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Fallon M.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Porwal A.,Curtin University Australia | Guj P.,Curtin University Australia
Ore Geology Reviews | Year: 2010

The Plutonic Marymia Greenstone Belt is the sixth largest gold camp in Western Australia. Quantitative estimates of the residual endowment of this greenstone belt based on Zipf's Law indicate that the belt contains between 5.5 and 5.9. Moz of gold in undiscovered deposits larger than 0.1. Moz, including six undiscovered deposits ranging in size between 0.7. Moz and 0.4. Moz and another six undiscovered deposits ranging between 0.3. Moz and 0.2. Moz, in addition to several smaller deposits. GIS-based prospectivity analyses using weights-of-evidence and logistic regression models were undertaken to delineate prospective areas where these yet-to-be-discovered deposits could be spatially located. This knowledge will be critical in guiding future exploration programs in the Plutonic Marymia Greenstone Belt. © 2010. Source


Gazley M.F.,Victoria University of Wellington | Gazley M.F.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Vry J.K.,Victoria University of Wellington | Boorman J.C.,Victoria University of Wellington
Journal of Metamorphic Geology | Year: 2011

The metamorphosed mafic rocks of Archean greenstone belts host major orogenic gold deposits, and may record information about changing pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions that could contribute to understanding of Archean geodynamic processes. Until recently, it was difficult to obtain good constraints on pressure and temperature from these rocks. Here we present results of P-T pseudosection calculations in the NCFMASHTOS (Na2O-CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-TiO2-O-SO2) system, using as an example typical amphibolite facies metabasaltic rocks from the Plutonic Gold Mine in the Neoarchean Plutonic Well Greenstone Belt (PWGB), Marymia Inlier, Western Australia. The pseudosections together with observed mineral compositions and mineral assemblages in the rocks are used to argue that a previously unrecognized steep pressure increase (from ∼3-4kbar at ∼500°C to ≥8kbar at ∼600°C) accompanied metamorphism to peak temperatures. The P-T data presented here could be the result of either horizontal or vertical tectonics. Existing models for the early evolution of the PWGB involve nappe stacking supported by relatively cold strong crust, with little overall change in thickness. While the available evidence from the study area and the wider region is not yet sufficient to confirm whether the peak metamorphic conditions were attained by horizontal or vertical tectonic means, the P-T data presented here can provide region-specific constraints for computer modelling that may provide a more definite answer in the future. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Source


Smith G.B.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Butcher R.J.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Uzbekova A.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Mort E.,Caterpillar Inc. | Clement A.,WesTrac Pty Ltd
11th AusIMM Underground Operators' Conference 2011, Proceedings | Year: 2011

Barrick (Australia Pacific) Limited initiated a trial of Caterpillar's Minegem autonomous loader technology in 2009 at the Kanowna Belle mine in Kalgoorlie. Autonomous loader technology offers the potential to improve loader productivity, reduce operating costs and improve safety through removing personnel from the mine operating environment. This paper discusses the implementation of the technology at the mine site, the data collected during the trial and quantifies the benefits of using automated loader technology in comparison with teleremote loader operation. The lessons learned from the trial and work planned for the future in respect of this technology is also discussed. Source


Gazley M.F.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Gazley M.F.,Victoria University of Wellington | Duclaux G.,CSIRO | Fisher L.A.,CSIRO | And 6 more authors.
Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy, Section B: Applied Earth Science | Year: 2012

The amphibolite-facies metabasaltic rocks of the Mine Mafic Package at Plutonic Gold Mine, Western Australia, contain an estimated endowment of 10·5 Moz of Au. A preliminary study based on portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) analyses identified a geochemical stratigraphy which strongly controlled the location of Au mineralisation. The present study incorporates a significantly larger pXRF dataset and presents the data in a three-dimensional framework. This dataset allows an investigation of the mineralogy of Au mineralisation with varying geochemical associations across the deposit. Historically, high As content in the mill feed resulted in poor metallurgical performance. Seamless data integration of the pXRF dataset allows for recognition of the different styles of Au mineralisation based on Au/As ratios, and visualisation of the distribution of these different mineralogical associations in three dimensions. This work enables us to better predict the As concentration of underground ore blocks, and to be proactive in optimising the mill configuration to improve metallurgical performance. © 2012 The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Published by Maney on behalf of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining and The AusIMM. Source


Gazley M.F.,Barrick Australia Pacific Ltd | Gazley M.F.,Victoria University of Wellington | Duclaux G.,CSIRO | Fisher L.A.,CSIRO | And 6 more authors.
8th International Mining Geology Conference 2011, Proceedings | Year: 2011

The amphibolite-facies metabasaltic rocks of the Mine Mafic Package at Plutonic Gold Mine, Marymia Inlier, Western Australia, contain an estimated total endowment of 12.2 Moz of Au, which includes 4.71 Moz of past production and 2.77 Moz of reserves and resources; the remainder comprises lower-grade inventory. Over 65 000 multi-element analyses of whole-rock core and face channel samples from the underground workings of the deposit have been collected by portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) using a handheld Innov-X Omega pXRF unit. The analyses were performed on pulverised samples through paper bags, and were corrected using a pulverised, matrix-matched, reference standard. This method of data correction compares favourably with conventional XRF analyses performed on the same samples. A preliminary study based on pXRF analyses from a small number of drill holes found that a geochemical stratigraphy was evident in the pXRF data, and that this stratigraphy strongly controlled the location of Au mineralisation. The present study incorporates a much larger pXRF data set that samples a greater volume of diamond drill core and face channel samples and presents the data in a three-dimensional (3D) framework. This data set allows an investigation of the mineralogy of Au mineralisation with varying geochemical associations across the deposit. Historically, there has been a strong relationship identified between As and Au, which has caused issues with metallurgical performance, rendering some areas of the deposit only marginally economic. Utilising seamless data integration of the pXRF data set allows for recognition of the different styles of Au mineralisation using elemental concentrations and ratios from the multi-element analyses (Au:As, Au:As:Cu, As:Cu vs. K:V), and to visualise the distribution of these different mineralogical associations in 3D. The results of the 3D modelling and geochemical characterisation of the different styles of Au mineralisation are currently the focus of an extensive metallurgical testing program, the preliminary results of which are presented here. Source

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