Barnsley, United Kingdom
Barnsley, United Kingdom

Time filter

Source Type

Zhang X.,University of Sheffield | Chen Q.,University of Sheffield | Bradford R.,Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council | Sharifi V.,University of Sheffield | Swithenbank J.,University of Sheffield
Fuel Processing Technology | Year: 2010

The use of biomass to generate energy offers significant environmental advantages for the reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases. The main objective of this study was to investigate the performance of a small scale biomass heating plant: i.e. combustion characteristics and emissions. An extensive series of experimental tests was carried out at a small scale residential biomass heating plant i.e. wood chip fired boiler. The concentrations of CO, NOx, particulate matter in the flue gas were measured. In addition, mathematical modelling work using FLIC and FLUENT codes was carried out in order to simulate the overall performance of the wood fired heating system. Results showed that pollutant emissions from the boiler were within the relative emission limits. Mass concentration of CO emission was 550-1600 mg/m3 (10% O2). NOx concentration in the flue gas from the wood chips combustion varied slightly between 28 and 60 ppmv. Mass concentration of PM10 in the flue gas was 205 mg/m 3 (10% O2) The modelling results showed that most of the fuel was burnt inside the furnace and little CO was released from the system due to the high flue gas temperature in the furnace. The injection of the secondary air provided adequate mixing and favourable combustion conditions in the over-bed chamber in the wood chips fired boiler. This study has shown that the use of wood heating system result in much lower CO2 emissions than from a fossil fuel e.g. coal fired heating system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Finney K.N.,University of Sheffield | Zhou J.,University of Sheffield | Chen Q.,University of Sheffield | Zhang X.,University of Sheffield | And 7 more authors.
Applied Thermal Engineering | Year: 2012

Decentralised energy in the UK is rare. Cities in the north of England however lead the UK in terms of sustainable, low-carbon, local/district heating, through the implementation of combined-heat-and-power (CHP) facilities; substantial schemes are installed in several cities, including Barnsley and Sheffield. This paper presents the results from extensive experimental and theoretical feasibility studies, in which the merits of these were explored. Barnsley has a number of biomass-fuelled community energy generators, where pollutant monitoring and mathematical modelling were conducted to assess combustion characteristics and overall system performance. Measured pollutant levels were within the relative emission limits, though emission concentrations (CO, CO 2, NO and particles) in the flue gas from the coal boiler were higher than the wood pellet boiler. Sheffield already has a citywide district energy network, centred around a sustainably-sourced waste-to-energy facility; an expansion of this scheme was investigated here. This focuses mainly on the link to a 30 MW wood-fired CHP plant, which could be a significant provider of additional thermal capacity (low-grade heat) to an expanded network. Through identifying heat sources and sinks - potential suppliers and end-users - key areas were identified where a connection to the heat network would be feasible. © 2012.


Chen Q.,University of Sheffield | Zhang X.,University of Sheffield | Bradford D.,Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council | Sharifi V.,University of Sheffield | Swithenbank J.,University of Sheffield
Energy and Fuels | Year: 2010

Biomass combustion is mainly used for heat production in a wide range of units. Few research studies have been carried out to investigate the overall performance of small-scale residential heating systems when replacing coal with biomass in these units. Sheffield University (SUWIC) has carried out an extensive series of experimental tests at a small-scale residential heating plant. Various tests were conducted on two units: a wood pellet fired boiler and a coal fired boiler. In addition, mathematical modeling work using FLIC and FLUENT codes was carried out in order to simulate the overall performance of the small-scale biomass and coal-fired heating systems. The main objective of this study was to investigate the changes to the overall performance of the plant (e.g., combustion characteristics and emissions) when replacing coal with wood pellets. The concentrations of CO, NOx, particulate matter, and SO2 in the flue gases were measured. Emission factors for both boilers were also compared. FLIC code integrated with FLUENT was employed to model the combustion process of wood pellets and coal in both boilers. The measured emission data were used in the development and validation of the modeling work. The modeling work helped to demonstrate the relationship between the fuel combustion behavior and pollutants formation in the residential boilers. Results showed that pollutant emissions from both boilers were within relative emission limits whereas pollutant emission factors for the wood pellet-fired boilers were lower than for the coal-fired boiler. The modeling analysis showed that the high CO emissions from the coal-fired boiler were attributed to the less mixing intensity and low residential time of flue gas in the furnace. For small-scale residential boilers, biomass with a high volatile fraction could be an ideal solid fuel to get higher combustion efficiency and low pollutant emissions. This study has provided valuable information that can be used to help improve future furnace design and retrofit existing small-scale heating systems to reduce overall emissions. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

Loading Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council collaborators
Loading Barnsley Metropolitan Borough Council collaborators