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News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

— According to a recent market report published by Future Market Insights titled, “Barcode Printers Market - Global Industry Analysis & Opportunity Assessment, 2016-2026,” revenue generated from sales of barcode printers globally is estimated to be valued at US$ 2,758.0 Mn and pegged at 3,086.8 ‘000 units by 2016 end. It is expected to increase at a CAGR of 7.4% over the forecast period (2016–2026), to be valued at US$ 5,656.1 Mn by 2026 end. In terms of volume, the global barcode printers market is projected to be pegged at 5,384.3 ‘000 units by 2026 end, expanding at a CAGR of 5.7% over the forecast period. Barcode printer is defined as an electronic device designed specifically for printing of barcodes. The working principle and built of a barcode printer is slightly different from computer printers as it uses ribbons and labels working in tandem to get a barcode printed. Barcode printers usually don’t have programmable logic controllers on their own, but rely on an external computer system. Growth in the manufacturing sector is reviving after the 2008 economic crisis. Automation and streamlining of manufacturing processes are being adopted by a large number of manufacturing companies worldwide to reduce time and material wastage, thereby improving efficiency and output. Barcoding is one such technique that is increasingly being adopted. This process has reduced production time considerably in the manufacturing process, thereby driving demand for barcode printers. Barcodes have become the de facto standard for product information storing and labelling. Retailers worldwide use barcodes for hassle-free recording of supplies and commodities and their sale to customers. Barcodes imprinted on labels are stuck to the products and they record information about the product count, date of manufacture, date supplied to the retailer, selling price, etc. When these products are scanned, the information is retrieved and monitored. This entire process, which is achieved within a matter of seconds, not only increases efficiency but also minimizes errors. This has helped retailers record their products and inventory on shop floors and warehouses. However, threat of RFID tags as substitutes to barcode labels and low compatibility of barcode printers with different operating systems act as restraints in the global barcode printers market. The market is categorically divided into six segments based on printer type, printing technology, consumables, application, distribution channel, and region. The printer type segment of the barcode printers market includes Desktop Barcode Printer, Industrial Barcode Printer, Mobile Barcode Printer and Others. On the basis of printing technology, the market has been divided into Thermal Transfer, Direct Thermal, Dot Matrix, Laser and Ink Jet. On the basis of Distribution Channel, the market is segmented as Direct-to-End User, Direct-to-OEM, Dealer/Distributor and Systems Integrator. On the basis of application, the market has been divided into industrial/manufacturing, transportation/logistics, retail, healthcare, government and commercial services. Preview on Barcode Printers Market By Segmentation By Printer Type - Desktop Barcode Printers, Industrial Barcode Printers and Mobile Barcode Printers, By Printing Technology - Thermal Transfer, Direct Thermal, Dot Matrix and Laser, By Consumables - Ribbons, Wax Ribbons, Wax/Resin Ribbons and Resin Ribbons, By Application - Industrial/Manufacturing, Transportation/Logistics, Retail, Healthcare and Commercial Services, By Distribution Channels - Direct-To-End User, Direct-To-OEM and Others: http://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/barcode-printers-market The Industrial Barcode Printer segment holds the highest market share of 46.1% closely followed by Desktop Barcode Printer in the Barcode Printers Market. The Industrial Barcode Printer segment is also expected to dominate in the forecast period with a CAGR of 8.3% due to a preference of sturdy and rugged barcode printers with higher productivity. Thermal Transfer segment holds the highest market share amongst all with 62.8% and is expected to improve further in the forecast period owing to very less cost involved, while Dot Matrix, Laser and Ink Jet printing technologies are least preferred technologies and are on the verge of being phased out. Dealer/Distributor is the most preferred supply channel and is expected to dominate in the future due to higher distribution efficiency, low supply costs and faster delivery times. North America and Western Europe are the most promising regions for the growth of the market owing to higher preference of barcoding technology in different applications, while the market in the Latin America region is on a slow and stagnant growth due to low adoption of barcoding technology. The growth of the Barcode Printers market in APEJ region may also grow at a slower pace due to saturation and slow down of manufacturing sector in China. Major players identified in the Barcode Printers market are Zebra Technologies Corporation, Avery Dennison Corporation, Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd., Toshiba TEC Corporation, and Honeywell International, Inc. committing a combined market share of over 50%. Other major players are SATO Holdings Corporation, Printronix, Inc. and TSC Auto Id Technology Co., Ltd. supplying to various end use industries and sectors. For more information, please visit http://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/barcode-printers-market


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

According to a recent market report published by Future Market Insights titled, “Barcode Printers Market - Global Industry Analysis & Opportunity Assessment, 2016-2026,” revenue generated from sales of barcode printers globally is estimated to be valued at US$ 2,758.0 Mn and pegged at 3,086.8 ‘000 units by 2016 end. It is expected to increase at a CAGR of 7.4% over the forecast period (2016–2026), to be valued at US$ 5,656.1 Mn by 2026 end. In terms of volume, the global barcode printers market is projected to be pegged at 5,384.3 ‘000 units by 2026 end, expanding at a CAGR of 5.7% over the forecast period. Barcode printer is defined as an electronic device designed specifically for printing of barcodes. The working principle and built of a barcode printer is slightly different from computer printers as it uses ribbons and labels working in tandem to get a barcode printed. Barcode printers usually don’t have programmable logic controllers on their own, but rely on an external computer system. Growth in the manufacturing sector is reviving after the 2008 economic crisis. Automation and streamlining of manufacturing processes are being adopted by a large number of manufacturing companies worldwide to reduce time and material wastage, thereby improving efficiency and output. Barcoding is one such technique that is increasingly being adopted. This process has reduced production time considerably in the manufacturing process, thereby driving demand for barcode printers. Barcodes have become the de facto standard for product information storing and labelling. Retailers worldwide use barcodes for hassle-free recording of supplies and commodities and their sale to customers. Barcodes imprinted on labels are stuck to the products and they record information about the product count, date of manufacture, date supplied to the retailer, selling price, etc. When these products are scanned, the information is retrieved and monitored. This entire process, which is achieved within a matter of seconds, not only increases efficiency but also minimizes errors. This has helped retailers record their products and inventory on shop floors and warehouses. However, threat of RFID tags as substitutes to barcode labels and low compatibility of barcode printers with different operating systems act as restraints in the global barcode printers market. The market is categorically divided into six segments based on printer type, printing technology, consumables, application, distribution channel, and region. The printer type segment of the barcode printers market includes Desktop Barcode Printer, Industrial Barcode Printer, Mobile Barcode Printer and Others. On the basis of printing technology, the market has been divided into Thermal Transfer, Direct Thermal, Dot Matrix, Laser and Ink Jet. On the basis of Distribution Channel, the market is segmented as Direct-to-End User, Direct-to-OEM, Dealer/Distributor and Systems Integrator. On the basis of application, the market has been divided into industrial/manufacturing, transportation/logistics, retail, healthcare, government and commercial services. North America and Western Europe are the most promising regions for the growth of the market owing to higher preference of barcoding technology in different applications, while the market in the Latin America region is on a slow and stagnant growth due to low adoption of barcoding technology. The growth of the Barcode Printers market in APEJ region may also grow at a slower pace due to saturation and slow down of manufacturing sector in China. Major players identified in the Barcode Printers market are Zebra Technologies Corporation, Avery Dennison Corporation, Oki Electric Industry Co., Ltd., Toshiba TEC Corporation, and Honeywell International, Inc. committing a combined market share of over 50%. Other major players are SATO Holdings Corporation, Printronix, Inc. and TSC Auto Id Technology Co., Ltd. supplying to various end use industries and sectors.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The massive decline of over 75% insect biomass reported from Germany between 1989 and 2013 by expert citizen scientists proves the urgent need for new methods and standards for fast and wide-scale biodiversity assessments. If we cannot understand species composition, as well as their diversity patterns and reasons behind them, we will fail not only to predict changes, but also to take timely and adequate measures before species go extinct. An international team of scientists belonging to the largest and connected DNA barcoding initiatives (iBOL, GBOL, BFB), evaluated the use of DNA barcode analysis applied to large samples collected with Malaise traps as a method to rapidly assess the arthropod fauna at two sites in Germany between May and September. One Malaise trap (tent-like structure designed to catch flying insects by attracting them to its walls and then funneling them into a collecting bottle) was set in Germany's largest terrestrial protected natural reserve Nationalpark Bayerischer Wald in Bavaria. Located in southeast Germany, from a habitat perspective, the park is basically a natural forest. The second trap was set up in western Germany adjacent to the Middle River Rhine Valley, located some 485 kilometers away from the first location. Here, the vegetation is eradicated annually due to St. Martin's fires, which occur every November. Their findings are published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. DNA barcoding enables the identification of a collected specimen by comparing its BIN (Barcode Index Number) against the BOLD database. In contrast to evaluation using traditional morphological approaches, this method takes significantly less experience, time and effort, so that science can easily save up on decades of professional work. However, having analyzed DNA barcodes for 37,274 specimens equal to 5,301 different BINs (i.e., species hypotheses), the entomologists managed to assign unambiguous species names to 35% of the BINs, which pointed to the biggest problem with DNA barcoding for large-scale insect inventories today, namely insufficient coverage of DNA barcodes for Diptera (flies and gnats) and Hymenoptera (bees and wasps) and allied groups. As the coverage of the reference database for butterflies and beetles is good, the authors showcase how efficient the workflow for the semi-automated identification of large sample sizes to species and genus level could be. In conclusion, the scientists note that DNA barcoding approaches applied to large-scale samplings collected with Malaise traps could help in providing crucial knowledge of the insect biodiversity and its dynamics. They also invite their fellow entomologists to take part and help filling the gaps in the reference library. The authors also welcome taxonomic experts to make use of the unidentified specimens they collected in the study, but also point out that taxonomic decisions based on BIN membership need to be made within a comparative context, "ideally including morphological data and also additional, independent genetic markers". Otherwise, the grounds for the decision have to be clearly indicated. The study is conducted as part of the collaborative Global Malaise Trap Program (GMTP), which involves more than 30 international partners. The aim is to provide an overview of arthropod diversity by coupling the large-scale deployment of Malaise traps with the use of specimen-based DNA barcoding to assess species diversity. Sequence analyses were partially defrayed by funding from the government of Canada through Genome Canada and the Ontario Genomics Institute in support of the International Barcode of Life project. The German Barcode of Life project (GBOL) is generously supported by a grant from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (FKZ 01LI1101 and 01LI1501) and the Barcoding Fauna Bavarica project (BFB) was supported by a 10-year grant from the Bavarian Ministry of Education, Culture, Research and Art. Geiger M, Moriniere J, Hausmann A, Haszprunar G, Wägele W, Hebert P, Rulik B (2016) Testing the Global Malaise Trap Program - How well does the current barcode reference library identify flying insects in Germany? Biodiversity Data Journal 4: e10671. https:/


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

DENVER, COLORADO--(Marketwired - Feb. 24, 2017) - TrackX Holdings Inc. (TSX VENTURE:TKX) ("TrackX" or the "Company"), announced today its partnership with Barcoding, Inc. ("Barcoding"), the leader in supply chain efficiency, accuracy and connectivity. With thousands of customers and more than 20 years of experience in the delivery of auto-id and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions, Barcoding focuses on the design, deployment and support of fully integrated enterprise asset tracking solutions. The core markets serviced by Barcoding include retail, distribution, manufacturing, healthcare and logistics for an extensive Fortune 500 company customer base. Barcoding is a premier partner with the most prominent providers of unique item level tracking, and offers enterprise mobility and deployment management services to its thousands of customers throughout North America. With customers in the same industries, Barcoding will expedite TrackX implementations to its large customer base while presenting new opportunities beneficial for both companies. Jay Steinmetz, CEO of Barcoding, Inc., said, "The demand for cloud-based, enterprise-scalable asset tracking and inventory management solutions is increasing at a rapid rate. Through our TrackX partnership, Barcoding is able to expand our service offerings with solutions to address this demand and deliver significant value to our customers. TrackX will expand upon its implementation capacity and be in a position to accelerate deployments across a growing number of Fortune 500 customers by tapping into the resources and capability provided by Barcoding." "Barcoding has acute knowledge in the utilization of scanning and IIoT solutions which incorporate auto-id technologies such as RFID, GPS and the emerging world of sensors," said Tim Harvie, president and CEO, TrackX. "As a value-added reseller and systems integrator, Barcoding has the expertise and geographical coverage to support the delivery of TrackX solutions across a growing customer base in the US and Canada. This mutually beneficial partnership provides a strong catalyst for TrackX revenue growth moving forward." Barcoding, Inc. is a systems integrator specializing in the development, deployment, and management of enterprise-wide solutions that drive efficiency, accuracy, and connectivity. With dedicated practices in Supply Chain Architecture and Analytics, Automatic Identification (AIDC), Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), Consumables, Software, and Professionals Services, Barcoding impacts tens of thousands of organizations in a wide range of industries by increasing revenue, reducing operational costs, and improving customer experiences. Founded in 1998, Barcoding is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, with offices across the United States. For more information, visit www.barcoding.com. TrackX also announces that Robb James, former Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, has left the Company. The Company thanks Mr. James for his service and wishes him the best in his future endeavors. TrackX, based in Denver, Colorado, is an enterprise Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) software platform provider leveraging multiple auto-ID technologies for the comprehensive management of physical assets. TrackX's Global Asset Management for the Enterprise (G.A.M.E.) enables the IIoT by providing unique item level tracking, workflow processing, event management, alerts and powerful analytics to deliver solutions across a growing number of industries. This platform creates unprecedented visibility and business intelligence of man-to-machine and machine-to-machine interaction. TrackX delivers significant value to a growing list of Fortune 500 companies and for customers in industries such as transportation, beverage, brewery, healthcare, hi-tech, hospitality, mining, agriculture, horticulture, manufacturing and government. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulations Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION: This news release includes certain "forward-looking statements" under applicable Canadian securities legislation. Forward looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable, are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors which may cause the actual results and future events to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. All statements that address future plans, activities, events or developments that the Company believes, expects or anticipates will or may occur including the Company's anticipated pipeline and value of current and customer deployments and future opportunities are the managements best estimates and cannot be guaranteed or relied upon and is forward-looking information. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements in this news release, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.


An RFID-based data collection, correlation and transmission system and method carried out thereby is provided. The system, which comprises one or more RFID-readers, a radio frequency identification (RFID) recognition and control component. a storage device interface, a portable and/or internal data storage device in communication with the storage device interface, one or more antennas, and a configuration and command component, is operable to collect data of interest from detected RFID tags, and detect and identify system participants and data related thereto. In addition, the system is operable to correlate potential data of interest, such as product advertising information, to the detected system participants, and transmit the data of interest to the system participants via numerous methods of communication. Thus, the system provides a means of highly targeted information distribution, as well as providing user reports valuable in future planning.


Patent
Barcoding | Date: 2015-09-10

Disclosed are devices, systems, apparatus, methods, products, and other implementations, including a method that includes obtaining biometric data of a user, and generating instruction data, presentable on a user interface, based on data relating to one or more activities to be completed by the user and based on the biometric data of the user. In some embodiments, obtaining the biometric data may include measuring one or more of, for example, heart rate, blood pressure, blood oxygen level, temperature, speech-related attributes, breath, and/or eye behavior.


A system for identifying medication in the form of pills, capsules or tablets, and communicating medicine dosage and intake instructions to a user, Utilizing Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) and optical recognition technology. The RFID is performed by labeling a medicine container with a tag containing a unique identifier, associating the unique identifier with an audio file comprising instructions related to medicine usage, and delivering the audio file to an electromagnetic wave-enabled device. A wireless device, such as a mobile telephone or PDA, via a service, plays an audio and/or vibrational file associated with the unique identifier when the RFID tag is read by the device. The mobile device has a camera therein and is operable to capture an image of the pill, capsule or tablet and, via execution of optical recognition software, identify the pill, tablet or capsule, and verify the identity thereof.


News Article | August 9, 2011
Site: techcrunch.com

You’ve heard of the CSI effect, right? It’s this wacky “syndrome” whereby we’ve watched so much CSI Miami and Law and Order that we can’t fully put our weight behind a verdict without some solid DNA evidence. I guess it’s easy to forget that we had an entire legal system sans DNA for quite a while. In any case, we’ve apparently got an itch to be a bunch of white-coated forensic scientists, which is why we’re so lucky that this crazy, and also beautiful, machine exists in the world. It’s called OpenPCR, and it’ll make science-style DIYers drool. PCR stands for polymerase chain reaction, and it’s a crucial tool for just about any type of modern molecular biology. The way it works is by amplifying a specific region of a super teency-weency strain of DNA, and after that I kind of got lost in the biological jargon, but it’s all explained here. With OpenPCR, you can do two different types of tests: DNA Sequencing and DNA Barcoding. Sequencing is where you use the PCR machine to check out some of your own genome, while Barcoding is checking out what kind of species a certain bit of DNA belongs to. If you have yet to be convinced, just check out how these two girls used DNA Barcoding to uncover a New York City scandal (hint: 2 out of 4 Sushi restaurants and 6 out of 10 grocery stores were selling mislabeled fish.) For $599, you’ll get all the parts to the machine, instructions to set it up, and 16 PCR samples — the way by which you target certain regions of the DNA. Features include a heated lid that eliminates condensation, 2-degree per second ramp time (Centigrade), and compatibility with Mac and PC.


News Article | July 10, 2009
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Keeping track of illegally logged trees is a lot easier when you know how many trees there are. At least that's the hope of Helveta, a British company that hammers plastic barcodes into trees. The company, which is tracking a million trees in southeast Asia, Africa, and South America, gives every tree in a plantation above a certain size its own barcode. When a tree is chopped down, workers use a handheld computer to scan processing and export data into Helveta's database. Each felled tree is given a new barcode for export auditing at docks. Think of it as supermarket shopping for trees. So far, Helveta's business is booming. The company just received over $4 million in funding from investors, and its barcoding technology could become even more popular if a global climate deal is passed in December's Copenhagen talks. That's because trees soak up carbon dioxide, effectively making it easier for countries to keep their emissions low. Barcoding technology could also ease the $10 billion annual financial burden on timber-producing countries caused by losses from stolen wood. Indeed, the problem is so widespread that even major companies like IKEA, BMW, and Kraft rely on leather and beef from farms involved in deforestation. Helveta's system can't stop determined criminals from selling illegal timber on the black market, but it does make it more difficult for them to sell or export the wood, as any timber processed without tags is considered illegal. Because in this case, someone does hear when a tree is chopped down in the wilderness.

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