Cambridge, MA, United States
Cambridge, MA, United States

Basho Technologies is a distributed systems company that develops a key-value NoSQL database technology, Riak, and an object storage system that is built on the Riak platform, called Riak CS. Wikipedia.


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News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Larger team added to meet increasing demand for mobile performance management in Germany, Austria and Switzerland SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - Dec 7, 2016) - NetMotion Software, a leading provider of Mobile Performance Management (MPM) software, today announced key new hires to expand its presence and coverage to meet the increasing demand for its solutions in Central Europe. The company and its growing network of certified partners will enable enterprises, utilities, government and public safety organizations in Germany, Austria and Switzerland to enhance operational efficiency, increase end-user productivity and strengthen the security of business critical mobile applications. Juergen Bemmerl, previously with PulseSecure and ForeScout Technology, has been appointed Country Manager for Central and Eastern Europe. Carsten Poppe, previously with PulseSecure and Infoblox, is Systems Engineer and Konrad Pacula, previously with Basho Technologies and CommVault, is Sales Development for DACH. "I am excited to lead our efforts in the DACH region," said Mr. Bemmerl. "NetMotion's software helps businesses deliver reliable connectivity to all users, makes business-critical applications more accessible and improves overall productivity." "We've built a strong team to expand our presence in Central Europe," added Erik Helms, Vice President of Sales for EMEA and APAC at NetMotion. "With local veteran security and mobility sales leadership and highly invested channel partners, our mobility and security solutions can help DACH enterprises and government organizations that adopted mobility programs realize the full potential of their technology and service investments." "Whilst businesses all over the world, as part of their digital transformation initiatives, are seeking the productivity gains and competitive advantages that the strategic use of mobile technology delivers, German firms stand out in their network and security requirements to support these efforts," said Nick McQuire, Vice President Enterprise Research, CCS Insight, a European-based analyst firm. "We are seeing growing demand in the Germany, Austria and Switzerland region for mobile solutions that improve performance and security as a result." About NetMotion Software NetMotion Mobile Performance Management software delivers an unparalleled mobile user experience and increases operational efficiency and end-user productivity. Thousands of enterprises around the world depend on the company's solutions to deliver traffic optimization, adaptive policies, performance analytics and diagnostics, and security for their mobile workforces. NetMotion has received numerous awards for its technology and customer support. The company consistently receives an impressive customer satisfaction Net Promoter Score (NPS) of 91, significantly exceeding NPS averages in the technology and telecom industries. The company is headquartered in Seattle, Washington. Visit www.netmotionsoftware.com. NetMotion and NetMotion Mobility are registered trademarks of NetMotion Wireless, Inc. All other trade names, trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.1.2 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2013

The goal of SyncFree is to enable large-scale distributed applications without global synchronisation, by exploiting the recent concept of Conflict-free Replicated Data Types (CRDTs). CRDTs allow unsynchronised concurrent updates, yet ensure data consistency. This revolutionary approach maximises responsiveness and availability; it enables locating data near its users, in decentralised clouds.\n\nGlobal-scale applications, such as virtual wallets, advertising platforms, social networks, online games, or collaboration networks, require consistency across distributed data items. As networked users, objects, devices, and sensors proliferate, the consistency issue is increasingly acute for the software industry. Current alternatives are both unsatisfactory: either to rely on synchronisation to ensure strong consistency, or to forfeit synchronisation and consistency altogether with ad-hoc eventual consistency. The former approach does not scale beyond a single data centre and is expensive. The latter is extremely difficult to understand, and remains error-prone, even for highly-skilled programmers.\n\nSyncFree avoids both global synchronisation and the complexities of ad-hoc eventual consistency by leveraging the formal properties of CRDTs. CRDTs are designed so that unsynchronised concurrent updates do not conflict and have well-defined semantics. By combining CRDT objects from a standard library of proven datatypes (counters, sets, graphs, sequences, etc.), large-scale distributed programming is simpler and less error-prone. CRDTs are a practical and cost-effective approach.\n\nThe SyncFree project will develop both theoretical and practical understanding of large-scale synchronisation-free programming based on CRDTs. Project results will be new industrial applications, new application architectures, large-scale evaluation of both, programming models and algorithms for large-scale applications, and advanced scientific understanding.


Fink B.,Basho Technologies
Erlang'12 - Proceedings of the ACM SIGPLAN Erlang Workshop | Year: 2012

The Dynamo model, as described by Amazon in 2007, has become a popular concept in the development of distributed storage systems. The model accounts for only CRUD operations, however. This paper describes a system called Riak Pipe that enables the use of generic functions in place of CRUD operations. This allows Dynamo-model users to exploit other resources, such as CPU time, available in their cluster, as well as to gain the efficiencies offered by data-local processing. © 2012 ACM.


Meiklejohn C.,Basho Technologies
Proceedings of the ACM SIGPLAN International Conference on Functional Programming, ICFP | Year: 2013

We present Riak PG, a new Erlang process group registry for highly-available applications. The Riak PG system is a Dynamo-based, distributed, fault-tolerant, named process group registry for use as an alternative to the built-in Erlang process group facility, pg2, and the globally distributed extended process registry, gproc. Riak PG aims to provide a highly-available, fault-tolerant, distributed registry by sacrificing strong consistency for eventual consistency in applications where availability of the registry is paramount to application function and performance.


Meiklejohn C.,Basho Technologies
Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on the Principles and Practice of Eventual Consistency, PaPEC 2014 | Year: 2014

The Riak DT library [2] provides a composable, convergent replicated dictionary called the Riak DT map, designed for use in the Riak [1] replicated data store. This data type provides the ability for the composition of conflict-free replicated data types (CRDT) [7] through embedding. Composition by embedding works well when the total object size of the composed CRDTs is small, however suffers a performance penalty as object size increases. The root of this problem is based in how replication is achieved in the Riak data store using Erlang distribution. [4] We propose a solution for providing an alternative composition mechanism, composition by reference, which provides support for arbitrarily large objects while ensuring predictable performance and high availability. We explore the use of this new composition mechanism by examining a common use case for the Riak data store. Copyright © 2007 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.


Basho Technologies Riak Cloud Storage (Riak CS) now can be replicated across multiple data centers.The new capability, combined with its existing AWS S3 compatibility, gives a potent boost to the fast growing distributed storage service. Replication with Riak CS means that a customer can spread their stored data across multiple data centers around the globe and on AWS infrastructure with the guarantee of high availability. Customers get the assurance that they can avoid disruptions from datacenter outages and also serve content fast to multiple geographic regions. In essence, they get all the benefits of AWS and the ability to replicate the stored data to any data center of their choosing. This reduces the risk of using AWS and allows customers to store their data in their own data centers, on their own terms. According to Basho, the new replication service breaks large data objects into small blocks that are streamed to the underlying Riak cluster where replicated for high availability. A manifest for each object is maintained so that blocks can be retrieved from the cluster and the full object presented to clients. For multi-site replication in Riak CS, global information for users, bucket information and manifests are streamed in real-time from a primary implementation to a secondary site so global state is maintained across locations. Objects can then be replicated in either full sync or real-time sync mode. Basho launched Riak CS last year. It is built on Riak, the open-source, distributed NoSQL database. Earlier this year, Basho made Riak CS  compatible with Amazon S3.  With the compatibility, customers  get access to S3 tools and frameworks. They can also import and extract Amazon data. When immersed in the swirl of conferences like AWS re:Invent, the sense of what is hype and what is not gets quite muddled. But it’s companies like Basho that show despite AWS clear dominance, it still is a market with a fast emerging field of innovators that can disrupt the disruptors. They point to a still very young market and a race that has just begun.


News Article | May 4, 2014
Site: www.datanami.com

The simplicity and scalability of a key-value storage architecture has served Basho Technologies well so far. The company behind the open source Riak NoSQL database counts close to 200 customers, including blue chips like Best Buy and AT&T. But moving forward, the company’s new leaders are looking to aggressively augment that key-value base with more sophisticated data storage engines, such as document stores and graph databases, as they take the company to the next level. Less than two months ago, Basho announced the hiring of Adam Wray, a 20-year industry veteran who spent time at Akamai, to be its new CEO. Wray immediately brought Dave McCrory, another tech vet whom Wray had worked with previously at Warner, to be the new CTO. Last week, while speeding along a Colorado highway enroute to another client site as part of a customer engagement tour, Wray and McCrory spoke with Datanami about the future of Riak, the adoption of NoSQL databases in the enterprise, and what Basho wants to be when it grows up. “We were brought in specifically because–while the company has an illustrious history from engineering point of view–we have not executed successfully, or really thought through, from an operational point of view, how to answer simple questions, like what does Basho want to be when it grows up?” Basho’s CEO Wray says. “I was engaged by one of the original technical co-founders, and eventually brought on board, and brought Dave and several others with me, to help take the company to the next level.” Riak is a well-known entity among technologists as a dependable key-value store. The database, which is based largely on Amazon’s Dynamo paper, was written in Erlang, and includes libraries for most popular languages. A technology preview of Riak version 2 introduced last October brought strong consistency enhancements, as well as integration with the Solr search engine. Riding atop a key value store gives Riak a stronger foundation than other NoSQL databases, claims CTO McCrory. “If you compare us to a lot of the other NoSQL distributed data storage solutions that are out there, we are very strong in the scale out, high-reliability, and easy-to-maintain [areas]. Those are our core strengths,” he says. “What makes Riak such a great story is the fact that it’s based off of a key value store.” A key-value store is just about the simplest way to store and organize data, besides a barebones file system. That “keep it simple” approach resonates with d evelopers, McCrory says. “For developers today who are trying to write for distributed systems, the more complex the construct that you’re writing to, the harder it is to write to that construct,” he says. “So when trying to deal with some applications, sometimes just a simple key value store is the right and easiest answer.” The company is currently in the planning stages of rolling out the next phase of Riak’s life, which will transition the NoSQL database into a “data platform.” That plan involves adding new engines to sit atop the key-value store. “Our goal is to provide you with 80 percent of the constructs you need,” McCrory says. “It could be document store on top. It could be graph. It could be time-series. It could be queuing. It could be caching. If you can think of a construct that’s used to day by the modern Web scaling cloud providers, that’s [what we’re looking at]. We’re just not 100 percent sure yet what we’re going to do next.” That’s why McCrory and Wray are traveling around the country and meeting with clients–to figure out where to take Riak next. Later this summer, the company is expected to announce which additional engines it will add to the key-value store base. It’s possible the company will add multiple engines, but it wants to rank them in order of priority. Retaining the elegant simplicity of a key value store while building more sophisticated data management constructs on top of it will be a development challenge that Basho’s engineers will dig into heartily. The rewards for building such an extensible data platform are large. The challenge for Basho is to extend Riak to handle more sophisticated application challenges, without getting too far away from its key-value store roots. “There is no one magic solution today that you can select as an enterprise that will meet all your needs. That’s true of anyone’s product,” McCrory says. “If you try and use a single one, you end up having to do all sorts of unnatural acts to make it effective.” Keeping the Riak data platform grounded in the key-value store world will give Basho an advantage over competitors, the CTO says. “Many of our competitors have chosen other things as their core constructs, and I think that’s going to expose weaknesses over time,” he says “You can’t make everything look like a document or a column and solve the majority of problems. You can solve classes of problems, but not all of them. And I think that’s going to end up being a problem in the long run for our competitors.” As Wray sees it, there is plenty of time for NoSQL database vendors to differentiate themselves and grab market share. “I feel we’re not even in the first inning in regards to what the real market potential is,” Wray says. “So somebody who comes out strong out of the gates with a large valuation and hype and noise–the reality is, the difference between my revenues and MongoDB‘s is very little. They just have more hype and larger valuation.” When it comes to customer engagements, Basho is more often shortlisted beside DataStax, the company behind the Cassandra document-store. When it comes to scaling into the petabyte realm, Wray claims that Riak has an advantage. “You see document stores break down pretty aggressively when you start do to terabytes or hundreds of terabytes of data, let alone much larger than that,” he says. “The operational overhead to shard and handle the support is massive. That’s where we win out.” These are early, heady days in the NoSQL database market, to be sure. There is a lot of hooting and hollering, and the noise level only seems to increase as more enterprise dollars start flowing into the space. Basho certainly has its hands full as it seeks to go up against larger, well-known, and better capitalized vendors. But the five-year-old company is no newbie when it comes to developing software. If Wray and McCrory can succeed in building new engines for Riak while simultaneously changing the perception of the product as something that only hard-core technologists use, then Basho could become a bigger force in the market. Why Can’t This Big Data CEO Get Any Respect? Hadoop and NoSQL Now Data Warehouse-Worthy: GartnerNoSQL Databases RAM it Home with In-Memory Speedups


News Article | April 22, 2014
Site: www.techworld.com

The large-scale move by commercial and government organizations around the world to put services online is creating a widespread need for highly available IT platforms, such as databases, to support those services. This IDC Technology Spotlight looks at the developing need for highly available databases, and the requirements they need to satisfy. It also looks at the role of Basho Technologies' Riak product in this increasingly important market.


News Article | August 24, 2015
Site: www.eweek.com

Apple says that its iPhone 6s line is off to a historic start, and ...


News Article | September 9, 2014
Site: www.techweekeurope.co.uk

The NHS Spine is used by more than 20,000 organisations that provide health care across England The electronic backbone of the NHS, Spine, has been rebuilt to harness new technology, including Basho Technologies’ distributed database, Riak Enterprise Spine is used by more than 20,000 organisations that provide health care across England, including primary and secondary care sites, pharmacies, opticians and dentists. Riak, an open source distributed database, is key to providing the reliability and scalability for the platform to drive efficiency and improve patient care. The NHS’ move to revamp the Spine, in a major project led by England’s Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC), was driven by the need for a scalable, resilient and flexible system that would also result in cost-savings for the organisation. With these requirements in mind, the NHS selected Riak Enterprise, the commercial version of Basho’s distributed open source NoSQL database, to support the transition and implementation of the new Spine. Basho and the HSCIC collaborated throughout to ensure the technical knowledge of both organisations was reflected in enhancements to Riak and the wider project itself. Riak has been tested thoroughly over the past year and will also expected to allow the NHS to update the Spine seamlessly, removing interruptions which could adversely affect NHS employees and patients. The transition was finalised over the weekend of August 22, 2014, with the infrastructure undergoing a 45-day period of intensive monitoring to ensure that it is performing as expected. Adam Wray, CEO at Basho Technologies., said: “The improvement of patient care is of the utmost importance in the healthcare industry. As data, such as patient records, prescriptions and all other medical information becomes digitised, it is vital that government health organisations can adapt and provide constant, reliable access to this information.” Stuart McCaul, Managing Director, EMEA at Basho Technologies, said: “The information stored on the Spine is potentially life-saving, and so users must be able to quickly access the data they require without delay or complication. Riak has previously been adopted by other healthcare services outside of the UK, such as The Danish Health and Medical Authority, and it provides the Spine with resiliency and predictable scalability while also saving the NHS both time and costs, contributing to the improvement of patient care in England.”

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