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BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Kyruus, a leader in provider search and scheduling solutions for health systems, announced today that the University of Miami Health System (“UHealth”) has selected the company’s patient access applications to enhance patient experience across multiple points of access. The only South Florida-based academic medical center will utilize ProviderMatch for Access Centers, ProviderMatch for Consumers and the KyruusOne provider data management platform to help patients easily find the right providers based on their clinical needs and logistical preferences. UHealth sought a comprehensive solution that would enable it to offer a truly differentiated patient experience. They also prioritized a solution that could provide consistency for patients looking for providers both on the UHealth website or when calling into its access center. Kyruus was unique in its ability to deploy the same patient-provider matching technology at both entry points. ProviderMatch will also accommodate searches in both English and Spanish, a critical need given the health system’s diverse patient population. “At the University of Miami Health System, we know that delivering an exceptional patient experience is essential to stand out in a competitive market. That experience begins with the first interaction a patient has with us,” said Roymi V. Membiela, Chief Experience Officer and Associate VP of Marketing & Communications at UHealth. “As such, it’s critical for us to identify the most appropriate provider quickly and easily, based on the needs of each patient - a key reason we chose Kyruus’ multi-channel solution.” UHealth will also leverage the KyruusOne provider data management platform to unify provider data into a centralized directory and ensure patients and call center agents have access to detailed, consistent, and up-to-date provider profiles. “With the 15,000-term Kyruus Clinical Library, our providers can configure extremely detailed profiles, making it significantly easier for patients and agents to make more clinically-appropriate matches,” said Dr. Thinh Tran, Chief Clinical Officer & Chief Operating Officer at UHealth. “We’re committed to ensuring our patients can find the right providers for their needs and that providers, in turn, can see the patients requiring their specific clinical focus area.” “Patient access doesn’t belong to a single department – it’s an enterprise-wide challenge,” said Graham Gardner, CEO of Kyruus. “UHealth recognizes the integral role access plays in a patient’s broader experience and we’re honored to work with the UHealth team to help them integrate their access center and marketing efforts to deliver a cohesive and differentiated patient experience.” About University of Miami Health System The University of Miami Health System delivers transformational patient care by the region’s most comprehensive team of doctors, powered by the groundbreaking research and medical education of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine. As South Florida’s only academic-based health care system, UHealth is a vital component of the community. UHealth combines a superior approach to patient care, with research, education and academic excellence to create a personalized health care delivery system that is unparalleled, treating patients as individuals and guiding them uniquely through their health care journey. Within the UHealth system, patients can participate in clinical trials and benefit from the latest developments that are fast-tracked from the laboratory to the bedside. UHealth’s comprehensive network includes three hospitals, more than one dozen outpatient facilities in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and Collier counties, with more than 1,200 physicians and scientists. Its flagship facility, The Lennar Foundation Medical Center, opened December 2016 in Coral Gables, marks a new era in health care delivery that brings together the expertise of Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, the University of Miami Health System Sports Medicine Institute and many other specialty services. About Kyruus Kyruus delivers proven provider search and scheduling solutions that help hospitals and health systems match patients with the providers best suited to care for them. The ProviderMatch suite of solutions—for consumers, access centers, and referral networks—enables a consistent patient experience across multiple points of access, while aligning provider supply with patient demand. The company’s proprietary provider data management platform forms the foundation of its solutions, powering them with accurate data by coupling data processing with administrative applications. To find out why a Better Match Means Better Care, visit www.kyruus.com.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

A woman in her 80s has become the first person to be successfully treated with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. A slither of laboratory-made retinal cells has protected her eyesight, fighting her age-related macular degeneration – a common form of progressive blindness. Such stem cells can be coaxed to form many other types of cell. Unlike other types of stem cell, such as those found in an embryo, induced pluripotent ones can be made from adult non-stem cells – a discovery that earned a Nobel prize in 2012. Now, more than a decade after they were created, these stem cells have helped someone. Masayo Takahashi at the RIKEN Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration in Kobe, Japan, and her team took skin cells from the woman and turned them into iPS cells. They then encouraged these to form retinal pigment epithelial cells, which are important for supporting and nourishing the retina cells that capture light for vision. The researchers made a slither of cells measuring just 1 by 3 millimetres. Before transplanting this into the woman’s eye in 2014, they first removed diseased tissue on her retina that was gradually destroying her sight. They then inserted the small patch of cells they had created, hoping they would become a part of her eye and stop her eyesight from degenerating. Now the results are in. Published today, they show that the treatment hasn’t made the woman’s vision any sharper, but it does seem to have prevented further deterioration – with her vision now stable for more than two years. Since the graft, the woman says her vision is “brighter”. “Takahashi and her team have done incredible work, and deserve all the praise they get for this project,” says Shinya Yamanaka, director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application at Kyoto University, who won the Nobel prize for inventing iPS cells and collaborated on this work. “This is a landmark study and opens the door to similar treatments for many diseases,” he says. “This first iPSC-derived retinal graft is an important landmark in the field of retinal regeneration,” says James Bainbridge at University College London, and head of a trial at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London of similar grafts made instead from human embryonic stem cells. One worry about this approach is that turning the stem cells into new tissues could lead to cancer-causing genetic mutations – though the team found no evidence of this in the treated woman. However, a trial of the technique in another person was cancelled in 2015, after tests revealed that the cells intended to be given to the man had developed genetic abnormalities. But although it has taken many years to bring proven stem cell therapies to the clinic, many private centres around the world have been advertising unregulated treatments purporting to use stem cells for some time. A second study published today shows just how badly some unregulated treatments described as stem cell therapies can go wrong. Three case reports of women given such treatments for age-related macular degeneration detail how one woman went blind and the vision of the other two became much worse. All three ended up seeking emergency treatment in 2015, after each paid $5000 to a private clinic to receive injections of their own fatty tissue into their eyes. “Patients and physicians in the US should be made aware that not all ‘stem cell’ clinics are safe, and that ‘stem therapy’ as provided in private clinics in the US is unproven and potentially harmful,” says Thomas Albini at the University of Miami’s Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Florida, who subsequently treated two of the women. Albini advises people to be suspicious of any procedure involving payment. “Most legitimate research in the US does not require patients to pay for the experimental procedures,” he says, adding that people should check whether a trial has been registered with the US Food and Drug Administration. “Be aware that if it sounds too good to be true, it may indeed not be true.” Read more: Clinic claims it has used stem cells to treat Down’s syndrome


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Durante a carreira de três décadas do Dr. Lansingh, ele trabalhou para reduzir a cegueira e restaurar a visão pelo mundo. Entre 2004 e 2015, ele serviu a Agência Internacional para a Prevenção da Cegueira (IAPB -- International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness), como coordenador regional para a América Latina. Em 2016, ele aceitou o cargo de diretor de Advocacy do Conselho Internacional de Oftalmologia (ICO -- International Council of Ophthalmology). A partir de 2015, o Dr. Lansingh se associou à campanha da HelpMeSee para eliminar a cegueira causada por catarata, assumindo o cargo de CMO para a América Latina, onde ele foi distinguido recentemente com o "Prêmio Internacional de Prevenção da Cegueira" (International Blindness Prevention Award), concedido pela Academia Americana de Oftalmologia (AAO -- American Academy of Ophthalmology). Ao agradecer a PAAO pela distinção, o Dr. Lansingh disse: "Para mim, isso reflete um espírito verdadeiro de cooperação e educação. Eu trabalho em diversas frentes, principalmente como CMO da HelpMeSee e também com a IAPB e com o ICO, como diretor de Proteção, assim como sou membro do conselho de diversas organizações de oftalmologia. Meu esforço é o de fazer muitas organizações trabalharem juntas para um objetivo comum: tornar a cegueira uma coisa do passado". Ao anunciar o prêmio, o presidente e chairman do Bascom Palmer Eye Institute da Universidade de Miami, Eduardo C. Alfonso, disse: "O Prêmio Humanitário Benjamin F. Boyd não poderia ter sido destinado a uma pessoa mais merecedora. O Dr. Lansingh dedicou sua vida ao serviço comunitário, prevenção de programas para a cegueira e outras atividades humanitárias. A família Bascom Palmer se sente extremamente orgulhosa do Dr. Lansingh, onde ele serve como professor adjunto voluntário de oftalmologia". O presidente e CEO da HelpMeSee, Jacob Mohan Thazhathu, declarou: "O trabalho e realizações do Dr. Lansingh em prevenção e eliminação da cegueira promoveu significativamente a educação, o treinamento, a oftalmologia comunitária e o suporte de políticas públicas. Aplaudimos a PAAO pelo reconhecimento bem merecido do Dr. Van Lansingh e de nossa missão comum de terminar com a cegueira causada pela catarata". Mais recentemente, o Dr. Lansingh concluiu uma campanha da HelpMeSee para eliminar a catarata infantil no Peru, em parceria com o Instituto Damos Vision (IDV) e suporte da USAID, como parte do Programa da Cegueira Infantil (www.usaid.gov/childblindness), que se destina a fazer a triagem da catarata infantil e restaurar a visão das crianças. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dr-lansingh-recebe-o-premio-humanitario-benjamin-f-boyd-de-2017-da-paao-300448914.html


MIAMI--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cirle, Inc., a Miami-based medical technology incubator, today announced that it will unveil its latest three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System (SNS 200) at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS) meeting in Los Angeles, California, May 4-8. The investigational system, for which Cirle is completing U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) registration, will be on display at the Cirle booth (#1261). “The SNS 200 is truly a next generation platform for 3-D intraoperative navigation during cataract surgery, incorporating everything we learned about surgeon needs, design priorities, systems integration, and commercial-scale manufacturing through the development and registration process of the original SNS,” said Richard Awdeh, M.D., a professor at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Founder of Cirle. “The second-generation version meets all the requirements for performance and procedure optimization that we established in our first model. As a cataract surgeon, I am excited about the potential of the SNS 200 to enhance the efficiency and precision of the procedure.” The Cirle Navigation System (SNS) is an ophthalmic image communications device which performs annotation of the source image data provided by compatible surgical microscopes. The SNS 200 incorporates smart work flow automation that increases efficiency throughout the surgery. New features of the system include: Cirle continues to focus its research programs on applications of technology and data science to improve outcomes in cataract surgery. Clinical studies designed to further characterize the advantages and importance of surgical guidance in cataract surgery are currently underway in the United States. About Cirle Established in 2010, Cirle is a medical technology incubator based in at the University of Miami Life Science and Technology Park in Miami, Fla. The company focuses on the use of translational medical research and innovative technologies to cure diseases that lead to blindness. It develops and acquires early-stage technologies, applies its specialized capabilities to refine and test them, and pursues industry collaborations to bring the technologies to market. Offering a highly interactive environment for inter-disciplinary innovation, Cirle has engaged leading eye health experts, engineers and researchers in its development projects. For more information, visit www.cirle.com.


Browning D.J.,NC Associates | Kaiser P.K.,Cleveland Clinic | Rosenfeld P.J.,Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
American Journal of Ophthalmology | Year: 2012

• PURPOSE: To describe the pharmacokinetics, preclinical studies, and clinical trials of the newly approved anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drug aflibercept (Eylea (VEGF Trap-Eye); Regeneron; and Bayer). • DESIGN: Review with editorial commentary. • METHODS: A review of the medical literature and pertinent Internet postings combined with analysis of key studies with expert opinion regarding the use of aflibercept for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. • RESULTS: Aflibercept, a fusion protein with binding domains from native VEGF receptors, binds VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factors 1 and 2 with high affinity. Preclinical ophthalmologic studies demonstrated that aflibercept suppresses choroidal neovascularization in several animal models. The results of phase 1 and 2 trials showed excellent short-term suppression of choroidal neovascularization in patients with exudative agerelated macular degeneration and suggested a longer durability of aflibercept compared with other anti-VEGF drugs. The pivotal phase 3 Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Trap-Eye: Investigation of Efficacy and Safety in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration 1 and 2 trials showed that monthly and bimonthly aflibercept were noninferior to monthly ranibizumab at preventing vision loss (< 15-letter loss) with comparable vision gains and safety. Year 2 treatment involved monthly pro re nata injections with required injections every 3 months and maintained vision gains from the first year, with an average of 4.2 injections of aflibercept and 4.7 injections of ranibizumab. • CONCLUSIONS: Aflibercept promises to deliver excellent visual outcomes for exudative age-related macular degeneration patients while undergoing fewer injections compared with ranibizumab. With a wholesale cost of $1850 per dose, the cost per patient with aflibercept treatment promises to be lower than with ranibizumab. © 2012 by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BOSTON, MA, February 21, 2017-- Bascom Palmer Eye Institute has installed the Ceeable Visual Field Analyzer (CVFA) digital health technology. Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is a world class teaching and research institution for ophthalmology. CVFA was designed to offer caregivers the ability to perform visual field testing of patients in non-traditional test locations such as, primary clinics, geriatric clinics, and adult care centers.The CVFA is a cloud-based digital platform for the detection and characterization of visual field distortions due to retinal disease, which includes patients with AMD and diabetic retinopathy. Moreover, CVFA allows monitoring progression of diseases affecting vision. The CVFA will deliver rapid, accurate and low-cost visual field testing to patient populations that may not have access to traditional vision testing services."We have selected the Ceeable system to deliver visual field testing technology to a large portion of the patient population who are unable to access care at traditional test locations," says Dr. Delia DeBuc, research associate professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. CVFA will be used in a clinical research study sponsored by the Finker Frenkel Legacy Foundation, Inc. The study is investigating retinal features that have been associated with cognitive decline and brain alternations in relation to aging and brain abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.CVFA has successfully tested thousands of patients in the United States and across the globe, delivering and enabling much-needed efficient and effective eye care services to a diverse patient population.Bascom Palmer Eye Institute is ranked the nation's best in ophthalmology by U.S. News & World Report, for 12 consecutive years. The Institute serves as the Department of Ophthalmology for the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, www.bascompalmer.org About CeeableCeeable, Inc. is a leader in digital mobile health for ophthalmology. The Ceeable Visual Field Analyzer (CVFA) is cloud-based digital platform used to detect and diagnose retinal disease. There are more than 300 million people worldwide that suffer from retinal disease. The Ceeable technology can reach more people worldwide than any currently available retinal diagnostic technology. Better patient management of eye disease will reduce healthcare costs and help prevent blindness, www.ceeable.com


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

BAR HARBOR, ME--(Marketwired - February 16, 2017) - In mice genetically predisposed to glaucoma, vitamin B added to drinking water is effective at preventing the disease, a research team led by Jackson Laboratory Professor and Howard Hughes Medical Investigator Simon W.M. John reports in the journal Science. Glaucoma is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, affecting an estimated 80 million people worldwide. In most glaucoma patients, harmfully high pressure inside the eye or intraocular pressure leads to the progressive dysfunction and loss of retinal ganglion cells. Retinal ganglion cells are the neuronal cells that connect the eye to the brain via the optic nerve. Increasing age is a key risk factor for glaucoma, contributing to both harmful elevation of intraocular pressure and increased neuronal vulnerability to pressure-induced damage. The vitamin administration was surprisingly effective, eliminating the vast majority of age-related molecular changes and providing a remarkably robust protection against glaucoma. It offers promise for developing inexpensive and safe treatments for glaucoma patients. "We wanted to identify key age-related susceptibility factors that change with age in the eye," John says, "and that therefore increase vulnerability to disease and in particular neuronal disease." By understanding general age-related mechanism, there is the potential to develop new interventions to generally protect from common age-related disease processes in many people. Conducting a variety of genomic, metabolic, neurobiological and other tests in mice susceptible to inherited glaucoma, compared to control mice, the researchers discovered that NAD, a molecule vital to energy metabolism in neurons and other cells, declines with age. "There's an analogy with an old motorbike," John says. "It runs just fine, but little things get less reliable with age. One day you stress it: you drive it up a steep hill or you go on really long journey and you get in trouble. It's less reliable than a new bike and it's going to fail with a higher frequency than that new bike." The decrease in NAD levels reduces the reliability of neurons' energy metabolism, especially under stress such as increased intraocular pressure. "Like taking that big hill on your old bike, some things are going to fail more often," John says. "The amount of failure will increase over time, resulting in more damage and disease progression." In essence, the treatments of vitamin B (nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B , also called niacinamide) boosted the metabolic reliability of aging retinal ganglion cells, keeping them healthier for longer. "Because these cells are still healthy, and still metabolically robust," says JAX Postdoctoral Associate Pete Williams, first author of the study, "even when high intraocular pressure turns on, they better resist damaging processes." The researchers also found that a single gene-therapy application of Nmnat1 (the gene for an enzyme that makes NAD from nicotinamide) prevented glaucoma from developing in this mouse model. "It can be a problem for patients, especially the elderly, to take their drugs every day and in the correct dose," Williams says. "So gene therapy could be a one-shot, protective treatment." He notes that gene therapies, through injections into the eye, have been approved for a handful of very rare, human genetic eye disorders, and their demonstration of an important age-dependent factor may enable gene therapy for more common eye disease. John says that the team is pursuing clinical partnerships to begin the process of testing the effectiveness of vitamin B treatment in glaucoma patients. They are also exploring potential applications for the treatment in other diseases involving neurodegeneration. Collaborating with the John lab was Vittorio Porciatti of the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and the late Nobel Laureate Oliver Smithies of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Funding sources for the research included National Eye Institute grant EY11721, the Barbara and Joseph Cohen Foundation, and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute grant HL49277. Simon John is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and a research assistant professor in the opthalmology department of Tufts University School of Medicine. The Jackson Laboratory is an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institution based in Bar Harbor, Maine, with a National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Center, a facility in Sacramento, Calif., and a genomic medicine institute in Farmington, Conn. It employs 1,800 staff, and its mission is to discover precise genomic solutions for disease and empower the global biomedical community in the shared quest to improve human health. Williams et al.: Vitamin B modulates mitochondrial vulnerability and prevents glaucoma in aged mice. Science, February 16, 2017, doi:10.1126/science.aal0092.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In mice genetically predisposed to glaucoma, vitamin B3 added to drinking water is effective at preventing the disease, a research team led by Jackson Laboratory Professor and Howard Hughes Medical Investigator Simon W.M. John reports in the journal Science. The vitamin administration was surprisingly effective, eliminating the vast majority of age-related molecular changes and providing a remarkably robust protection against glaucoma. It offers promise for developing inexpensive and safe treatments for glaucoma patients. Glaucoma is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, affecting an estimated 80 million people worldwide. In most glaucoma patients, harmfully high pressure inside the eye or intraocular pressure leads to the progressive dysfunction and loss of retinal ganglion cells. Retinal ganglion cells are the neuronal cells that connect the eye to the brain via the optic nerve. Increasing age is a key risk factor for glaucoma, contributing to both harmful elevation of intraocular pressure and increased neuronal vulnerability to pressure-induced damage. "We wanted to identify key age-related susceptibility factors that change with age in the eye," John says, "and that therefore increase vulnerability to disease and in particular neuronal disease." By understanding general age-related mechanism, there is the potential to develop new interventions to generally protect from common age-related disease processes in many people. Conducting a variety of genomic, metabolic, neurobiological and other tests in mice susceptible to inherited glaucoma, compared to control mice, the researchers discovered that NAD, a molecule vital to energy metabolism in neurons and other cells, declines with age. "There's an analogy with an old motorbike," John says. "It runs just fine, but little things get less reliable with age. One day you stress it: you drive it up a steep hill or you go on really long journey and you get in trouble. It's less reliable than a new bike and it's going to fail with a higher frequency than that new bike." The decrease in NAD levels reduces the reliability of neurons' energy metabolism, especially under stress such as increased intraocular pressure. "Like taking that big hill on your old bike, some things are going to fail more often," John says. "The amount of failure will increase over time, resulting in more damage and disease progression." In essence, the treatments of vitamin B3 (nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3, also called niacinamide) boosted the metabolic reliability of aging retinal ganglion cells, keeping them healthier for longer. "Because these cells are still healthy, and still metabolically robust," says JAX Postdoctoral Associate Pete Williams, first author of the study, "even when high intraocular pressure turns on, they better resist damaging processes." The researchers also found that a single gene-therapy application of Nmnat1 (the gene for an enzyme that makes NAD from nicotinamide) prevented glaucoma from developing in this mouse model. "It can be a problem for patients, especially the elderly, to take their drugs every day and in the correct dose," Williams says. "So gene therapy could be a one-shot, protective treatment." He notes that gene therapies, through injections into the eye, have been approved for a handful of very rare, human genetic eye disorders, and their demonstration of an important age-dependent factor may enable gene therapy for more common eye disease. John says that the team is pursuing clinical partnerships to begin the process of testing the effectiveness of vitamin B3 treatment in glaucoma patients. They are also exploring potential applications for the treatment in other diseases involving neurodegeneration. Collaborating with the John lab was Vittorio Porciatti of the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and the late Nobel Laureate Oliver Smithies of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Funding sources for the research included National Eye Institute grant EY11721, the Barbara and Joseph Cohen Foundation, and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute grant HL49277. Simon John is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and a research assistant professor in the opthalmology department of Tufts University School of Medicine. The Jackson Laboratory is an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institution based in Bar Harbor, Maine, with a National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Center, a facility in Sacramento, Calif., and a genomic medicine institute in Farmington, Conn. It employs 1,800 staff, and its mission is to discover precise genomic solutions for disease and empower the global biomedical community in the shared quest to improve human health.


Aziz H.,Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
Ophthalmic surgery, lasers & imaging : the official journal of the International Society for Imaging in the Eye | Year: 2011

The authors report the histopathologic features of a human enucleated eye with an Ex-PRESS shunt (Optonol, Ltd., Neve Ilan, Israel). An 86-year-old man with a blind painful eye underwent enucleation. He had a history of glaucoma with an Ex-PRESS shunt implanted. Histopathologic evaluation of the specimen showed a thin layer of fibrotic tissue surrounding the implant. In this case, the Ex-PRESS shunt was relatively well tolerated in the human eye. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.


Suk K.K.,Bascom Palmer Eye Institute
Journal of pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus | Year: 2010

Posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is unusual in its atypical features and its aggressive, rapidly progressive course. It is more difficult to recognize and to treat, with many of these eyes progressing to retinal detachment despite multiple treatments with laser or cryotherapy. The authors present a case of aggressive posterior ROP refractory to multiple laser treatment. This patient was successfully treated with intravitreal bevacizumab, but required repeat treatment 4 months later. The second injection with bevacizumab was followed by progression to retinal detachment requiring surgery. The patient remains stable after surgery. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

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