Basil Hetzel Institute for Medical Research

Adelaide, Australia

Basil Hetzel Institute for Medical Research

Adelaide, Australia
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Cummins A.G.,Basil Hetzel Institute for Medical Research | Cummins A.G.,Queen Elizabeth Hospital | Alexander B.G.,Queen Elizabeth Hospital | Chung A.,Queen Elizabeth Hospital | And 8 more authors.
American Journal of Gastroenterology | Year: 2011

Objectives: The Marsh classification is a semiquantitative method for the diagnosis and monitoring of changes in duodenal biopsies in celiac disease. We have explored the possibility that quantitative changes in villous area and crypt length (morphometry) may provide better information on changes in duodenal morphology, particularly after the introduction of a gluten-free diet. Methods: We measured villous height, apical and basal villous widths, and crypt length in 57 adults with celiac disease and 83 control subjects. Villous area was calculated as a trapezoid approximation. Serial changes in villous area and crypt length were determined at regular intervals for up to 4 years after the introduction of a gluten-free diet. Morphometric changes were also correlated with Marsh grade, self-reported adherence to a gluten-free diet, and changes in celiac serology. Results: The gluten-free diet resulted in a progressive increase in villous area and a progressive decrease in crypt length. Morphometric improvement reached a plateau after 6-12 months with mean villous area attaining a value approximately half that of control subjects. Morphometric data were more sensitive than Marsh grade. Improvement in morphometric indices was significantly associated with the disappearance of anti-endomysial IgA antibody but not with dietary compliance. Conclusions: Morphometry is a sensitive way to document changes in duodenal biopsies in celiac disease. In adults treated with a gluten-free diet, it is uncommon for villous area to return to values observed in control subjects, but morphometric improvement is associated with the disappearance of anti-endomysial IgA antibody. © 2011 by the American College of Gastroenterology.


Ng J.,University of Adelaide | Ng J.,Basil Hetzel Institute for Medical Research | Kidd S.P.,University of Adelaide
International Journal of Medical Microbiology | Year: 2013

Of the known proteins which use nickel as a co-factor, Haemophilus influenzae contains only urease and glyoxalase I (gloA). We have recently reported that this pathogen harbours a unique nickel uptake system (nikKLMQO-nimR). Unusually, the disruption of the nickel uptake system (nikQ or nimR mutants) resulted in cells that aggregated and formed an increased biofilm compared to the wild type cells. Using a gloA mutant strain and urease-specific inhibitor we showed that this phenotype is not due to the loss-of-function of these enzymes. By generating H. influenzae " resting cells" which are enzymatically inactive but maintain their structural integrity we have shown that the cell aggregation in the nikQ/. nimR mutants is not due to the loss of enzymatic function. The nikQ mutant was unable to accumulate nickel but the addition of excess nickel did restore intracellular nickel levels and this resulted in the nikQ mutant returning to the wild type " free-living" phenotype; cells with no aggregation and no biofilm formation. We used a range of techniques which showed that the nikQ mutant possesses changes to its cell surface properties. The mutant was more negatively charged than wild type cells as well as being more hydrophobic. Analysis of the outer membrane constituents showed that there were molecular differences. Although the nikQ mutant appears to grow the same as its wild type cell we have shown that there is a change in the " lifestyle" of these nickel limited cells and this induces changes to the surface of the cell to promote cell-cell aggregation and biofilm formation. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH.


PubMed | Basil Hetzel Institute for Medical Research
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: The American journal of gastroenterology | Year: 2011

The Marsh classification is a semiquantitative method for the diagnosis and monitoring of changes in duodenal biopsies in celiac disease. We have explored the possibility that quantitative changes in villous area and crypt length (morphometry) may provide better information on changes in duodenal morphology, particularly after the introduction of a gluten-free diet.We measured villous height, apical and basal villous widths, and crypt length in 57 adults with celiac disease and 83 control subjects. Villous area was calculated as a trapezoid approximation. Serial changes in villous area and crypt length were determined at regular intervals for up to 4 years after the introduction of a gluten-free diet. Morphometric changes were also correlated with Marsh grade, self-reported adherence to a gluten-free diet, and changes in celiac serology.The gluten-free diet resulted in a progressive increase in villous area and a progressive decrease in crypt length. Morphometric improvement reached a plateau after 6-12 months with mean villous area attaining a value approximately half that of control subjects. Morphometric data were more sensitive than Marsh grade. Improvement in morphometric indices was significantly associated with the disappearance of anti-endomysial IgA antibody but not with dietary compliance.Morphometry is a sensitive way to document changes in duodenal biopsies in celiac disease. In adults treated with a gluten-free diet, it is uncommon for villous area to return to values observed in control subjects, but morphometric improvement is associated with the disappearance of anti-endomysial IgA antibody.

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