Box Elder, NY, United States
Box Elder, NY, United States

Bard College, founded in 1860 as St. Stephen's College, is a private liberal arts college in Annandale-on-Hudson, a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, United States, in the town of Red Hook. The campus overlooks the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains, and is within the Hudson River Historic District, a National Historic Landmark.The institution consists of a liberal arts college, a conservatory, as well as eight graduate programs offering over 20 graduate degrees in the arts and science. The undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 10:1. The college has a network of over thirty-five affiliated programs, institutes, and centers, spanning twelve cities, five states, seven countries, and four continents.Bard's Annandale campus serves as an important regional cultural institution. Both the CCS Hessel Museum of Contemporary Art and the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts are located on campus. The college also hosts two acclaimed annual arts festivals, Bard SummerScape, and the Bard Music Festival. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On April 18 and 19, the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College will gather top policymakers, economists, and analysts at the 26th Annual Hyman P. Minsky Conference on the State of the U.S. and World Economies to discuss, among many issues, the implications of the new administration’s “America First” policies, focusing on the outlook for trade, taxation, fiscal, and financial regulation measures to generate domestic investments capable of moving the growth rate beyond the “new normal” established in the aftermath of the Great Recession, without jeopardizing financial stability. The conference, “‘America First’ and Financial Stability,” is being organized by the Levy Institute and will take place Tuesday and Wednesday, April 18–19, at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Participants include Esther L. George, president and chief executive officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City; Eric S. Rosengren, president and chief executive officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston; Thomas M. Hoenig, vice chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Peter Praet, chief economist and executive board member, European Central Bank; Michael E. Feroli, chief U.S. economist, JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Arturo O’Connell, formerly, member of the board of governors, Central Bank of Argentina; Lakshman Achuthan, cofounder and chief operations officer, Economic Cycle Research Institute; Rana Foroohar, global business columnist, Financial Times, and global economic analyst, CNN; Michael S. Derby, special writer, The Wall Street Journal; Christian Plumb, Latin America business editor, Reuters; and Yalman Onaran, senior writer, Bloomberg News. The 2017 Minsky Conference will assess, among other issues, the impact of different financing schemes on both infrastructure investment and the return of central bank monetary policies to more neutral interest rates. Since these new policy proposals will have a global impact, the conference will focus on their implication for the performance of European and Latin American economies. The conference will include presentations by Jan Kregel, director of research, Levy Institute; Robert J. Barbera, codirector, Center for Financial Economics, The Johns Hopkins University; Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho, senior scholar, Levy Institute, and emeritus professor of economics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro; Scott Fullwiler, professor of economics, University of Missouri–Kansas City; Arturo Huerta González, professor of economics, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México; Stephanie A. Kelton, research associate, Levy Institute, and professor of economics, University of Missouri–Kansas City; Paolo Savona, formerly, Italian minister of industry and president, Banco di Roma and the Fondo Interbancario di Tutela dei Depositi; Edwin M. Truman, nonresident senior fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics; Michalis Nikiforos, research scholar, Levy Institute; and L. Randall Wray, senior scholar, Levy Institute, and professor of economics, Bard College. The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, founded in 1986 through the generous support of the late Bard College trustee Leon Levy, is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, public policy research organization. The Institute is independent of any political or other affiliation, and encourages diversity of opinion in the examination of economic policy issues while striving to transform ideological arguments into informed debate. Press registrations should be made by calling Mark Primoff at 845-758-7412 or by sending an e-mail to primoff(at)bard.edu.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Nationally, nearly half of all inmates released from prison return there after committing another crime. But the recidivism rate among those who’ve earned college degrees through the Bard Prison Initiative , an adjunct program operated by liberal arts school Bard College inside six medium and maximum security prisons in New York, is far lower: Since the program began in 2001, more than 400 convicts have graduated and eventually been released. Just 2% end up back behind bars. Most also have no trouble finding work. “It’s not that they just don’t return to prison,” says BPI founder and executive director Max Kenner. “It’s that they become independent middle-class taxpaying citizens, neighbors, and pals. They’re engaged in their communities and all kinds civic and positive and educational ways.” The program is structured to resemble a classic college curriculum for associate and bachelor level degrees. BPI has roughly 60 classes overall, which span the liberal arts spectrum from advanced calculus to genetics, and Mandarin Chinese. Students are encouraged to take a full load—about four to five classes per semester—to complete their degrees within the same timeframe as those might outside the walls. Common majors include mathematics, humanities, and social studies, which include a senior thesis that must be defended in front of an academic committee. It’s not a zero-sum commitment: Other inmates can join basic courses in public health, computer science, and food systems, which could help them get hired after their release. Overall, Bard has 90 teachers spread between their six sites. Many are from Bard, but also Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and Columbia, the latter of which for example, has renowned faculty at the Mailman School of Public Health, who help anchor similar studies. Access to quality higher education can make a serious difference someone’s future potential, particularly those in need of second chances. (BPI students would happily argue this fact; their debate team made headlines in 2015 for beating Harvard.) From a fiscal standpoint, though, the reason that the program works is because BPI is frugal. It can’t charge prisoners tuition, but uses their building and supplies as a remote campus. As Kenner puts it, “another institution is picking up the overhead.” Such thinking has led other universities and colleges in at least 15 states try similar programs. To that end, Bard has developed the Consortium for Liberal Arts in Prison, which allows places like University of Notre Dame, University of Vermont, and Wesleyan to share what they’re learning create a strategic planning blueprint that others can follow in hopes of keeping their programs effective and sustainable. But a couple years ago, Kenner realized there was no need to keep the model prison specific. To counter the “crises of cost and access in American education” Bard could expand their model to places like social services centers or even libraries, which could do the same thing on a community level.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs announces its upcoming current affairs programs, which are open to the public. Events take place at: Carnegie Council 170 East 64 Street, New York, NY 10065. To attend in person, please RSVP by going to https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/calendar/upcoming. Or watch them as live webcasts here: http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/live. #Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media May 04 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM ET Cass R. Sunstein, Harvard Law School As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot even understand each other. Does online fragmentation endanger the shared conversations, experiences, and understandings that are the lifeblood of democracy? Terror in France: The Rise of Jihad in the West May 09, 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM ET Gilles Kepel, Sciences Po, Paris In November 2015, ISIS terrorists massacred scores of people in Paris with coordinated attacks on the Bataclan concert hall, cafés and restaurants, and the national sports stadium. On Bastille Day in 2016, an ISIS sympathizer drove a truck into crowds of vacationers at the beaches of Nice. What caused the radicalization of young French Muslims to occur? Why did the governments in France and across Europe fail to address it? Crisis of the Liberal Order May 11, 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Leon Botstein and Walter Russell Mead, Bard College Leon Botstein and Walter Russell Mead will discuss trends in politics across the globe. What explains the resurgence of populism and the rise of political actors on the right? What are the effects on longstanding alliances, international institutions, and accepted norms? Why are democratic systems creating non-democratic outcomes? ABOUT CARNEGIE COUNCIL Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1914, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world. Go to http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.


Dimitrij – An opera, that takes place in 17th century Russia, will have a set designed by David Zinn, a Tony award winner for The Humans and a respected set and costume designer. This will open in July at The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. Little Foxes – A revival of the Lillian Hellman play at the Manhattan Theatre Club, New York City, just opened April 13th.  The forced perspective set was designed by Scott Pask, a Tony Award and Drama Desk Award winner.  The play stars Laura Linney, Cynthia Nixon and Richard Thomas.  www.broadwayworld.com/article/Photo-Flash-First-Look-at-Laura-Linney-and-Cynthia-Nixon-Swapping-Roles-in-THE-LITTLE-FOXES-on-Broadway-20170414 The Price – The set for this revival of the Arthur Miller play was designed by Derek McLane and includes a 10,000 pound ceiling which appears, to the audience, to have no support.  Running through May 14th, at the American Airlines Theatre, New York City, the play stars Mark Ruffalo, Danny DeVito, Jessica Hecht and Tony Shalhoub. McLane is winner of 1997, 2004 OBIE Awards, 2004, 2005, 2007 Lortel Awards, 2009 Tony Award, 2011 Drama Desk Award, 2015, 2016 Art Directors Guild Award, and  2014 Emmy Award. He also designed the Oscar Awards stage for the past five consecutive years. www.globalscenicservices.com Whipped Cream - A ballet with sets designed by the pop surrealist painter Mark Ryden will open May 22nd at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York City. Based on a Richard Strauss libretto, Schlogobers, this is the story of a young boy's over indulgence of candy and his sugar induced hallucinations in which the colorful confections come alive. Global Scenic Services, Inc. (GSSI) is a leading provider of scenery design, automation, fabrication, and lighting and sound services for theatrical productions, fashion shows, and special events around the world.  The GSSI portfolio includes top-tier Broadway productions How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and Hand to God, fashion events including Victoria's Secret Fashion Show and television shows including The Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and NBC's Peter Pan Live. The company is located at 46 Brookfield Avenue, Bridgeport, Connecticut.  globalscenicservices.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-scenic-services-partners-with-award-winning-designers-for-opera-ballet-and-broadway-productions-300443840.html


Ostfeld R.S.,Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Keesing F.,Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Keesing F.,Bard College
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics | Year: 2012

The dynamics of Infectious diseases can be affected by genetic diversity within host populations, species diversity within host communities, and diversity among communities. In principle, diversity can either increase or decrease pathogen transmission and disease risk. Theoretical models and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a dilution effect (decreased disease risk with increasing diversity) can occur under a wide range of conditions. Field studies of plants, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, birds, and mammals demonstrate that the phenomenon indeed does occur in many natural systems. A dilution effect is expected when (a) hosts differ in quality for pathogens or vectors; (b) higher quality hosts tend to occur in species-poor communities, whereas lower quality hosts tend to occur in more diverse communities; and (c) lower quality hosts regulate abundance of high-quality hosts or of vectors, or reduce encounter rates between these hosts and pathogens or vectors. Although these conditions characterize many disease systems, our ability to predict when and where the dilution effect occurs remains poor. The life-history traits that cause some hosts to be widespread and resilient might be correlated with those that promote Infection and transmission by some pathogens, supporting the notion that the dilution effect might be widespread among disease systems. Criticisms of the dilution effect have focused on whether species richness or species composition (both being metrics of biodiversity) drives disease risk. It is well established, however, that changes in species composition correlate with changes in species richness, and this correlation could explain why the dilution effect appears to be a general phenomenon. © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: GEOPHYSICS | Award Amount: 138.55K | Year: 2016

Earths inner core is elastically anisotropic, with seismic waves propagating parallel to the rotation axis about 3% faster than those parallel to the equatorial plane. The inner core also exhibits an attenuation anisotropy, with the faster waves having smaller amplitudes. There is now evidence that the pattern of both anisotropies is more complex, exhibiting depth dependence, hemispherical variations, and smaller scale regional variations. The isotropic seismic velocity may also exhibit regional variations. These puzzling seismic inferences are clues as to the structure and evolution of the solid iron alloy inner core. This grant will allow the PI to investigate the causes of inner core attenuation and its anisotropy, and thus help to better understand the most remote part of our planet. In particular, in laboratory studies the PI will use ultrasonic waves to probe metallic alloys with a variety of microstructures that have been suggested for the inner core, employing ratios of wavelengths to grain and sub-grain lengthscales that are relevant to the inner core. By comparison with seismic data, this will allow the PI to quantify the relative importance of scattering attenuation versus intrinsic attenuation (viscoelasticity). As an RUI grant, the project will involve diverse undergraduates in all aspects of the research, providing them with training and experience in doing science.

Most explanations for the elastic anisotropy rely on a lattice preferred orientation (texturing) of hexagonal close-packed iron crystals, the most likely stable phase of iron under inner core conditions. Explanations for the texturing fall broadly into two classes, that due to solidification and that due to deformation. Directional solidification of metallic alloys typically results in columnar grains formed by primary and secondary dendrites of the primary compositional phase, with the secondary phase along grain boundaries and between dendrites, i.e., intragranular. Such microstructure has been proposed for the inner core, and scattering off grain boundaries of elongated crystals has been suggested as a cause for the attenuation anisotropy. Solidification microstructure is not thermodynamically stable, however, and annealing can result in coarsening of secondary dendrites, while maintaining the primary dendrites and columnar crystals, or possibly, in recrystallization and polygonal grain growth. The latter typically occurs in deformed materials exposed to high temperature. The PI will examine the ultrasonic scattering attenuation of three possible microstructures likely in Earths inner core: directional solidified columnar grains composed of primary and secondary dendrites; directionally solidified and then annealed grains; and polygonal grains that result from recrystallization due to deformation and annealing. He will use Pb-Sn because of its simple eutectic phase diagram, ease of use, and relatively small single crystal elastic anisotropy; and microstructures with relative wavelength/scatterer dimensions thought to be similar to those in the inner core. The PI will use the shape and decay of the ultrasonic coda to determine the quality factor Q, and will compare the ultrasonic waveforms with seismic data to infer regional microstructure in the inner core, which will give insight into the evolution of the inner core.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STUDIES OF THE EARTHS DEEP INT | Award Amount: 7.00K | Year: 2016

This award will partially cover participant costs for the 15th Symposium on Study of Earths Deep Interior (SEDI). The meeting will be held in Nantes, France from July 24-29, 2016. SEDI is an international scientific organization dedicated to the Study of the Earths Deep Interior. The ultimate goal of SEDI is an enhanced understanding of the past evolution and current thermal, chemical and dynamical state of the Earths deep interior and of the effect of that the interior has on structures and processes observed at the surface of the Earth. The deep interior is generally considered to be the core and lower mantle, but interest often extends to the surface, for example, in the study of mantle plumes or dynamics of descending lithospheric slabs. The scientific questions and problems of interest to SEDI include the geomagnetic dynamo and secular variation, paleomagnetism and the evolution of the Earths deep interior, material properties at extreme conditions, structure and dynamics of the core and mantle, core-mantle interactions, and the nature and location of deep geochemical reservoirs.

This workshop will contribute to interdisciplinary education of US graduate students and beginning researchers by fostering dialog with researchers at all levels at a relatively small workshop-style meeting. The international format complements efforts by US national groups such as CIDER and will be useful to those funded under or seeking funding from the NSF CSEDI program. The structure of SEDI is intrinsically interdisciplinary, providing many opportunities for intra- and international collaborations on a broad range of topics that contribute to our understanding of the deep earth and other planetary interiors.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 24.00K | Year: 2014

Funds are provided to partially cover participant costs for beginning scientists at the 14th Symposium on Study of Earths Deep Interior (SEDI). The meeting will be held in Tokyo, Japan from August 4-8, 2014. This proposal will contribute to interdisciplinary education of US graduate students and beginning researchers by fostering dialog with researchers at all levels at a relatively small workshop-style meeting. The international format complements efforts by US national groups such as CIDER and will be useful to those funded under or seeking funding from the NSF CSEDI program. The structure of SEDI is intrinsically interdisciplinary, providing many opportunities for intra- and inter- national collaborations on a broad range of topics that contribute to our understanding of the deep Earth and other planetary interiors.

SEDI is an international scientific organization dedicated to the Study of the Earths Deep Interior. The ultimate goal of SEDI is an enhanced understanding of the past evolution and current thermal, chemical and dynamical state of the Earths deep interior and of the effect the interior has on structures and processes observed at the surface of the Earth. The deep interior is generally considered to be the core and lower mantle, but interest often extends to the surface, for example, in the study of mantle plumes or dynamics of descending lithospheric slabs. The scientific questions and problems of interest to SEDI include the geomagnetic dynamo and secular variation, paleomagnetism and the evolution of the Earths deep interior, material properties at extreme conditions, structure and dynamics of the core and mantle, core-mantle interactions, and the nature and location of deep geochemical reservoirs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 216.00K | Year: 2014

In this project funded by the Chemical Structure, Dynamics and Mechanisms B Program of the Chemistry Division, Professor Craig M. Anderson of the Chemistry Department at Bard College will investigate the synthesis of transition cyclometalated complexes. The study of these complexes may advance the understanding of fundamental catalytic reactions and eventually contribute in areas with energy implications, as cyclometalated complexes are well known in the study of artificial photosynthetic devices. Another very important aspect of this work is that it will involve undergraduates at all levels from first-year to senior students. It will also allow students to gain experience in many diverse skills and techniques such as synthesis, characterization, and analysis of results. The students will become well trained in order to continue further scientific studies, disseminate their work through written publications and oral presentations, and develop new hypotheses for testing.

Cyclometalated transition metal complexes are a very versatile group of compounds whose varied applications include acting as catalysts, sensors, artificial photosynthetic devices, and bio-organometallic agents. The effect that ligand architecture exerts on selectivity and reactivity of cyclometalated complexes is important to understand, as the coordination environment determines both reaction functionality and efficacy. First, the physical and chemical properties of these cyclometalated compounds will be tuned to maximize their benefits, which include catalysis and anti-cancer agents. Second, studying the regiochemistry of C-H and C-X bond activation will be examined in the area of synthetic chemistry. Third, several multi-heteronuclear species will be synthesized and their interaction with biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, and RNA will be examined


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 24.67K | Year: 2015

The purpose of this award is to support participation by students and early career researchers, including members of under-represented groups, in the mathematical and physical sciences at the 14th Experimental Chaos and Complexity Conference (ECC 2016) to be held May 16-19, 2016 in Alberta, Canada. ECC 2016 will bring together an international group of researchers to improve the scientific understanding of complex systems such as the cardiac electrical system, the brain, energy and the power grid, social systems, earthquakes, and climate. The objective of ECC 2016 is to encourage and facilitate the collaboration of experimental and applied research in mathematics, physics, engineering, neuroscience, chemistry, and biology.

ECC 2016 highlights new results in the study of complex systems at a variety of scales. The goal is to bring together experimentalists and applied researchers to study various aspects of of nonlinear dynamics, chaos, and complexity. Examples of applications where this type of collaboration has been successful include the cardiac electrical system, the brain, energy and the power grid, social systems, earthquakes, and climate. These systems can display chaotic dynamics, in that small changes in inputs or features of the system can cause large changes in behavior. The study of complexity and chaos by mathematicians, physicists, engineers, chemists, biologists, and neuroscientists has led to the ability to understand and control chaotic systems in areas ranging from control of cardiac chaos to improved efficiency in combustion systems. The award gives students and early career researchers, including members of under-represented groups, the opportunity to attend and participate in this conference, with the hope that it inspires new research directions and collaborations for this group.

Conference web site: http://wcm.ucalgary.ca/ecc2016/

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