Miami Shores, FL, United States
Miami Shores, FL, United States

Barry University is a private, Catholic university that was founded in 1940 in Miami Shores, Florida, United States, a suburb north of Downtown Miami. It is one of the largest Catholic universities in the Southeast.Barry offers business, nursing, health science, teacher education, and liberal arts programs. It currently has more than 4,000 students, a campus of 54 buildings, and 40,000 alumni. Student to faculty ratio is 14:1. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Powerful New Book by Karen L. Smith, DPM, Explains How to Stop Heel Pain Permanently, Even if Insurance Doesn’t Cover Care Plantar fasciitis afflicts as many as one in 10 Americans – with summer a high season for worsening symptoms and new cases, says Arizona foot-and-ankle surgeon Karen L. Smith, DPM, whose new book – "Killing Heel Pain: Your Final Freedom from Plantar Fasciitis – reviews strategies for treating the condition. Her book is written especially for sufferers with limited or no healthcare coverage as well as those with great coverage but who have been discouraged by the condition's difficulty to treat. Scottsdale, AZ, May 17, 2017 --( Called "Killing Heel Pain: Your Final Freedom from Plantar Fasciitis," the 128-page, easy reading, vividly illustrated how-to guide hit print April 4 at its regular price of $15.85, but will be offered at no charge in electronic form between now and Thursday, May 17, Smith said. “I feel it’s important to put this book in the hands of as many plantar fasciitis sufferers as possible because it’s such a troublesome foot condition,” she explained. “During their adult life, more than one in 10 Americans will develop plantar fasciitis. More than 2 million cases are treated each year in the U.S. alone.” In "Killing Heel Pain," Smith reviews strategies for treating plantar fasciitis – frequently and incorrectly referred to as heel spurs. “I’ve written the book to help sufferers who have limited or no healthcare coverage as well as those who have great coverage but were disappointed that the condition seemed to defy treatment,” the author said. “For example, custom orthotics – supports worn inside shoes – are very helpful for plantar fasciitis, but often cost more than $400, bad news if you don’t have good coverage. Over-the-counter orthotics cost around $35 and can also be beneficial, but they are a waste of money if the incorrect type. “I guide readers on how to select the right type of orthotic and the right type of shoes based on their individual lifestyle. For sufferers who have failed traditional conservative methods, I review different high-tech treatment options and what to expect when considering surgical treatment.” Summer can be a “blooming season” for plantar fasciitis, often because that is the time of year people become more active, Smith said. “A sedentary winter lifestyle followed by a sudden increase in activity can trigger plantar fasciitis,” she indicated. Most people who have experienced plantar fasciitis learn that their painful heel can seem to partially resolve, only to flare up again later, Smith said. “It’s a notorious loiterer,” she warned. Smith said the declining availability of health insurance and shrinking provider-networks also deserve blame for the problem of heel pain. “Plantar fasciitis too often goes untreated – and the reason for that is many people who could benefit from a podiatrist’s care can’t get insurance to authorize treatment or can’t afford to meet the currently high out-of-pocket deductibles their plan requires,” she explained. “In 'Killing Heel Pain,' I offer tips to help you know when to see a physician and what to expect. I also explain how to get the most benefit from whatever your doctor recommends. “I cover the self-treatment homework that every person with plantar fasciitis should be doing. Tips for immediate pain relief and what steps will start the healing process.” Plantar fasciitis responds best to a comprehensive approach, Smith conveyed. “We treat it from several angles at once,” she said. “Unfortunately, it isn’t possible to explain the ‘why’ behind all of the advice we give patients about plantar fasciitis in a single office visit.” Smith said some patients don’t experience much relief from heel pain because they have a hard time understanding the practicality of the advice their doctor gives. “It’s hard to follow even simple recommendations when it’s not readily apparent how or why those recommendations help relieve pain,” she asserted. “For example, your doctor recommends you stretch your calf muscle every day. Why? The illustrations in my book help you see the reason. The illustrations translate this complex condition into easily understood visual terms.” The best treatment for plantar fasciitis depends on the individual, according to Smith. “Treatment strategies that work for some patients won’t always work for others,” she conceded. “That is the focus of my book, helping sufferers find what works best for them and their lifestyle. “What makes 'Killing Heel Pain' different from other books on this subject is how user-friendly it is. You can quickly find detailed, straightforward answers to your burning questions about heel pain. I want you to achieve total pain relief as well as complete healing – final freedom – from this life-intrusive condition.” About Karen L. Smith, DPM Karen L. Smith is a licensed podiatrist and foot-and-ankle surgeon who trained at the prestigious Highlands Foot and Ankle Institute in Denver, Colorado. She earned a doctor of podiatric medicine degree from Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery in Miami Shores, Florida, where she also obtained a master’s degree in biomedical sciences. For more information, contact Smith at info@blueviperbooks.com Scottsdale, AZ, May 17, 2017 --( PR.com )-- A new book that shows how to beat plantar fasciitis – the most common source of agonizing and debilitating heel pain – is available as a free download at Amazon.com for two days only, starting today, according to author Karen L. Smith, DPM, a foot-and-ankle surgeon from Arizona.Called "Killing Heel Pain: Your Final Freedom from Plantar Fasciitis," the 128-page, easy reading, vividly illustrated how-to guide hit print April 4 at its regular price of $15.85, but will be offered at no charge in electronic form between now and Thursday, May 17, Smith said.“I feel it’s important to put this book in the hands of as many plantar fasciitis sufferers as possible because it’s such a troublesome foot condition,” she explained. “During their adult life, more than one in 10 Americans will develop plantar fasciitis. More than 2 million cases are treated each year in the U.S. alone.”In "Killing Heel Pain," Smith reviews strategies for treating plantar fasciitis – frequently and incorrectly referred to as heel spurs. “I’ve written the book to help sufferers who have limited or no healthcare coverage as well as those who have great coverage but were disappointed that the condition seemed to defy treatment,” the author said.“For example, custom orthotics – supports worn inside shoes – are very helpful for plantar fasciitis, but often cost more than $400, bad news if you don’t have good coverage. Over-the-counter orthotics cost around $35 and can also be beneficial, but they are a waste of money if the incorrect type.“I guide readers on how to select the right type of orthotic and the right type of shoes based on their individual lifestyle. For sufferers who have failed traditional conservative methods, I review different high-tech treatment options and what to expect when considering surgical treatment.”Summer can be a “blooming season” for plantar fasciitis, often because that is the time of year people become more active, Smith said.“A sedentary winter lifestyle followed by a sudden increase in activity can trigger plantar fasciitis,” she indicated.Most people who have experienced plantar fasciitis learn that their painful heel can seem to partially resolve, only to flare up again later, Smith said. “It’s a notorious loiterer,” she warned.Smith said the declining availability of health insurance and shrinking provider-networks also deserve blame for the problem of heel pain.“Plantar fasciitis too often goes untreated – and the reason for that is many people who could benefit from a podiatrist’s care can’t get insurance to authorize treatment or can’t afford to meet the currently high out-of-pocket deductibles their plan requires,” she explained.“In 'Killing Heel Pain,' I offer tips to help you know when to see a physician and what to expect. I also explain how to get the most benefit from whatever your doctor recommends.“I cover the self-treatment homework that every person with plantar fasciitis should be doing. Tips for immediate pain relief and what steps will start the healing process.”Plantar fasciitis responds best to a comprehensive approach, Smith conveyed.“We treat it from several angles at once,” she said. “Unfortunately, it isn’t possible to explain the ‘why’ behind all of the advice we give patients about plantar fasciitis in a single office visit.”Smith said some patients don’t experience much relief from heel pain because they have a hard time understanding the practicality of the advice their doctor gives.“It’s hard to follow even simple recommendations when it’s not readily apparent how or why those recommendations help relieve pain,” she asserted. “For example, your doctor recommends you stretch your calf muscle every day. Why? The illustrations in my book help you see the reason. The illustrations translate this complex condition into easily understood visual terms.”The best treatment for plantar fasciitis depends on the individual, according to Smith.“Treatment strategies that work for some patients won’t always work for others,” she conceded. “That is the focus of my book, helping sufferers find what works best for them and their lifestyle.“What makes 'Killing Heel Pain' different from other books on this subject is how user-friendly it is. You can quickly find detailed, straightforward answers to your burning questions about heel pain. I want you to achieve total pain relief as well as complete healing – final freedom – from this life-intrusive condition.”About Karen L. Smith, DPMKaren L. Smith is a licensed podiatrist and foot-and-ankle surgeon who trained at the prestigious Highlands Foot and Ankle Institute in Denver, Colorado. She earned a doctor of podiatric medicine degree from Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery in Miami Shores, Florida, where she also obtained a master’s degree in biomedical sciences.For more information, contact Smith at info@blueviperbooks.com


Jim Roach never expected to be struggling with student debt in his 50s. When his daughter Lauren got accepted to Northwestern University, the Dallas-based serial entrepreneur and father of six was making too much money to qualify for certain kinds of loans. So he made the seemingly logical decision to take out a loan directly from the university. By the time Lauren graduated in 2006, the principal balance was down to $40,000–steep but manageable. That’s when a series of unfortunate events struck: cancer, an expensive divorce, a new child born with a severe hearing impairment, a business going belly-up. Years of wrangling over payment ensued, with the end result of the school demanding the principal and an additional $27,000 in fees and interest. “They were acting like a loan shark,” Roach tells Fast Company. He was eventually allowed–yes, allowed–to fork over the $40,000 principal, but he had to cut bait and leave his daughter on the hook for the rest. Roach didn’t know it at the time, but he was part of a microeconomic wave, one that could easily turn into a macroeconomic tsunami. The baby boom generation is increasingly being sucked into America’s student debt crisis, and no one seems to know what effect it will have on the economy. Student loans are generally thought to be a concern for young people. And they are: As of the end of 2015, per the latest available data from the New York Fed, Americans aged 18-34 held a massive $601.53 billion tab for higher education. But that same data also indicates that mom and dad (or grandma and grandpa in some cases) are shouldering more and more of these debts. From 2005 to 2015, the amount of student loan debt held by those ages 60-64 has increased eightfold, from $4.85 billion to $38.35 billion. For those aged 55-59, the increase is about fivefold, from $13.9 billion to $65.47 billion. And these older debtors are not exactly paying those loans off: 12.6% of debt held by 60- to 64-year-olds was in default at the end of 2015, a higher default rate than anyone under 40. To make matters worse, the Trump era is not shaping up to be particularly friendly toward people struggling to pay off their educations. His education secretary, Betsy DeVos, has already scrapped an Obama-era plan to streamline the government’s system for servicing student loans. And just this week, a leaked education budget obtained by the Washington Post revealed a proposal to end a student loan-forgiveness program for public servants, creating uncertainty for some 400,000 borrowers. The decisions driving the rising tide of boomer student loans are varied. Sometimes it’s parents like Roach who take out loans to pay for their kids’ tuition. Other times, it’s older workers who want to get a higher degree so they can be more attractive to employers. That was the case with 64-year-old Shelley Placito-Leaser, who had 20 years of counseling experience when she left the Air Force in the mid-’90s, but who wanted to continue her work in the civilian world–and be well compensated for it–something that required a higher degree. She went back to school in her 40s to get her Master of Social Work, starting at Barry University in Miami and finishing it up at Tulane University in New Orleans. That degree ended up costing Placito-Leaser $50,000 on its face, and like many students, she borrowed money to cover the costs. She finally paid off the last of her loans in 2006, more than a decade after graduating–but that was only thanks to a windfall the family received. “The system is not designed to behave kindly toward people who are trying better themselves,” Placito-Leaser says. “If I hadn’t re-married, I would have been a single mother trying to balance school and parenting and work. I can’t imagine having been a single mother and being able to do this.” Research on student debt and its potential effects on the economy abounds, but it tends to focus on millennials. “Students in Distress,” an excellent study on default-related labor market shocks from NYU Stern’s Holger Mueller and Constantine Yanellis, is one recent example. On the flip side, discussions about baby boomers in debt tend to underplay or even ignore the student loan problem, even though student-loan delinquencies are rising for that age group. The New York Fed collects data on student debt levels for different age groups–as do other organizations–but no one’s really crunched the numbers in a way that would predict what the rising tide of student-loan debt among older Americans might mean for the economy at large. One of the more obvious potential effects would involve the real estate market. “We mostly see the impact of situations like that with studies on millennials and homeownership,” says Paul Weinstein, director of the MA in Public Management program at Johns Hopkins and a researcher frequently cited by the Public Policy Institute. It’s long been known that buying a house is increasingly out of reach for younger adults, but millennials aren’t the only ones losing their grip on this core aspect of the American Dream. “About five years ago we started hearing from our members they’re running into buyers with too much debt,” says Jessica Lautz, managing director of survey research and communications for the National Association of Realtors. The observation inspired some hard research revealing that about 70% of homebuyers with student-loan debt aged 52 to 61 said their loans were $10,000 or more, with a median burden of $18,000. That’s only $7,000 less than the median amount owed by those 36 and younger. There’s also the possibility, Weinstein and Lautz agree, that the burden of higher education debt is being masked some by parents taking out second mortgages on their homes to pay for their kids’ college tuition, since such mortgages aren’t counted in the student loan pile. But that possibility is difficult to track using just numbers. “Homeownership is the traditional way middle-income families have built on wealth, and if parents are taking out equity on their home, that’s a wonderful thing to do for their children,” Lautz says. “But the problem is if you’re taking on that debt later in life, that will hit you. It could hit retirement savings.” Researchers are understandably reluctant to hypothesize on broader macroeconomic effects, given the dearth of research around this specific question. “Truthfully there is no good research out there,” Lautz says. “We know it’s the second largest sector of debt after mortgages. But many researchers tend to focus on crises that have already happened, and it is hard to get the data. If you’re looking at whether people are putting off retirement, the only way to do that is to actually ask them.” One approximation comes from NAR, which did a survey of homeowners currently repaying student loans. The group found that 60% of boomers in that position expect to delay buying a new home by three to five years. Those who do buy homes tend to be buying for multigenerational living, which typically means they’re taking care of older parents in addition to possibly playing host to grown children. Placito-Leaser got free of her debt after making payments of $500 to $700 a month for nearly a decade. “Certainly it made a difference with what we could do with our lives,” she says. “There were vacations we didn’t take, that sort of thing.” Though she’s now retired, it was a tough row to hoe. The same goes for Roach, who started another business a couple years ago but was left with no savings–not exactly a position a 59-year-old wants to find himself in. The AARP has studied its members’ attitudes toward debt, using data from the Employee Benefits Research Institute, but not with a specific focus on student loans. Its analysis of a 2016 survey of Americans 50 and older paints a picture of workers and retirees worried about debt in general: Half of the workers reported having a problem with debt, while a third of the retirees reported the same. One in nine said debt was a “major problem.” And the problem is only going to get worse, with older members of Generation X now footing the bill for their children’s increasingly expensive educations, which are widely viewed as requisites for employment. Roach offers a hint at what we might be seeing more of in the coming years. “I work with guys in their 70s and they’re out there swinging,” Roach says. “College is the reason a lot of people are still out there–we’ve got educations to pay for.”


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Orlando, FL, April 15, 2017 --( Prior to joining Kelley Kronenberg, Mr. Brown was an Associate Attorney at a full-service law firm. His background encompasses a wide range of legal experience including family law, estate planning, criminal defense, foreclosure litigation, business law and general civil litigation. He also operated his own law firm where he handled family law, wills and general civil cases. Additionally, he has acted as a Guardian Ad Litem, advocating for the best interests of alleged child abuse victims. Among his industry involvement, Mr. Brown is a member of the Seminole County Bar Association. Active in the community, he has volunteered his time to several organizations including Habitat for Humanity International, Greyhound Pets of America of Greater Orlando, and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Florida. Mr. Brown earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Central Florida and his Juris Doctor degree from Barry University School of Law. He is admitted to practice law in Florida and the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida. About Kelley Kronenberg Kelley Kronenberg is a diverse, full-service business law firm that provides litigation and other legal services to established corporations, insurance companies, entrepreneurs and individuals in Florida and other regions of the U.S. More than 115 attorneys strong, the firm offers 25 distinct practice areas throughout its network of ten offices in Florida and Illinois. Founded in 1980, Kelley Kronenberg was built on relationships and continues to grow and excel because of its strength, offering sound legal counsel and exceptional client service. Kelley Kronenberg is ranked in the Top 25 Largest Law Firms in South Florida by the South Florida Business Journal, and has been recognized as a Top Law Firm in Florida by the South Florida Legal Guide and LexisNexis ® Martindale-Hubbell®. More information on practice areas and office locations is available at www.kelleykronenberg.com. Orlando, FL, April 15, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Kelley Kronenberg, a diverse, full-service business law firm, announced that Christopher E. Brown has joined the firm’s Orlando office as an Attorney. Mr. Brown focuses his practice on the defense of Property and Casualty claims, including Personal Injury, Premises Liability, Construction Litigation, Products Liability, and complex General Liability matters involving wrongful death and catastrophic injuries.Prior to joining Kelley Kronenberg, Mr. Brown was an Associate Attorney at a full-service law firm. His background encompasses a wide range of legal experience including family law, estate planning, criminal defense, foreclosure litigation, business law and general civil litigation. He also operated his own law firm where he handled family law, wills and general civil cases. Additionally, he has acted as a Guardian Ad Litem, advocating for the best interests of alleged child abuse victims.Among his industry involvement, Mr. Brown is a member of the Seminole County Bar Association. Active in the community, he has volunteered his time to several organizations including Habitat for Humanity International, Greyhound Pets of America of Greater Orlando, and the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Florida.Mr. Brown earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Central Florida and his Juris Doctor degree from Barry University School of Law. He is admitted to practice law in Florida and the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida.About Kelley KronenbergKelley Kronenberg is a diverse, full-service business law firm that provides litigation and other legal services to established corporations, insurance companies, entrepreneurs and individuals in Florida and other regions of the U.S. More than 115 attorneys strong, the firm offers 25 distinct practice areas throughout its network of ten offices in Florida and Illinois. Founded in 1980, Kelley Kronenberg was built on relationships and continues to grow and excel because of its strength, offering sound legal counsel and exceptional client service. Kelley Kronenberg is ranked in the Top 25 Largest Law Firms in South Florida by the South Florida Business Journal, and has been recognized as a Top Law Firm in Florida by the South Florida Legal Guide and LexisNexis ® Martindale-Hubbell®. More information on practice areas and office locations is available at www.kelleykronenberg.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Kelley Kronenberg


Patent
Barry University | Date: 2015-10-15

Embodiments of the present disclosure include materials and methods relating to sterilization devices. In certain embodiments, materials and methods disclosed herein relate to pre-surgical sterilization of an appendage of a subject using a device that reduces surgical preparation time and microbial growth. Certain embodiments of the present disclosure disclose materials and methods to ameliorate high costs associated with medical care, especially the utilization of costly elective hospital services, by for example reducing operating room costs and increasing efficiency without compromising patient health.


Compositions for treating a condition associated with activity of a muscarinic receptor (e.g., one or more of M_(1), M_(2), M_(3), M_(4), M_(5)) and for anesthetizing a subject include a bitopic muscarinic antagonist or agonist. A bitopic muscarinic antagonist named JB-D4 was discovered. This bitopic ligand and its structural analogs, as well as bitopic muscarinic agonists, may be used as neuromuscular blocking agents (e.g., for use in compositions for anesthetizing a subject) and for the treatment of central nervous system disorders (e.g., Parkinsons disease, Schizophrenia, etc.), Overactive Bladder Syndrome, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, asthma, and many other diseases associated with the activation or inhibition of M_(1)-M_(5 )acetylcholine receptors.


Compositions for treating a condition associated with activity of a muscarinic receptor (e.g., one or more of M_(1), M_(2), M_(3), M_(4), M_(5)) and for anesthetizing a subject include a bitopic muscarinic antagonist or agonist. A bitopic muscarinic antagonist named JB-D4 was discovered. This bitopic ligand and its structural analogs, as well as bitopic muscarinic agonists, may be used as neuromuscular blocking agents (e.g., for use in compositions for anesthetizing a subject) and for the treatment of central nervous system disorders (e.g., Parkinsons disease, Schizophrenia, etc.), Overactive Bladder Syndrome, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, asthma, and many other diseases associated with the activation or inhibition of M_(1)-M_(5 )acetylcholine receptors.


Compositions for treating a condition associated with activity of a muscarinic receptor (e.g., one or more of M_(1), M_(2), M_(3), M_(4), M_(5)) and for anesthetizing a subject include a bitopic muscarinic antagonist or agonist. A bitopic muscarinic antagonist named JB-D4 was discovered. Additional bitopic muscarinic antagonists discovered and described herein include BK-23, HD-42, HD153, HD-185, KH-5, JM-31 and JM-32. These bitopic ligands and their structural analogs, as well as bitopic muscarinic agonists, may be used as neuromuscular blocking agents (e.g., for use in compositions for anesthetizing a subject) and for the treatment of central nervous system disorders (e.g., Parkinsons disease, Schizophrenia, etc.), Overactive Bladder Syndrome, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, asthma, and many other diseases associated with the activation or inhibition of M_(1)-M_(5 )acetylcholine receptors.


The present invention provides methods of treatment by delivering nitric oxide at a pressure greater than 1 atmosphere (atm) to a subject in need thereof. Thus, the present invention provides an improved method of treating the skin surface of a subject, and below the skin surface of a subject.


Patent
Barry University | Date: 2015-11-12

Embodiments of the present disclosure provide systems and devices for delivering gaseous Nitrous Oxide (gNO) under therapeutic parameters to reduce infection in a subject. Certain embodiments include devices and systems for delivering pressurized gNO to reduce bioburden and promote healing in the wounds of subjects having various disease conditions, including skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and osteomyelitis. In some embodiments, the present disclosure provides portable wound healing devices for delivering pressurized gNO to the site of a wound to treat various disease conditions in a subject.


Patent
Barry University | Date: 2015-11-12

Embodiments of the present disclosure provide materials and methods relating to cell and tissue culture testing systems. Certain embodiments of the present disclosure relate to in vitro testing systems that are useful for performing experiments to investigate the potential for various factors to reduce bioburden, reduce the manifestations of infection, and to promote wound healing in cultured cells and tissues. In some embodiments, the present disclosure provides means for investigating biological mechanisms underlying wound healing, including the ability of pressurized gas to reduce the manifestations of infection by reducing bioburden.

Loading Barry University collaborators
Loading Barry University collaborators