Ramat Gan, Israel
Ramat Gan, Israel

Bar-Ilan University is a public university in Ramat Gan of the Tel Aviv District, Israel.Established in 1955, Bar Ilan is now Israel's second-largest academic institution. It has nearly 26,800 students and 1,350 faculty members. Bar-Ilan University has eight faculties: Exact science, Life science, Social science, Humanities, Jewish Studies, Medicine, Engineering, and Law. There are also interdisciplinary studies.The University aims to forge closer links between Torah and universal studies, "to blend tradition with modern technologies and scholarship, and teach the compelling ethics of Jewish heritage to all... to synthesize the ancient and modern, the sacred and the material, the spiritual and the scientific." Wikipedia.


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Patent
Bar - Ilan University | Date: 2016-08-10

Proteinoid compounds characterized by a molecular weight (Mw) of at least 15,000 Da, processes of preparing such compounds and methods of use thereof, are provided. A method of monitoring the presence and metastases of cancer in a body of an individual is further disclosed.


Patent
Bar - Ilan University | Date: 2016-09-07

The invention relates to inhibitors of a bacterial biofilm formation that target the N loop extension of the periplasmic subunit of a bacterial Phosphate Specific Transfer system (PstS), specifically, of P. aeruginosa. The inhibitors of the invention may be either derived from the N loop extension of PstS or directed against the N loop extension. The invention further provides compositions and methods using said inhibitors in inhibiting biofilm formation and in treating pathologic conditions associated therewith.


Patent
Bar - Ilan University | Date: 2016-10-10

Cyclic D,L--peptides were shown to have an anti-amyloid aggregation effect. The cyclic peptide (designated cyclic peptide-2) having the sequence [1JwHsK], had a drastic effect on amyloid aggregation. However, the linear equivalent of cyclic peptide-2 did not inhibit amyloid formation. Cyclic peptide 2 was also effective in reducing A-induced toxicity in PC12 cells. According to embodiments of the invention, cyclic peptides may comprise between 6 or 8 amino acids. In an embodiment, half of the amino acid residues are in the D-formation, and the other half are in the L-formation. In an embodiment of the invention, the amino acids alternate between the D and L-formations.


Patent
Bar - Ilan University and Ben - Gurion University of the Negev | Date: 2015-04-30

A gain cell includes a write bit line input, a read bit line output, a write trigger input and a read trigger input. The gain cell also includes a write transistor, retention element and read transistor. Each of the transistors includes a respective first diffusion connection, gate connection and second diffusion connection. The write transistor first diffusion connection is connected to the write bit line input and the write transistor gate connection is connected to the write trigger input. The read transistor first diffusion connection being connected to the read bit line output and the second diffusion connection is connected to the read trigger input. The retention element buffers between write transistor and the read transistor during data retention. The retention element also connects or disconnects a write transistor diffusion connection to/from a constant voltage in accordance with a retained data level at the read transistor gate connection.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: PILOTS-02-2016 | Award Amount: 9.44M | Year: 2017

PROTECT aims to introduce to the market One step antimicrobial finish processes for polymeric materials used in i) specialty textiles for public areas and hospitals, ii) water treatment membranes, and iii) implantable medical devices. Compared to main existing manufacturing routes, the proposed one-step coating technologies are simple, fast, and reproducible. For this, PROTECT uses as a starting point four existing pilot lines emanated from high successful FP7 projects SONO, NOVO and BioElectricSurface. PROTECT will upgrade the nanocoating One step process platform comprising: two roll to roll (R2R) pilots (sonochemical and spray coating) for functional textiles production, a R2R thermo-embedding pilot for antibacterial/biofilm preventing water treatment membranes, and a batch sonochemical pilot for antibacterial/antibiofilm/biocompatible medical devices. This platform will cover a wide range of applications due to their specific characteristics by the following objectives: a) Incorporating antibacterial antibiofilm biocompatible novel nanoparticles(NPs) of the following categories: inorganic (CuxZn1-xO ,5 Ga@C-dots, Si/TiO2 composite) polymer (polypyrrole, PPy)) and biologicals (antibacterial enzymes, functionalized lipids (FSLs), hybrid antibacterials) to obtain biocompatible nanostructured surfaces with antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties. b) Implementing real time characterization methods for monitoring at the nanoscale to characterise relevant materials, process properties and product features for real-time nanoscale characterization to ensure reproducibility and quality of the nano-coated products c) Improving coating efficiency, production capacity, reproducibility, robustness, cost-effectiveness, safety and sustainability of the processes in relation to the targeted applications. d) Introducing a Labs Network (PLN) that will include also lab scale processes of the proposed technologies for training and knowledge dissemination.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2014 | Award Amount: 3.50M | Year: 2016

To understand how the brain works, tools need to be developed that will allow neuroscientists to investigate how interactions between individual neurons lead to emergent networks. Towards this goal, we will develop targetable voltage sensing nanorods that self-insert into the cell membrane and optically and non-invasively record action potentials at the single particle and nanoscale level, at multiple sites and across a large field-of-view. In semiconductors, absorption and emission band edges are modulated by an external electric field, even more so when optically excited electron-hole pairs are confined, giving rise to the quantum confined Stark effect. The physical origin of this effect is in the separation of photoexcited charges, creating a dipole that opposes the external field. The proposed sensors will optically record action potential with unique advantages not offered by other methods: much larger voltage sensitivity, high brightness, and hence single-particle voltage sensitivity, large spectral shift (affording noise-immune ratiometric measurements), fast temporal response, minimal photobleaching, large Stokes shifts, large two-photon excitation cross sections, excellent performance in the NIR, and compatibility with lifetime imaging. The proposed sensors could afford, for example, the recording of pre- and post-synaptic membrane potentials, sub-threshold events, ultrafast spiking, individual ion channel activity, or a release of ions from single Ca\2 stores. In addition, deep tissue imaging could be afforded by two photon microscopy and far-field non-linear temporal focusing combined with lifetime imaging. Here we seek to optimize all aspects of the sensors synthesis, functionalization, delivery, targeting and detection, in order to provide neuroscientists and physiologists a viable and user-friendly technology that will be generally useful for the study of action potential signals in the brain and in healthy or diseased heart and muscle tissues.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 6.08M | Year: 2017

Many technologically and societally important mathematical problems are intractable for conventional, serial computers. Therefore, a significant need exists for parallel-computing approaches that are capable to solve such problems within reasonable time frames. Recently, part of our consortium demonstrated proof-of-principle of a parallel-computation system in which a given combinatorial problem is encoded into a graphical, modular network that is embedded in a nanofabricated planar device. The problem is then solved by a large number of independent biological agents, namely molecular-motor-propelled protein filaments, exploring the network in a highly parallel fashion (PNAS 113, 2591 (2016)). Notably, this approach uses orders of magnitude less energy than conventional computers, thus addressing issues related to power-consumption and heat-dissipation. Within Bio4Comp we (i) will establish the technological and scientific basis for robust upscaling of this approach, (ii) will demonstrate scalability by systematically increasing the problem size by several orders of magnitude, and (iii) will develop new algorithms with the aim to open up a wide range of applications. Additionally, we will (iv) help foster and structure an ecosystem of scientists and companies that will accelerate the path to market acceptance, including the creation of a joint roadmap. Benefits to society will include the ability to solve hitherto intractable problems, and the development of a sustainable and energy-efficient computing approach that is radically different from current information and communications technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.49M | Year: 2016

The project aims at developing a pioneering approach to the reception of Classical Antiquity in childrens and young adults contemporary culture. This newly identified research field offers valuable insights into the processes leading to the formation of the culture recipients identities along with their initiation into adulthood. However, the most vital potential of this phenomenon remains unexploited, for the research is still selective, focused mainly on Western culture. With my project, I intend to overcome these limitations by applying regional perspectives without the pejorative implication of regional as parochial or inferior. I recognize regions as extremely valuable contexts of the reception of Antiquity, which is not only passively taken in, but also actively reshaped in childrens and young adults culture in response to regional and global challenges. Thus, the essence of this innovative approach consists in comparative studies of differing reception models not only across Europe but also America, Australia & New Zealand and a bold but necessary step in parts of the world not commonly associated with Graeco-Roman tradition: Africa and Asia. The shared heritage of Classical Antiquity, recently enhanced by the global influence of popular culture (movies, Internet activities, computer games inspired by the classical tradition), gives a unique opportunity through the reception filter to gain deeper understanding of the key social, political and cultural transformations underway at various locations. The added value of this original research, carried out by an international team of scholars, will be its extremely broad impact on the frontiers of scholarship, education and culture: we will elaborate a supra-regional survey of classical references, publish a number of analyses of crucial reception cases, and prepare materials on how to use ancient myths in work with disabled children, thus contributing to integration and stimulating cultural exchange.


Sredni B.,Bar - Ilan University
Seminars in Cancer Biology | Year: 2012

Tellurium is a rare element, which has been regarded as a toxic, non-essential trace element; its biological role, if any, has not been clearly established to date. The investigation of therapeutic activities of tellurium compounds is rather limited in the literature, despite the relative abundance of tellurium in the human body. Nevertheless, the varied activities of tellurium agents in both malignant and normal cells are extremely exciting, though very complex. Not surprisingly, an increased interest in tellurium among biological chemists and pharmacists has fuelled the search for more and more diverse tellurium compounds.The present review will focus on two small inorganic tellurium complexes, ammonium trichloro(dioxoethylene- O,. O')tellurate (AS101) and Octa- O-bis-(R,R)-tartarate ditellurane (SAS), thoroughly investigated by us, converging at their anti-cancer properties, and elucidating their mechanism of action. AS101 is probably the most extensively studied synthetic tellurium compound from the standpoint of its biological activity. It is a potent immunomodulator (both in vitro and in vivo) with a variety of potential therapeutic applications. It is probably the only tellurium compound to be tested in phase I/II clinical studies in cancer patients.The effects of AS101 and SAS are primarily caused by their specific Te(IV) redox-modulating activities enabling the inactivation of cysteine proteases such as cathepsin B, inhibition of specific tumor survival proteins like survivin, or obstruction of tumor IL-10 production. All of these have profound consequences regarding anti-tumor activity or sensitization of tumors to chemotherapy. These properties, coupled with the excellent safety profile of the compounds, suggest promising anti-cancer therapeutic potential for tellurium compounds such as AS101 or SAS. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-STG | Phase: ERC-StG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

The interplay of light and sound waves in matter has attracted the attention of researchers for decades and has found many technological applications. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) provide an exciting playground for such investigations, due to wavelength-scale guiding structures, periodicity in one or two dimensions, and high-quality resonance structures. The objectives of this proposal are to introduce, investigate and employ interactions between guided optical modes and hyper-sonic acoustic waves, within PICs in silicon and in chalcogenide glass media. Both these platforms are extremely important: silicon for its potential for integration of photonics and digital micro-electronics and mature fabrication technology, and chalcogenides for their unique nonlinear-optical and photo-sensitive properties. However, the introduction of hyper-sonic acoustic waves to both materials is highly challenging, due to the absence of piezoelectricity. To address these challenges, this project is based on developing and validating two alternative methods for the generation of high-frequency acoustic waves. First, photo-acoustic absorption of intense, ultrafast laser pulses by periodic, metallic patterns will be employed. The technique is being used in bulk silicon substrates, and will be carried over and adapted for use in silicon and chalcogenide glass PICs. Second, carefully controlled stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) processes will be used to excite acoustic waves along chalcogenide PICs in a highly localized fashion. Prospective outcomes include new fundamental insights into the opto-mechanical properties of materials, films and periodic structures; novel functionalities of silicon and chalcogenide PICs, such as acousto-optic modulation, dynamic gratings and elasto-optic super-lattices; new types of sensors, such as chip-level distributed measurements of strain, temperature and modal profile; and a first look at non-local behaviour of SBS.

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