardization tool for axial flow turbines in the specialized application of micro-hydro. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Singh P.,Basin Water | Nestmann F.,Basin Water
Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science | Year: 2010

The paper presents an experimentally validated optimization routine for the turbine-mode operation of radial flow centrifugal pumps. The optimization routine outlined here is designed to be used with prediction (predicting turbine mode characteristics of a pump) and selection (selecting the most appropriate pump for turbine-mode operation) models. The optimization routine improves upon previous uncertainties in prediction, especially in the low specific speed range. The optimization routine is evaluated experimentally for three pumps with specific speeds of 18.2 rpm, 19.7 rpm and 44.7 rpm, and a significant improvement in the accuracy of the turbine predictions with the errors for all the three pumps falling within the ±4% acceptance bands in the full load operating region is found. It is also shown how the optimization routine validates an approach to selection and prediction based on model experiments and classical principles of applied turbomachinery (specific speed-specific diameter or the Cordier/Balje plots). Such an approach is shown to be the most economic in terms of pump mode input variables. The paper recommends the extensive use of the optimization routine in micro hydro and other energy recovery projects involving pumps as turbines and the creation of a database of accurate field results that can be used to improve the routine further. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


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